Communication &
Leadership Frameworks

 • Storytelling from Communication theory
 • Group existence
 • Using stories to cr...
Storytelling Frameworks
Digital Storytelling



  • Video & audio narratives
       of participants
  • Empowers the parti...
Storytelling Frameworks
Narrating the Self



  • Fosters individual identification
  • Empowers the individual




   Ada...
Storytelling Frameworks
Narrating the Organization



  • Intended to unify the group
  • Constructs the experience




  ...
Storytelling Frameworks
Narrating Change



  • Develops organizational identity
  • Establishes visions, goals
  • Inspir...
Consulting Approach
Usefulness


  • Separate past from future anchor point
  • Connect with the audience
  • Allows audie...
Assessing the Situation
What’s occurring in the organization?



  • Understand internal risks:
       changes in budget, ...
Consulting Method
 Design a storytelling workshop or retreat
 depending on the hours an organization
 wants to invest in t...
Design questions




           Adapted from Denning (2005)
Design Objectives
Purpose

  Increase team unity and morale
  through a relations-based method that
  requires self-disclo...
Design Objectives
Timeline

  • Workshop is 90 minutes to three hours
  • Retreat is one to three days
  • Content adjuste...
Design Objectives
Pacing

  • Interval pacing
  • Group activity interspersed with
       presentation by trainer
  • Brea...
Design Objectives
Participant Skill Level

  • Allow for a diverse group
  • Participants must be:
       • Willing to par...
Design Objectives
Facilitator Skill Level

  • Communicate clearly
  • Familiarity with method and
       presentation tec...
Design Objectives
Story Typology

  • Story of I
  • Story of We
  • Story of Place
  • Story of Future
  • I Want




   ...
Design Objectives
Group Size

  • Need at least two groups
  • Break groups into a minimum
       of three or four individ...
Workshop
Prior to conducting the workshop

  • Encourage participation through
       sharing in a public setting
       •...
Workshop
Ground Rules

  • Establish the level of confidentiality
       for participants
  • Maintain a positive atmosphe...
Workshop
Phase 1: Introduction & Explanation

  • Facilitate a safe & relaxed learning space
  • Introduce the method of s...
Workshop
Phase 2: Co-create Content

  • Restate ground rules of respect
  • Provide an example that empowers
       parti...
Workshop
Phase 3: Transition Content
        to Digital Process

  • Create a written script
  • Consider feedback from pe...
Workshop
Phase 4: Finished Product

  • May be necessary to help complete
       digital story editing
  • Invite particip...
Ethical implications

 • No repercussions for sharing
      • Establish confidentiality rules
 • Consider immunity clauses...
Intention of Storytelling

 • Not a therapy session
 • Empower the participant
 • Improve moral
 • Improve team dynamics &...
Conclusion

 • Learn from the past & create a future
 • Positive results include:
      • Self-awareness
      • Fosters d...
References
Albert, J. (2010, June). Leadership story types. Course handout. Gonzaga University: Spokane, WA.
Block, P. (20...
Storytelling as a Consulting Tool
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Storytelling as a Consulting Tool

2,053

Published on

Group 3, COML 511, Module 3 Presentation

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,053
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
47
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Storytelling as a Consulting Tool

  1. 1. Communication & Leadership Frameworks • Storytelling from Communication theory • Group existence • Using stories to create the future • Symbolic-Interpretive (SI) • Social Cognitive (SC) • Coordinated Management of Meaning (CMM) Adapted from Altman and Taylor (1973, cited in Caputo, Hazel, McMahon, & Dannels, 2004, pp. 110-111); Cronen (2001); Griffin (2009); Frey & Sunwolf (2005); IDEA (2010); Pearce (2004; 2008).
  2. 2. Storytelling Frameworks Digital Storytelling • Video & audio narratives of participants • Empowers the participant • Allows for team building/understanding • Participants choose the topic Adapted from CFDS (2010); Gubrium (2009); Halpern and Lubar (2003); Rulun (2010); The European Graduate School (2010).
  3. 3. Storytelling Frameworks Narrating the Self • Fosters individual identification • Empowers the individual Adapted from Denning (2005); Lipman (1999); McAdams (1993)
  4. 4. Storytelling Frameworks Narrating the Organization • Intended to unify the group • Constructs the experience Adapted from McAdams (1993)
  5. 5. Storytelling Frameworks Narrating Change • Develops organizational identity • Establishes visions, goals • Inspires change (turning points) Adapted from Bruner (1991); Denzin (2003); Maruska (2004); McKee (2003)
  6. 6. Consulting Approach Usefulness • Separate past from future anchor point • Connect with the audience • Allows audience participation Adapted from Block (2009); Bruner (1991); Lipman (1999); McKee (2003)
  7. 7. Assessing the Situation What’s occurring in the organization? • Understand internal risks: changes in budget, layoffs, technology, conflicts, etc. • Understand the risks of storytelling • Storytelling requires courage
  8. 8. Consulting Method Design a storytelling workshop or retreat depending on the hours an organization wants to invest in this approach.
  9. 9. Design questions Adapted from Denning (2005)
  10. 10. Design Objectives Purpose Increase team unity and morale through a relations-based method that requires self-disclosure, self-awareness & empathetic understanding Adapted from J. Albert (personal communication, June 10, 2010)
  11. 11. Design Objectives Timeline • Workshop is 90 minutes to three hours • Retreat is one to three days • Content adjusted to meet allotted time
  12. 12. Design Objectives Pacing • Interval pacing • Group activity interspersed with presentation by trainer • Breaks at 60 to 90 minutes
  13. 13. Design Objectives Participant Skill Level • Allow for a diverse group • Participants must be: • Willing to participate • Open to other perspectives & stories
  14. 14. Design Objectives Facilitator Skill Level • Communicate clearly • Familiarity with method and presentation technology • Aware of socio-psychological needs • Ensure confidentiality • Willingness to listen • Engage feedback and participation • Flexible • Lead by example Adapted from J. Albert (personal communication, June 10, 2010); Rogers (1989)
  15. 15. Design Objectives Story Typology • Story of I • Story of We • Story of Place • Story of Future • I Want Adapted from Denning (2005); Gubrium (2009); Lipman (1999); Rogers (1989)
  16. 16. Design Objectives Group Size • Need at least two groups • Break groups into a minimum of three or four individuals
  17. 17. Workshop Prior to conducting the workshop • Encourage participation through sharing in a public setting • Adaption to private settings • Adaption to mass audiences • Inform participants of desired outcomes • Preparation of own stories • Visual Aids incorporated into video
  18. 18. Workshop Ground Rules • Establish the level of confidentiality for participants • Maintain a positive atmosphere • Participants should only present what they feel comfortable sharing Adapted from Block (2002); Campbell (2009); Lefer (2008); J. Albert (personal communication, June 10, 2010)
  19. 19. Workshop Phase 1: Introduction & Explanation • Facilitate a safe & relaxed learning space • Introduce the method of storytelling • Present examples • Explain the Seven Elements • Describe the conceptual framework & benefits behind personal narratives Adapted from Gurbium (2009); J. Albert (personal communication, June 10, 2010)
  20. 20. Workshop Phase 2: Co-create Content • Restate ground rules of respect • Provide an example that empowers participants with courage • Break into small groups • Reiterate the Seven Elements • Actively listen and respectfully comment on stories when complete
  21. 21. Workshop Phase 3: Transition Content to Digital Process • Create a written script • Consider feedback from peers • Create stories as a group or individually • Brief tutorial of digital image editing • Instructions & tips about voice recording • Remind participants practicing will achieve competency • Allot a time frame for completion
  22. 22. Workshop Phase 4: Finished Product • May be necessary to help complete digital story editing • Invite participants to share stories • Transition session to closure • Share what was learned • Seek feedback from participants • Suggestions for improvement • Conclude the workshop Workshop Phases adapted from Denning (2005); Denzin (2003); Gurbium (2009); McAdams (1993); J. Albert (personal communication, June 10, 2010); Silberman and Auerbach (2006)
  23. 23. Ethical implications • No repercussions for sharing • Establish confidentiality rules • Consider immunity clauses • Information only viewed by a select group • Always gain permission from participants to share any information • Keep organization's expectations in mind
  24. 24. Intention of Storytelling • Not a therapy session • Empower the participant • Improve moral • Improve team dynamics & unity • Only as successful as the participants allow • Facilitators needs to lead by example
  25. 25. Conclusion • Learn from the past & create a future • Positive results include: • Self-awareness • Fosters dialogue • Presentation & technical skills • Boost morale • Inspire beneficial change • Engage heart and mind • Gain understanding of culture & the organization, teams & departments
  26. 26. References Albert, J. (2010, June). Leadership story types. Course handout. Gonzaga University: Spokane, WA. Block, P. (2002). The answer to how is yes: Acting on what matters. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler. Block, P. (2009). Community: the structure of belonging. San Francisco: Berrett Koehler. Bruner, J. (1991). Self-making and world-making. Journal of Aesthetic Education, 25, 1, 67-78. Campbell, S. (2009). I want... In J. Stewart (Ed.), Bridges not walls: a book about interpersonal communication (10th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. Caputo, J.S., Hazel, H.C., McMahon, C., & Dannels, D. (2002). Communicating effectively: linking thought and expression (3rd ed.). Dubuque, IO: Kendall/Hunt. CFDS. (2010). Center for Digital Storytelling. Retrieved June 16, 2010, from http://www.storycenter.org Denning, S. (2005). The leader's guide to storytelling: mastering the art and the discipline of business and narrative. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Denzin, N. K. (2003). Performance ethnography: Critical pedagogy and the politics of culture. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Gubrium, A. (2009). Digital storytelling as a method for engaged scholarship and anthropology. Practicing Anthropology, 31(4), 5-7. Halpern, B.L., & Lubar, K. (2003). Leadership presence: dramatic techniques to reach out, motivate, and inspire. New York: Gotham. Institute for Dynamic Educational Advancement (IDEA). (2010). Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). Retrieved June 21, 2010, from http://www.idea.org/page110.html Lefer, D. (2008, April). Both sides: Connie Rice lays down the law to cops and gangs. The Sun, 388, 3-11. Maruska, D. (2004). How great decisions get made: 10 easy steps for reaching agreement on even the toughest issues. New York: AMACOM. McAdams, D.P. (1993). The stories we live by: personal myths and the making of the self. New York: Guilford. McKee, R. (2003, June). Storytelling that moves people: a conversation with screenwriting coach Robert McKee. Different Voice. Harvard Business Review, 51-57. Rogers, C. (1989). On becoming a person: A therapist's view of psychotherapy. New York: Houghton Mifflin. Rulun, Z. (2010). Is an ethics of economic activity possible? Retrieved June 16, 2010, from http://www.crvp.org/book/Series03/III-14/chapter_viii.htm Silberman, M, & Auerbach, C. (2006). Active training: a handbook of techniques, designs, case examples, and tips (3rd ed.). San Francisco: Pfeiffer. The European Graduate School. (2010). Arts, health, & society: about. Retrieved June 16, 2010, from http://www.egs.edu/arts-health-society/about/
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×