NORAD presents: The #1 reason general aviation are intercepted and how to avoid it.

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  • The best way to reduce presenting a threatening behavior is to comply with ATC instructions and monitor VHF or UHF emergency/guard frequencies. If not able to maintain a listening watch and you are intercepted, notify ATC of the situation and switch to emergency/guard frequency to talk directly to the interceptor.Get into the books and re-familiarize yourself with ICAO intercept procedures.Noncompliance may result in the use of force.Transition: Next, let’s look at ICAO intercept procedures.
  • The Aeronautical Information Manual provides details on ICAO intercept procedures.Don’t be startled when a fighter or helicopter shows up on your wing. It is crucial that you maintain your current heading, altitude and airspeed and remain calm. Although you may be very uncomfortable with an aircraft close to you, the interceptor will ensure aircraft separation and will not be a conflict to your flight path. Comply with his directions. Also be aware that there may be an additional interceptor that you don’t see. Transition: What are your responsibilities and actions after being intercepted?
  • The Aeronautical Information Manual provides details on ICAO intercept procedures.Don’t be startled when a fighter or helicopter shows up on your wing. It is crucial that you maintain your current heading, altitude and airspeed and remain calm. Although you may be very uncomfortable with an aircraft close to you, the interceptor will ensure aircraft separation and will not be a conflict to your flight path. Comply with his directions. Also be aware that there may be an additional interceptor that you don’t see. Transition: What are your responsibilities and actions after being intercepted?
  • The Aeronautical Information Manual provides details on ICAO intercept procedures.Don’t be startled when a fighter or helicopter shows up on your wing. It is crucial that you maintain your current heading, altitude and airspeed and remain calm. Although you may be very uncomfortable with an aircraft close to you, the interceptor will ensure aircraft separation and will not be a conflict to your flight path. Comply with his directions. Also be aware that there may be an additional interceptor that you don’t see. Transition: What are your responsibilities and actions after being intercepted?
  • NORAD may divert your aircraft to a nearby airfield that is suitable for your type of aircraft. After the initial intercept and the fighter rocks his wings and gets your acknowledgement, he will roll out on a heading that he wants you to turn to. You must comply and turn to the heading set by the interceptor. Reattempt to contact the interceptor on guard frequency and attempt to contact ATC if the ATC frequency is known.For aircraft speed above approximately 250 mph, one fighter interceptor will remain close to the aircraft and the other will remain 1-5 miles behind the aircraft. For aircraft that are slower than 250 mph, the fighter interceptor will be unable to slow to your speed. The two fighter interceptors will orchestrate a ‘racetrack’ pattern. One fighter will slow to identify the aircraft during a slow-speed pass and then turn 180 degrees and reposition to 3-5 mile trail while the second fighter will move into a position to be able to further identify or guide the aircraft. This will continue until the aircraft lands at the divert field or the fighters are told to discontinue the mission.Transition: Let’s look at a video of an interceptor directing the intercepted aircraft to follow then we will look at the Headbutt maneuver?
  • NORAD may divert your aircraft to a nearby airfield that is suitable for your type of aircraft. After the initial intercept and the fighter rocks his wings and gets your acknowledgement, he will roll out on a heading that he wants you to turn to. You must comply and turn to the heading set by the interceptor. Reattempt to contact the interceptor on guard frequency and attempt to contact ATC if the ATC frequency is known.For aircraft speed above approximately 250 mph, one fighter interceptor will remain close to the aircraft and the other will remain 1-5 miles behind the aircraft. For aircraft that are slower than 250 mph, the fighter interceptor will be unable to slow to your speed. The two fighter interceptors will orchestrate a ‘racetrack’ pattern. One fighter will slow to identify the aircraft during a slow-speed pass and then turn 180 degrees and reposition to 3-5 mile trail while the second fighter will move into a position to be able to further identify or guide the aircraft. This will continue until the aircraft lands at the divert field or the fighters are told to discontinue the mission.Transition: Let’s look at a video of an interceptor directing the intercepted aircraft to follow then we will look at the Headbutt maneuver?
  • NORAD may divert your aircraft to a nearby airfield that is suitable for your type of aircraft. After the initial intercept and the fighter rocks his wings and gets your acknowledgement, he will roll out on a heading that he wants you to turn to. You must comply and turn to the heading set by the interceptor. Reattempt to contact the interceptor on guard frequency and attempt to contact ATC if the ATC frequency is known.For aircraft speed above approximately 250 mph, one fighter interceptor will remain close to the aircraft and the other will remain 1-5 miles behind the aircraft. For aircraft that are slower than 250 mph, the fighter interceptor will be unable to slow to your speed. The two fighter interceptors will orchestrate a ‘racetrack’ pattern. One fighter will slow to identify the aircraft during a slow-speed pass and then turn 180 degrees and reposition to 3-5 mile trail while the second fighter will move into a position to be able to further identify or guide the aircraft. This will continue until the aircraft lands at the divert field or the fighters are told to discontinue the mission.Transition: Let’s look at a video of an interceptor directing the intercepted aircraft to follow then we will look at the Headbutt maneuver?
  • If you see the interceptor dispense flares and maneuver in front of your aircraft, you must pay strict attention and immediately follow the interceptors directions.Failure to comply at this point is not recommended. If tuned to guard frequency you may hear on the radio:“If you do not follow these instructions, you may be fired upon.”Transition: Here is a video of the headbutt maneuver. After the video we will look at :(GA brief) How NORAD Helicopter intercept procedures differ from fighter intercept procedures.(Corporate/commercial carriers) The Visual Warning System to alert pilots in the Washington D.C. Special Fight Rules Area (SFRA).
  • The Aeronautical Information Manual provides details on ICAO intercept procedures.Don’t be startled when a fighter or helicopter shows up on your wing. It is crucial that you maintain your current heading, altitude and airspeed and remain calm. Although you may be very uncomfortable with an aircraft close to you, the interceptor will ensure aircraft separation and will not be a conflict to your flight path. Comply with his directions. Also be aware that there may be an additional interceptor that you don’t see. Transition: What are your responsibilities and actions after being intercepted?
  • Post intercept procedures are the same ICAO intercept procedures used when intercepted by a fighter aircraft.Visual signaling devices may be employed in an attempt to communicate with the intercepted aircraft. Visual signaling devices may include, but are not limited to, LED scrolling signboards or blue flashing lights. If compliance is not attained through the use of radios or signaling devices, standard ICAO intercept signals (Table 5-6-1) may be employed. In order to maintain safe aircraft separation, it is incumbent upon the pilot of the intercepted aircraft not to fall into a trail position (directly behind the helicopter) if instructed to follow the helicopter as the helicopter pilot may lose visual contact with the intercepted aircraft.Transition: Here is a video of the Helicopter’s signboard signaling device. We’ll also look at the other messages you may see.
  • Post intercept procedures are the same ICAO intercept procedures used when intercepted by a fighter aircraft.Visual signaling devices may be employed in an attempt to communicate with the intercepted aircraft. Visual signaling devices may include, but are not limited to, LED scrolling signboards or blue flashing lights. If compliance is not attained through the use of radios or signaling devices, standard ICAO intercept signals (Table 5-6-1) may be employed. In order to maintain safe aircraft separation, it is incumbent upon the pilot of the intercepted aircraft not to fall into a trail position (directly behind the helicopter) if instructed to follow the helicopter as the helicopter pilot may lose visual contact with the intercepted aircraft.Transition: Here is a video of the Helicopter’s signboard signaling device. We’ll also look at the other messages you may see.
  • The Visual Warning System (VWS) is an additional means for NORAD to warn aircraft that have strayed into, or pose a threat, to the national capital region.The VWS consists of a number of strategically placed ‘eye safe’ laser generators around the Washington D.C. Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA).If you are in the SFRA and are not complying with flight restrictions, you may see the green, red, red flashes of the VWS. Immediately turn away from the VWS and tune your radio to ATC or guard frequency. Contact ATC and identify yourself, your location and intentions.To get more information on the flight rules in the SFRA, use the link provided to access the FAA Washignton D.C. SFRA text. AOPA also has an interactive course available on it’s website.Transition: Next, let’s take a look at NORAD’s intercept aircraft.
  • NORAD presents: The #1 reason general aviation are intercepted and how to avoid it.

    1. 1. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED1North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD)Fly Smart, We’re WatchingThis Briefing is UNCLASSIFIEDApril 2013
    2. 2. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED2Civil Aviation Training• Scenario:– Beautiful sunny dayClick to play video clip
    3. 3. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED3Education• This training will educate pilots on:– NORAD Operations– Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs)– Preflight planning to avoid TFRs– Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) procedures– What to do if you are interceptedAviation Security impacts every airman thatoperates within the National Airspace System
    4. 4. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED4• AOPA member since 1988• US Air Force fighter pilot• NBAA member since 2008– G200 at KAPA• NORAD ReservistLt Col Kevin “Big Jim” Roethe
    5. 5. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED5• North American Aerospace Defense Command– Bi-National Command• USA and Canada– Established in 1958– HQ at Peterson AFB, CO– What is NORAD’s mission?NORAD Mission
    6. 6. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED6Track Santa!NORAD Mission
    7. 7. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED7If Santa violates a TFR…NORAD Mission
    8. 8. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED81) Aerospace Warning2) Aerospace Control3) Maritime WarningAerospace Control:Respond to unauthorizedair activity approaching oroperating within NorthAmerican airspaceNORAD Mission
    9. 9. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED9NORAD Mission – Cold War and Pre-9/11B44B45B46B90 B92A12A11J60J75J76J77J79 J78J80J81J82J83J34J33J32J31J30J29J28J27 J26J25J16J15J14J13J12J11J10J09 J06J05J04J03J02J01J50J51J52J56J55J62J58 J53J54 R51R52R54NL0NK0NJ0NH0NG0NF0NE0ND0NCONB0NA0A21A19A17A15A13A10A09A08 A07A06A05A04 A03A02A01R02 CANRCONRANRB40B41B42CENEADSSEADSWADSCWA14B43AdakCMOCBangor
    10. 10. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED10NORAD Mission – Post-9/11 and TodayB44B45B46B90 B92A12A11J60J75J76J77J79 J78J80J81J82J83J34J33J32J31J30J29J28J27J26J25J16J15J14J13J12J11J10J09 J06J05J04J03J02J01J50J51J52J56J55J62J58 J53J54 R51R52R54NL0NK0NJ0NH0NG0NF0NE0ND0NCONB0NA0A21A19A17A15A13A10A09A08 A07A06A05A04 A03A02A01R02 CANRCONRANRB40B41B42CENEADSSEADSWADSCWA14B43AdakCMOCBangorCavalier
    11. 11. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED11We need your help• Fighter aircraft involved 300+ times/yr (scramble, runway alert, etc)• Expends valuable military resources• Diverts attention from real threats• Risks a deadly mistake – possible use of deadly forceWhy Do You Care?
    12. 12. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED12• Event isn’t over when you clear restricted airspace• Law Enforcement and FAA take over• Unauthorized TFR / ADIZ penetration can result in:– FAA Pilot Deviation and/or loss/suspension of Pilot License– Fine and/or jail time– Putting you and your passengers in unsafe situationWhy Do You Care?
    13. 13. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED• Unauthorized Entry:• National Security related TFR• Wash DC Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA)• Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) boundary• Potential Threat to Civil Aviation – FAA or Airline request- Not in Radio Communication with Air Traffic Control- Off Flight Plan- Deviation from flight rules- Passenger on No-fly list- In-flight disturbance- Deviation from assigned IFF Squawk (i.e. 7500)• Request from Federal Agency – i.e. CBP, TSA, FBI, etc13When Does NORAD Intercept?
    14. 14. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED14Who Does NORAD Intercept?• Pilots just like you! - Obama golf trip• 78% of TFR violations are General Aviation pilots• Most common causes– Pilot error – incomplete preflight planning– Navigation or communications failures
    15. 15. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED15– Presidential Travel *– Special Events *– Stadium– Disaster/Hazard– Airshow– Space flightReasons For a TFR
    16. 16. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED18Design• 30nm radius from DCAVOR• Surface to 18K’Special Training Requiredfor VFR flight w/in 60 NMProcedures• Two way radio comm• Discrete code• IFR/SFRA flight plan• Airspeed restrictionWashington DC Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA)
    17. 17. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED19Camp David• Prohibited area P-40– 3nm radius– 24 / 7 / 365• When President present– 10nm radius TFR
    18. 18. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED20Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ)• Procedure– Gulf of Mexico– Bahamas corridor• Procedures– File IFR or DVFRflight plan– 2 way radio contact– Discrete code– Advise ATC ofpenetration 15 minprior
    19. 19. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED21Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ)• File IFR or DVFR flight plan• Activate flight plan– Nassau or Miami FSS• Contact Miami Center– Provide ETA for ADIZ pen– Obtain discrete trans code• 15 min from ADIZ?– 25nm if 100kts– 45nm if 180kts
    20. 20. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED22How To Avoid Being Intercepted
    21. 21. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED23How To Avoid Being Intercepted
    22. 22. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED24How To Avoid Being Intercepted
    23. 23. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED25Thorough Flight Planning• Get route brief at 1-800-WX-BRIEF– Weather– NOTAMs– Ask about TFRs!How To Avoid TFRs
    24. 24. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED26Check online:• tfr.faa.gov• Twitter: @VIP_TFR• NBAA or AOPA sites• Smart phone, iPadHow To Avoid TFRs
    25. 25. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED27http://tfr.faa.gov
    26. 26. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED29http://tfr.faa.gov
    27. 27. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED30http://tfr.faa.gov
    28. 28. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED31http://tfr.faa.gov
    29. 29. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED32• TFR format contains:– Location of TFR– Effective period– Defined area– Altitude restrictions– FAA facility and phone– Reason for TFR– Relief agency– Other appropriate infoTFR Format
    30. 30. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED33Review TFRs on Twitter!@VIP_TFR (VIP TFRs only)How To Avoid TFRs
    31. 31. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED34NBAA website and email alertsHow To Avoid TFRs
    32. 32. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED35Use AOPA website and email alertsHow To Avoid TFRs
    33. 33. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED36Review NOTAMS:http://www.faa.gov/pilots/flt_plan/notams/How To Avoid TFRs
    34. 34. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED37Just checking NOTAMs doesn’t clearly show TFRs !DEN 04/028 (KDEN A3038/13) DEN RWY 17R/35L FICON SAFETY AREA RUTS E SHOULDERABEAM TWY M10 WEF 1304021502-1304142359 !DEN 04/024 (KDEN A3036/13) DEN TWY F CLSD N OF TWY F7 WEF 1304021800-1304022100 !DEN 04/023 (KDEN A3035/13) DEN RWY 16L/34R CLSD WEF 1304021800-1304022100 !DEN 04/022 (KDEN A3034/13) DEN SVC TERMINAL AREA RADAR/SECONDARYSURVEILLANCE RADAR OTS WEF 1304050500-1304051100 !DEN 04/012 DEN AIRSPACE SEE FDC 3/8738 ZDV 91.141 WEF 1304031915-1304032245 !DEN 03/788 (KDEN A3013/13) DEN TWY CN SAFETY AREA RUTS N SHOULDER ABEAM TWYH WEF 1303301959-1304302359 !DEN 03/787 DEN AD BIRD ACTIVITY INCREASED FLOCKING WATERFOWL WEF 1303301844-1306302359 !DEN 03/778 (KDEN A2994/13) DEN TWY ZS FICON RUTS ADJ SOUTH BTN TWY F, G WEF1303291800-1304052359 !DEN 03/776 (KDEN A2992/13) DEN TWY F FICON RUTS ADJ EAST BTN TWY AN, BS WEF1303291809-1304052359 !DEN 03/466 (KDEN A2540/13) DEN RWY 25 CLSD LNDG NIGHT WEF 1303182255-1305302359 !DEN 03/458 DEN OBST CRANE 5311 (150 AGL) 0.52 SW (39509N104440W) APCH END RWY 7FLAGGED/LGTD WEF 1303181213-1305050600 !DEN 03/372 DEN OBST CRANE 5689 (323 AGL) 0.6 NE (395050N1044024W) APCH END RWY 25FLAGGED/LGTD WEF 1303121822-1308120600www.faa.gov/pilots/flt_plan/notams/
    35. 35. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED38Just checking NOTAMs doesn’t clearly show TFRs !DEN 04/028 (KDEN A3038/13) DEN RWY 17R/35L FICON SAFETY AREA RUTS E SHOULDERABEAM TWY M10 WEF 1304021502-1304142359 !DEN 04/024 (KDEN A3036/13) DEN TWY F CLSD N OF TWY F7 WEF 1304021800-1304022100 !DEN 04/023 (KDEN A3035/13) DEN RWY 16L/34R CLSD WEF 1304021800-1304022100 !DEN 04/022 (KDEN A3034/13) DEN SVC TERMINAL AREA RADAR/SECONDARYSURVEILLANCE RADAR OTS WEF 1304050500-1304051100 !DEN 04/012 DEN AIRSPACE SEE FDC 3/8738 ZDV 91.141 WEF 1304031915-1304032245 !DEN 03/788 (KDEN A3013/13) DEN TWY CN SAFETY AREA RUTS N SHOULDER ABEAM TWYH WEF 1303301959-1304302359 !DEN 03/787 DEN AD BIRD ACTIVITY INCREASED FLOCKING WATERFOWL WEF 1303301844-1306302359 !DEN 03/778 (KDEN A2994/13) DEN TWY ZS FICON RUTS ADJ SOUTH BTN TWY F, G WEF1303291800-1304052359 !DEN 03/776 (KDEN A2992/13) DEN TWY F FICON RUTS ADJ EAST BTN TWY AN, BS WEF1303291809-1304052359 !DEN 03/466 (KDEN A2540/13) DEN RWY 25 CLSD LNDG NIGHT WEF 1303182255-1305302359 !DEN 03/458 DEN OBST CRANE 5311 (150 AGL) 0.52 SW (39509N104440W) APCH END RWY 7FLAGGED/LGTD WEF 1303181213-1305050600 !DEN 03/372 DEN OBST CRANE 5689 (323 AGL) 0.6 NE (395050N1044024W) APCH END RWY 25FLAGGED/LGTD WEF 1303121822-1308120600www.faa.gov/pilots/flt_plan/notams/
    36. 36. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED39Know applicable ATC frequenciesHow To Avoid TFRs• Charts– Sectional– Hi/Low• GPSdatabase• FSS• Emergency– 121.5
    37. 37. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED40Know lost communication procedures• 7500 – Hijack• 7600 – Lost Comm (radio failure)• 7700 – EmergencyHow To Avoid TFRs
    38. 38. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED41Review lost communication procedures• 7500 – Hijack• 7600 – Lost Comm (radio failure)• 7700 – Emergency• 75 taken alive, 76 technical glitch, 77 going to heavenHow To Avoid TFRs
    39. 39. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED42Review lost communication procedures• 7500 – Hijack• 7600 – Lost Comm (radio failure)• 7700 – Emergency• 75 taken alive, 76 technical glitch, 77 going to heaven• Hi Jack, can’t talk now, I’m on fireHow To Avoid TFRs
    40. 40. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED43• File a flight plan– IFR, DVFR, SVFR, or VFR• Use current charts/sectionals• Update iPad and GPS databaseHow To Avoid TFRs
    41. 41. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED44DURING FLIGHT• Activate flight plan• Talk to ATC• Squawk assigned discrete transponder code• Monitor 121.5 on back-up radio• Get TFR updates from FSSHow To Avoid TFRs
    42. 42. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED45Review intercept proceduresAIM 5-6-2: http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/How To Avoid TFRs
    43. 43. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED46Review Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ)procedures if flying into U.S. from abroad:http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/ifim/airspace/ADIZ Penetration
    44. 44. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED47Review Washington D.C. Special Flight Area (SFRA)procedures if flying within 60 nm of KDCA:https://faasafety.gov/Washington DC SFRA
    45. 45. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED48• Training required to fly w/in 60nm• FAA Safety web site – www.faasafety.gov• 1-2 hours to completeWashington DC Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA)
    46. 46. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED49Review Prohibited / Restricted / MOA airspacealong route: www.seeandavoid.orgHow To Avoid Other Special Use Airspace
    47. 47. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED50• Re-check for TFRs after that $100 hamburger• Departing VFR from airport in TFR’s outer circle– Call FSS and the ATC phone number before launch,possibly obtain squawk• Camping for a week, now flying home– Try ATC on the ground (cell phone, radio)– Try FSS on the ground (cell phone, radio– Call ATC/FSS once airborneHow To Avoid TFRs - GOTCHAS
    48. 48. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED51• If not flying a straight route, make sure FSS is awareof your planned route• iPads might not have updated times if TFR extends• Don’t cancel IFR and squawk 1200 in TFRHow To Avoid TFRs - GOTCHAS
    49. 49. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED52Phases Of An Intercept• Radio Calls• Scramble of Fighters• Intercept• Guide
    50. 50. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED53• ATC will attempt radio contact for an aircraft ofinterest– Assigned ATC frequency– VHF and UHF Guard frequency (121.5 or 243.0)• Other methods– Corporate Operations (ACARS, cell phone, etc)– Other aircraft relay• Come up on frequency– Comply with ATC instructionsRadio Contact Procedures
    51. 51. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIEDALL aircraft operating in US national airspace are highlyencouraged to maintain a listening watch on VHF/UHFGuard (121.5/243.0 Mhz).If subjected to military intercept, it is incumbent on civilian aviators tocomply with ICAO standard signals relayed from the interceptingaircraft. Specifically, aviators are expected to contact air traffic controlwithout delay (if able) on the local operating frequency or on VHF/UHFguard frequencies (121.5/243.5)Noncompliance may result in the useof force– Reference: FAA AIM 5-6-254Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM)
    52. 52. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED‹#›
    53. 53. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED56Interceptor scrambledICAO Intercept Procedure – Intercept Aircraft– Approach from the stern– Two interceptors• see one– Left so PIC can see– Interceptor rocks wings• signal intercept– Safe separation is theresponsibility of theInterceptor– Only get as close asnecessary to complete themissionClick to play video clip
    54. 54. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED57Canadian CF-18NORAD Interceptor AircraftUSAF F-22USAF F-16USAF F-15
    55. 55. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED58– Remain predictable• Altitude, heading, airspeed– Don’t descend– Acknowledge Interceptor with wingrock– Talk to ATC– Acknowledge Interceptor on radio(121.5 or 243.0 MHz)ICAO Intercept Procedure – Intercepted Aircraft“This is the armed air defense fighter on your left wing, youare ordered to… turn to heading XXX immediately to exitrestricted airspace.”
    56. 56. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED59ICAO Intercept Procedure – Intercepted AircraftClick to play video clipPost Intercept, “Follow me”Comply with Interceptor (visual or verbal)directions– Fighter will set direction/heading
    57. 57. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED60ICAO Intercept Procedure – Intercepted AircraftPost Intercept, Landing– TSA and FAA decide if youmust land– FAA selects a suitable airfieldLand where directed– Fighter will circle over head untilyou safely land
    58. 58. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED61ICAO Intercept Procedure – Intercepted AircraftPost Intercept, NO RADIOInterceptor Signals MeaningFighter slow turn to desiredheadingFLY THIS WAYFighter abrupt turn across noseto desired heading and maydispense flaresWARNING: TURN NOW(DIRECTION OF FIGHTER)Fighter circles airport, lowerslanding gear, overflies runway indirection of landingLAND HERE
    59. 59. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED62…“If you do not follow these instructions,you may be fired upon.”Interceptor Procedure – DivertClick to play video clip• Interceptor may dispense flares directingimmediate compliance is required• Failure to comply at this point is notrecommended
    60. 60. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED63Light signalsICAO Intercept Procedure – NightInterceptorsignalMeaning InterceptedsignalMeaningFlash nav Intercepted Flash nav lt Will complyLanding light Land here Landing light Will complyFlash land lt AirportinadequateAll lightsregularCan notcomplyAll lightsirregularDistress
    61. 61. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED64Interceptor Procedure – Helicopter• Helicopter may approachfrom any azimuth• Close to inspect on your leftor right side• Helicopter rocks to signalintercept
    62. 62. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED65Interceptor Procedure – HelicopterHelicopter Signaling Device– Digital signboard on side of the helo– Comply with directions
    63. 63. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED66Helicopter Signboard Phrases• General– You have been intercepted• Radio Com– Tune Frequency 121.5 Mhz– Contact ATC Immediately• Maneuver messages– Follow me– Reverse course– Fly Heading XXX• Non-Compliant– Your aircraft is in danger• Compliant– After landing contact ATC– After landing await law enforcement– Land at this aerodrome
    64. 64. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED67Washington DC Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA)• Visual Warning System (VWS)– Depart SFRA by turning away from VWSand heart of Washington DC– Contact ATC– VWS is for VFR traffic only! If NORDOwhile IFR, follow std lost comm. proceduresClick to play video clip
    65. 65. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED68Recent news
    66. 66. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED69Summary• Aviation Security is everyones business• We need your help• Every airman should understand:• NOTAM / TFR info prior to flight• Why you may be intercepted• What to do when intercepted
    67. 67. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED70How To Avoid Being Intercepted
    68. 68. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED71Summary• Our booth• Discussion• Swag
    69. 69. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED72FAA Wings Credit and Feedback
    70. 70. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED73UNCLASSIFIEDQuestions?
    71. 71. UNCLASSIFIEDUNCLASSIFIED74

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