Berkeley Wilde - Voice & Echo (EREV)

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  • Purpose: to introduce yourself and outline the content and style of the session
  • Purpose: to warm people up, give you an idea of who is there and what there expectations are Flipchart their responses to what interest them about the session
  • Purpose: to be clear about the aims of the session
  • Purpose: to get participants thinking about and relating to the idea of ‘influence’ See Exercise 1 in Part 1 – Handy Guide
  • Purpose – to illustrate the complexities of the term ‘influence’
  • Purpose: to illustrate the different ways in which ‘influence’ can be interpreted, introduce some of the issues around evaluating influence and offer people an opportunity to comment
  • Purpose - to introduce your audience to what Voice looks like - to provide a brief overview of Voice as a whole
  • Purpose – to get an immediate idea of how much influence people feel the group has This is about individuals making their own personal judgement. See Exercise 3 in Part I – Handy Guide and, for more detail, Section 4 in Part 2 – assessment tool
  • Purpose To introduce the vertical axis To take the audience through each of the 10 steps – telling a story To clarify that the point at which the horizontal axis is crossed goes from looking internally to being outward facing See Exercise 2 in Part 1 – Handy Guide and, for more detail Section 3 in Part 2 – assessment tool
  • Purpose: to illustrate how Voice can reflect a range of experiences relating to power and influence You may want to an exercise around this See Section 2 in Part 2 – assessment tool
  • Purpose: to show how the indicators relate to the step itself and illustrate how the capacity of people is increasing See Section 3 in Part 2 – assessment tool You should stress that this is about individual members of the group – not the group as a whole
  • Purpose: illustrate the increased capacity of networks who are positioned higher up the vertical axis Stress that this is now about the group as a collective whole
  • Purpose: to show that the indicators relate to different aspects of what makes us influential as groups, networks and communities (as opposed to individuals who are in particular positions of ‘power’) See Section 2 in Part 3 – development tool Some suggested things to say: “You may have noticed that the indicators have symbols next to them – there are 5 different symbols – These symbols – when taken together – are about community empowerment – working in ways which make sure that what you are doing is an empowering experience for your members and those around you, and that your group, and the people involved in it are empowered. So you can really see what you do well and what you might need to work on …. When you are going through the indicators for the different steps there may be some symbols that you tick every time – and others that are always harder. This ‘coding’ helps you to see where your strengths are – the ones you can shout about – and perhaps help others with.
  • Purpose: This is an opportunity for participants to assess their capacity to influence, to get them talking to each other and to provide you, the facilitator, with an opportunity to assess their understanding See Exercise 2 in Part 1 – Handy Guide
  • Purpose – to pull it all together and plot where the group is on Voice See Section 5 in Part 2 – assessment tool It is really important to take notes at this stage – note down: Where members of the network get to on the vertical axis Which indicators they struggle with – and what they say about them You will need these notes to plan Session two
  • Module 1: It’s all about influence
  • What influence means Examples, activity & discussion
  • Something to bear in mind, alongside different ways to influence
  • Exploring ‘community’ Understanding what ‘community’ means Activity around the different communities that people belong to
  • Why ‘community influence’ matters Examples, activity & discussion
  • Community Empowerment Examples, activity & discussion
  • Breaking down the concept of ‘community empowerment’ into five clear interlinked dimensions
  • Voice and echo Bridging the gap between agencies and communities
  • A brief overview of echo
  • An overview of the detail on the horizontal axis
  • What the vertical axis can offer Examples, activity & discussion
  • A look at some examples of the factors that impact on an agency’s potential to respond to community influence Includes activity & discussion
  • Plotting on the vertical axis Examples, activity & discussion
  • What the horizontal axis can offer Introductory information
  • How the horizontal axis works
  • Something to bear in mind
  • The four quadrants: four distinct experiences Examples, activity and discussion
  • Plotting on the echo framework Examples, activity and discussion
  • This is the license page for echo – you do not have to show it when presenting but it should not be removed from the presentation. This presentation can be downloaded from the echo facilitators group at http://changesuk.net/network

Transcript

  • 1. © changes, 2009 Voice & Echo welcome to …
  • 2. introductions
    • Who you are
    • Where you are from
    • What interests you about today’s session
    © changes, 2009
  • 3. what I hope you will go away with
    • An understanding of ‘Voice’ and ‘Echo’ and what it can offer you
    • A clearer idea of your position to influence and where you want to be in terms of influence
    • Some thoughts about what needs to happen for you to be more influential
    • Introducing ‘Dynamo’
    © changes, 2009
  • 4.
    • what does ‘ influence ’ mean?
    © changes, 2009
  • 5. © changes, 2009 method – ways we influence quality – what helps us to influence outcome – what happens as a result of influence
  • 6. influence as…. © changes, 2009
    • outcome
    • are listened to
    • are taken more seriously
    • have an effect on somebody or something
    • cause something to happen: shape the direction of change
    • know what happens as a result of your input
    • know what’s going on
    • better decisions are made
    • method
    • Share information, learning and achievements
    • Coach, encourage, guide and support others
    • Earn respect in order to be listened to
    • Develop useful links and positive contacts
    • Provide gentle direction towards agreed aim
    • Exert pressure when needed
    • Communicate and persuade others – negotiate
    • Enforce legal and statutory requirements
    • quality
    • Power and authority
    • Experience and knowledge
    • Reputation for getting things done
    • Being a catalyst
    • Well connected
    • Courage to stand up for what you believe in
  • 7. © changes, 2009 No influence A lot of influence Voice
  • 8. horizontal axis: how much influence do you feel your group has? © changes, 2009 No influence A lot of influence
  • 9. vertical axis: capacity to influence © changes, 2009
  • 10. © changes, 2009 The group is well organised and has done a lot of work around empowerment of members. But the group is trying to change things – or attitudes – that are fixed. Being here feels frustrating and powerless – the group is banging on a locked door and may need to reconsider what it wants to influence or its approach The group is well organised. This is a positive experience – the group feels influential and powerful and the doors are open to it You feel powerless and as if there is little hope of changing anything. You are not working very well together as a group and there are no openings for your issues. You may need to reconsider what you want to influence or your approach to it. You have low expectations – although these may be realistic for the capacity of your group. You need to organise more collectively – as a group. The political climate is likely to be favourable to your work No influence A lot of influence
  • 11. © changes, 2009
    • People:
    • have the confidence to question
    • feel able to take risks
    • contribute to discussions and feel listened to
    • feel that – as a group - they can change things
    • recognise and celebrate achievements
    Step 3 willing to have a go
  • 12. © changes, 2009
    • The group:
    • makes contact and builds strategic relationships with organisations working around similar issues from different perspectives
    • promotes good relations between groups / organisations
    • brings own distinctive voice to an alliance
    •  links with other networks / organisations– identifies common concerns, agrees common strategies and knows the issues they are working with
    •  develops and maintains links to national bodies
    Step 8 links with others to influence
  • 13. © changes, 2009 The symbols are about:  increasing people’s skills, knowledge and confidence  including people – not excluding them  bringing people together around common issues and concern  building positive relationships across different groups and networks  leading to communities taking part and influencing decisions, services and activities getting the most from ‘Voice’
  • 14. where is your group on the vertical axis? © changes, 2009
  • 15. © changes, 2009 No influence A lot of influence Where you are on Voice
  • 16. © changes, 2009 Echo
  • 17. © changes, 2009 the ability to affect/bring about change changing a decision changing a mind-set influencing a climate of opinion shaping ideas feeding in information being heard views being taken into account setting an agenda providing opportunities for engagement dialogue In any given context, ‘community influence’ can be about:
  • 18. It’s not easy to define
    • “ the power to shape or influence ideas
    • is one of the most significant powers
    • there is, though tracing the precise
    • nature and course of such influence is
    • rarely easy”
    • Carnegie: Power moves, exploring power and influence in the UK, 2008
    © changes, 2009
  • 19. © changes, 2009 communities i belong to ……
  • 20. © changes, 2009 why ‘community influence’ matters: Responsibilities as a public agency
    • We are public servants / communities are tax payers
    • Statutory obligation / it is our core business
    Achieving better outcomes - for communities and agencies
    • Helps me test what we are doing
    • Listening to those who don’t always speak / so lone voices don’t skew our priorities
    • Bottom up intelligence
    Doing the job better
    • Leads to more appropriate services
    • Gives communities ownership / gives agencies legitimacy
    • Builds communities understanding - and community cohesion
    • Promotes more trust between communities and agencies, citizens & communities
  • 21. © changes, 2009 benefits of working in empowering ways
    • better quality services and outcomes for individuals and communities
    • innovation and creativity
    • reduced conflict
    • access to new resources and expertise
    • sustainability of outcomes
    • enhanced motivation among front-line staff
    • improvements in inclusion and cohesion
    • increased accountability to the public
    • positive outcomes for the individuals involved
    • In Ipsos Mori Social Research Institute, Searching for the Impact of Empowerment, July 2008, p23
  • 22. © changes, 2009 what we mean by “ community empowerment”
  • 23. © changes, 2009 it’s all about influence …. The ‘voice’ The ‘echo’
  • 24. © changes, 2009 A lot of potential to respond to community influence No potential to respond to community influence Closed to community influence Open to community influence
  • 25. © changes, 2009
  • 26. © changes, 2009 A lot of potential to respond to community influence No potential to respond to community influence 6 5 4 3 2 1
  • 27. © changes, 2009 Factors impacting on an agency’s potential to respond to community influence National government: external inspection, timetables, legislation Targets Structures: service delivery models, communication Understanding concepts: collective understandings, workable understandings across sectors Political machinery: structures and cultures The law: health & safety, compliance, procurement Funding and limited resources Major events: economic downturn Strategic options: hard choices
  • 28. score these factors © changes, 2009 If they get in the way a lot – give them a ‘1’ If they help a lot – give them a ‘6’ for example:
  • 29. © changes, 2009 … is aspirational –positive direction of travel – a journey … illustrates a shift from doing things to communities to doing things with communities Horizontal axis…
  • 30.
    • 1 Closed to influence
    • 2 Respond to individuals
    • 3 Make contact with people
    • 4 Change focus to groups and communities
    • 5 Recognise the value of community influence
    • 6 Recognise the possibilities for influence
    • 7 Support communities to influence
    • 8 Work together
    • 9 Change how we do things
    • 10 Open to influence
    © changes, 2009 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Closed to influence Open to influence
  • 31. The horizontal axis
    • … can provide the space to share opinions, evidence and ideas about the state of play within an agency or a partnership in relation to how open or closed they are to community influence
    © changes, 2009
  • 32. © changes, 2009 A lot of potential to respond to community influence No potential to respond to community influence Closed to community influence Open to community influence This could be quite an exciting and interesting place to be as it is up to the agency to choose to move things forward. OR – it may feel frustrating as the ‘engine’ of the agency stops you from moving forwards. Leadership may be weak and staff feel like their job involves a lot of work and no action. There may be little accountability and so an increased need for scrutiny, checks and balances This feels like a creative agency with space to take risks. Service delivery meets needs, the organisation is outcome driven and responsive to change. Staff experience tremendous job satisfaction. The agency is transparent and accountable. Additionally, staff may need a challenge to avoid complacency and there may be a responsibility on the agency to share learning and lead by example This feels frustrating but hopeful – there may be little money or political will but agencies have good relationships with communities and could help them to try different approaches which would reduce the constraint on the agency. There may be security in routine for staff and continuity for the public. Agencies want to find solutions and have the creativity to make suggestions – they may need to work at winning hearts and minds This feels like there is no public presence and so no accountability. The agency is number-crunching and robotic. It is a dispiriting place to be. To the outside world, the agency may appear arrogant, superior, uncaring and distant. It is likely to be a risk averse organisation which feels safe and comfortable for senior staff.
  • 33. © changes, 2009 A lot of potential to respond to community influence No potential to respond to community influence Closed to community influence Open to community influence
  • 34. © changes, 2009 DYNAMO introducing
  • 35. © changes, 2009 A lot of potential to respond to priorities No potential to respond to priorities Agents want things to be different Agents influence
  • 36. © changes, 2009 e.g. Political; Economic; Social; Technological; Environmental; Legal; Structural; identifying the factors which impact on your agency’s potential to respond to priorities ?
  • 37. © changes, 2009 plotting on the vertical
  • 38. © changes, 2009 10 positions on the horizontal axis 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Agents want things to be different Agents influence the horizontal
  • 39. the horizontal in more detail © changes, 2009 Step 1 Want things to be different Step 2 Know the story – why it matters Step 3 Willing to think about working differently Step 4 Clarify outcomes Step 5 Link with others you want to work with Step 6 Know the political landscape – levers and barriers Step 7 Plan who, what and when to influence – develop a strategy Step 8 Link with others outside the organisation Step 9 Choose how to influence Step 10 Influence
  • 40. Step 1 – Want things to be different © changes, 2009
    • Feel isolated, powerless, frustrated within their organisation
    • Want their views on to be heard
    • Have a sense of social justice
    • Talk to others about their concerns and ideas
    • Feel that others share their views
    Agents:
  • 41. Step 6 – Know the political landscape © changes, 2009
    • Know what impacts on their agency’s potential
    • to respond to priorities
    • (vertical axis)
    • Map their barriers and assists to influence
    • Know their audience – what drives them and
    • what would hook them in
    • Find out the facts
    Agents:
  • 42. Step 10 – Influence © changes, 2009
    • Are consulted and asked opinions
    • Are involved in the process of shaping priorities
    • Can identify their contribution
    • Are invited to chair/facilitate subject-relevant meetings
    • Are encouraged and supported by senior staff to take part in different fora
    • Provide feedback which is sought and valued
    • See desired changes arising from their challenges
    • Systems are changed
    • People own the (e.g. equalities) agenda
    • People understand the issues around equalities
    • Budgets support equalitites priorities
    Agents:
  • 43. the horizontal © changes, 2009 Step 1 Want things to be different Step 2 Know the story – why it matters Step 3 Willing to think about working differently Step 4 Clarify outcomes Step 5 Link with others you want to work with Step 6 Know the political landscape – levers and barriers Step 7 Plan who, what and when to influence – develop a strategy Step 8 Link with others outside the organisation Step 9 Choose how to influence Step 10 Influence
  • 44. © changes, 2009 A lot of potential to respond No potential to respond things to be different influence 4 quadrants 4 experiences
  • 45. © changes, 2009 What next?
  • 46. Voice & Echo Facilitator Training
    • Visit http://changesuk.net/
    • Visit http://www.southwestforum.org.uk/
    © changes, 2009
  • 47. copyright © changes, 2010 You are free to share, to copy, distribute and transmit this presentation under the following conditions: © changes, 2009
    • You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the above - © changes, 2010 - (but not in any way that suggests that changes endorses you or your use of the work)
    • You may not use this work for commercial purposes
    • You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work.
    • For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. One way to do this is with a link to http://changesuk.net
    Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder. Nothing in this license impairs or restricts the author’s moral rights. This is a Creative Commons license, a fair way between the extremes of copyright control and uncontrolled exploitation. For more information about Creative Commons visit: www.creativecommons.org.uk
  • 48. Contact
    • Berkeley Wilde, Minotaur Communications
    • Minotaur Communications is an independent research, evaluation and training management consultancy, specialist in equality, diversity and human rights.
    • Minotaur Communications works across all equalities protected categories including:
    • Age
    • Disability
    • Gender reassignment
    • Pregnancy and maternity
    • Race
    • Religion or belief
    • Sex
    • Sexual orientation
    • Minotaur Communications works throughout the UK.
    • Contact
    • (p) 07747 752 454
    • (e) info@minotaurcommunications.co.uk
    • (w) www.minotaurcommunications.co.uk
    © changes, 2009