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Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built
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Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built

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Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built - Aviation.

Certification Operation of Experimental Amateur Built - Aviation.

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  • <number>
    Note to Presenter:
    This PowerPoint has been developed to support the IS-M-ALS-4.1 FAASTeam Business plan. This PowerPoint may be modified to accommodate the time allowed for the presentation and/or the targeted audience, but should include as much of the information presented in this program as possible to help with awareness and to further mitigate the possibility of accidents involving first flight.
    ________________________________________________________
    The FAA order 8130.2G establishes procedures for accomplishing original and recurrent airworthiness certification of aircraft and related products and articles.
    The procedures contained in this order apply to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) manufacturing aviation safety inspectors (AS I), to FAA airworthiness ASIs, and to private persons or organizations delegated authority to issue airworthiness certificate’s.
  • <number>
    Section 1. General Information 8130.2G
    200. Definition Of The Term “Airworthy” for U.S. Type Certificated (TC) Aircraft.
    Although the term “airworthy” is defined in 14 CFR § 3.5(a), a clear understanding of its
    meaning is essential for use in the FAA’s airworthiness certification program. Below is a
    summary of the conditions necessary for the issuance of an airworthiness certificate. A review
    of case law relating to airworthiness reveals two conditions that must be met for an aircraft to be considered “airworthy.” Title 49, United States Code (49 U.S.C.) § 44704(c) and
    14 CFR § 21.183(a), (b), and (c) state that the following two conditions necessary for issuance of an airworthiness certificate:
    a. The aircraft must conform to its type design. Conformity to the type design is considered
    attained when the aircraft configuration and the engine, propeller, and articles installed are
    consistent with the drawings, specifications, and other data that are part of the TC. This includes
    any supplemental type certificate (STC) and repairs and alterations incorporated into the aircraft.
    b. The aircraft must be in a condition for safe operation. This refers to the condition of the
    aircraft relative to wear and deterioration, for example, skin corrosion, window
    delamination/crazing, fluid leaks, and tire wear.
    Note: If one or both of these conditions are not met, the aircraft would not be
    considered airworthy. Aircraft that have not been issued a TC must meet the
    requirements of paragraph 200b of this order.
  • Amateur builders who contact their local FAA managing office should be advised of the availability of forms and AC 20-27, Certification and Operation of Amateur-Built Aircraft, to assist them in planning their project.
  • <number>
    Design and Construction. The FAA should be reasonable in its requests for design data from amateur builders, keeping in mind that in most instances only one aircraft is involved.
    Accordingly, the amateur builder(s) are not required to have the detailed design data, quality systems, and procedures that holders of type and production certificates are required to have for the serial production of duplicate aircraft. Often, the amateur builder will only have the information provided with the kit. However, the amateur builder should be strongly encouraged to maintain the documentation listed in paragraph 4101e of this order to substantiate the fabrication and assembly process and show compliance with 14 CFR § 21.191(g).
  • <number>
    Advising Applicants. Many individuals who want to build their own aircraft have little or no experience with respect to aeronautical practices, workmanship, or design.
    An excellent source for advice in such matters is the Experiment Aircraft Association (EAA), located in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Information on EAA programs and benefits may be obtained via the EAA website at http://www.eaa.org.
  • <number>
    In-Process Inspections. The FAA usually will not perform in-process inspections for determining airworthiness during the fabrication and assembly process.
    However, the FAA has to make a determination that the aircraft is in a condition for safe operation. Therefore, the amateur builder’s documentation needs to indicate all in-process inspections by knowledgeable persons, such as EAA technical counselors or certificated mechanics. All in-process inspection documentation needs to include dates and names of all person(s) involved.
  • <number>
    Proper Documentation. Amateur builder(s) need to be able to provide adequate and sufficient documentation to detail the construction.
  • <number>
    Comprehensive builder’s logs in any format, to include photographs of all the steps included in each of the listed tasks in the Amateur-Builder Aircraft Fabrication and Assembly Checklist (2009), materials and techniques used in construction, as well as dates, locations, and detailed descriptions.
  • FAA Evaluation of Amateur-Built Aircraft Kits. 8130.2G
    a. General. The FAA performs kit evaluations to determine if an aircraft constructed from a prefabricated kit, following the manufacturer’s instructions, may meet the major portion requirement of 14 CFR § 21.191(g). The FAA does not certify amateur-built aircraft kits or approve kit manufacturers. The outcome of these evaluations must not be construed as meaning the kit is FAA “certified,” “certificated,” or “approved,” and kit manufacturers shall not represent their kits as such.
    (1) The placing of a kit on the FAA List of Amateur-Built Aircraft Kits is not a prerequisite for issuance of an amateur-built airworthiness certification.
    (2) If an aircraft is fabricated and assembled from a kit that does not appear on the List of Amateur-Built Aircraft Kits, the FAA must make a major portion determination at the time of airworthiness certification.
  • Determination of Major Portion. The determination of major portion is made by evaluating the amount of work accomplished by the amateur builder(s) against the total amount of work necessary to complete the aircraft, excluding standard procured items. The major portion of the aircraft is defined as more than 50 percent of the fabrication and assembly tasks, commonly referred to as the “51-percent rule.” An aircraft is not eligible for an experimental amateur-built certificate under 14 CFR § 21.191(g) if the major portion of the aircraft fabrication and assembly tasks are not completed by an amateur builder(s).
  • <number>
    CFR Part 47 Section 47.3 states in part: No person may operate an aircraft that is eligible for registration under 49 U.S.C. 44101-44104, unless the aircraft--(1) Has been registered by its owner;
  • <number>
  • <number>
    Aircraft Inspection. 8130.2G
    The FAA must arrange with the applicant to make the aircraft available for inspection to determine, at a minimum, the following:
    (1) The ID plate meets the requirements of 14 CFR § 45.11(a), as applicable.
    (2) The information on the ID plate matches the information on FAA Form 8130-6 and
    Aeronautical Center Form 8050-3. The pink copy of Aeronautical Center Form AC 8050-1 cannot be used for original certification).
    (3) The aircraft nationality and registration marks are in accordance with 14 CFR part 45, subpart C.
  • <number>
    Ref: FAR 45.11, @ FAR 45.13
  • <number>
  • <number>
    8130.2G 4102 (g)
    Aircraft Inspection. The FAA must arrange with the applicant to make the aircraft available for inspection to determine, at a minimum, the following:
    (1) The ID plate meets the requirements of 14 CFR § 45.11(a), as applicable.
    (2) The information on the ID plate matches the information on FAA Form 8130-6 and Aeronautical Center Form 8050-3. The pink copy of Aeronautical Center Form AC 8050-1 cannot be used for original certification).
    (3) The aircraft nationality and registration marks are in accordance with
    14 CFR part 45, subpart C.
  • <number>
    Code of Federal Regulations Sec. 91.319Part 91 GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULESSubpart D--Special Flight Operations Sec. 91.319Aircraft having experimental certificates: Operating limitations.(a) No person may operate an aircraft that has an experimental certificate--(1) For other than the purpose for which the certificate was issued; or(2) Carrying persons or property for compensation or hire.(b) No person may operate an aircraft that has an experimental certificate outside of an area assigned by the Administrator until it is shown that--(1) The aircraft is controllable throughout its normal range of speeds and throughout all the maneuvers to be executed; and(2) The aircraft has no hazardous operating characteristics or design features.(c) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator in special operating limitations, no person may operate an aircraft that has an experimental certificate over a densely populated area or in a congested airway. The Administrator may issue special operating limitations for particular aircraft to permit takeoffs and landings to be conducted over a densely populated area or in a congested airway, in accordance with terms and conditions specified in the authorization in the interest of safety in air commerce.(d) Each person operating an aircraft that has an experimental certificate shall--(1) Advise each person carried of the experimental nature of the aircraft;(2) Operate under VFR, day only, unless otherwise specifically authorized by the Administrator; and(3) Notify the control tower of the experimental nature of the aircraft when operating the aircraft into or out of airports with operating control towers.[(e) No person may operate an aircraft that is issued an experimental certificate under §21.191 (i) of this chapter for compensation or hire, except a person may operate an aircraft issued an experimental certificate under §21.191 (i)(1) for compensation or hire to- (1) Tow a glider that is a light-sport aircraft or unpowered ultralight vehicle in accordance with §91.309; or (2) Conduct flight training in an aircraft which that person provides prior to January 31, 2010. (f) No person may lease an aircraft that is issued an experimental certificate under §21.191 (i) of this chapter, except in accordance with paragraph (e)(1) of this section. (g) No person may operate an aircraft issued an experimental certificate under §21.191 (i)(1) of this chapter to tow a glider that is a light-sport aircraft or unpowered ultralight vehicle for compensation or hire or to conduct flight training for compensation or hire in an aircraft which that persons provides unless within the preceding 100 hours of time in service the aircraft has- (1) Been inspected by a certificated repairman (light-sport aircraft) with a maintenance rating, an appropriately rated mechanic, or an appropriately rated repair station in accordance with inspection procedures developed by the aircraft manufacturer or a person acceptable to the FAA; or (2) Received an inspection for the issuance of an airworthiness certificate in accordance with part 21 of this chapter. (h) The FAA may issue deviation authority providing relief from the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section for the purpose of conducting flight training. The FAA will issue this deviation authority as a letter of deviation authority. (1) The FAA may cancel or amend a letter of deviation authority at any time. (2) An applicant must submit a request for deviation authority to the FAA at least 60 days before the date of intended operations. A request for deviation authority must contain a complete description of the proposed operation and justification that establishes a level of safety equivalent to that provided under the regulations for the deviation requested. (i) The Administrator may prescribe additional limitations that the Administrator considers necessary, including limitations on the persons that may be carried in the aircraft.]Amdt. 91-282, Eff. 9/1/2004
  • <number>
    Review the following slides with limitations.
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  • <number>
    Some FSDO’s are turning the certifications over to DAR’s depending on work load in the office.
  • <number>
  • <number>
    8130.2G 4102 (g)
    Aircraft Inspection. The FAA must arrange with the applicant to make the aircraft available for inspection to determine, at a minimum, the following:
    (1) The ID plate meets the requirements of 14 CFR § 45.11(a), as applicable.
    (2) The information on the ID plate matches the information on FAA Form 8130-6 and Aeronautical Center Form 8050-3. The pink copy of Aeronautical Center Form AC 8050-1 cannot be used for original certification).
    (3) The aircraft nationality and registration marks are in accordance with
    14 CFR part 45, subpart C.
  • <number>
    Required placard wording.
  • <number>
  • Operating limitations must be designed to fit the specific situation encountered. The ASI may impose any additional limitations deemed necessary in the interest of safety. The ASI and/or designee must review each imposed operating limitation with the applicant to ensure that
    the operating limitations are understood by the applicant.
  • <number>
  • <number>
    The log book entry by the pilot/owner is what authorizes operation of Phase II
  • Here are some items to point out and discuss in regards to a first flight in an Experimental Armature built aircraft.
    Develop a plan to include at a minimum the above items.
  • <number>
  • <number>
    If you don’t Issue the Repairman certificate at time of certification,
    Then who will maintain the aircraft during the flight test phase?
  • 5/24/11 8900.1 CHG 155
    VOLUME 3  GENERAL TECHNICAL ADMINISTRATION
    CHAPTER 11  USE OF AIRCRAFT ISSUED EXPERIMENTAL AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATES IN FLIGHT INSTRUCTION FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE
    SECTION 1  USE OF AIRCRAFT ISSUED EXPERIMENTAL CERTIFICATES IN FLIGHT TRAINING FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE
    B.    Background.
    1)    Section 91.319(a) prohibits the operation of an experimental aircraft for other than the purpose for which the certificate was issued or to carry persons or property for compensation or hire. These restrictions prohibit the widespread use of experimental aircraft for flight training for compensation or hire. The FAA recognizes the value of specialized flight training that may only be available in aircraft holding experimental certificates. In the past, the FAA issued exemptions to § 91.319(a) to allow owners to rent their aircraft for the purpose of providing specialized flight training. To reduce the burden on owners and operators, the FAA published a revision to § 91.319 on July 27, 2004. That revision permits the issuance of a deviation to allow a person to conduct flight training in an aircraft that person provides and to receive compensation for that activity. To provide a streamlined and standardized process for the issuance of deviations to permit this flight training to be conducted, the FAA developed a LODA located in the WebOPSS.
    2)    ASIs may issue flight training deviations using the guidance in this section. ASIs must issue all deviations using the LODA Template A115, Deviation Authority for Conducting Flight Training in Experimental Category Aircraft, found in the part 91 database of the WebOPSS. Use of the WebOPSS will ensure that all deviations have the correct special conditions and provide for national tracking of the deviations. The FAA will issue training deviations to permit the conduct of training that can only be accomplished in aircraft with experimental certificates.
  • <number>
    Subject: Airmen Transition to Experimental or Unfamiliar Airplanes
    Date: 3/30/11
    Initiated by: AFS-800 AC No: 90-109
    PURPOSE. This advisory circular (AC) provides information and guidance to owners and pilots of experimental airplanes and to flight instructors who teach in these airplanes. This information and guidance contains recommendations for training experience for pilots of experimental airplanes in a variety of groupings based on performance and handling characteristics. This AC does not address the testing of newly built experimental airplanes. The current edition of AC 90-89, Amateur-Built Aircraft and Ultralight Flight Testing Handbook, provides information on such testing. However, if a pilot is planning on participating in a flight-test program in an unfamiliar experimental airplane, this AC should be used to develop the skills and knowledge necessary to safely accomplish the test program using AC 90-89. This AC may also be useful in planning the transition to any unfamiliar fixed-wing airplanes, including type-certificated (TC) airplanes.
  • The experimental airplane community is an important part of the civil aviation industry in the United States; some of aviation’s greatest technological achievements were developed by amateur airplane builders. The amateur builder community is foundational to General Aviation (GA) in the United States (U.S.); however, recent trends in experimental airplane accidents have indicated a need for increased effort to ensure the preparation of pilots for the challenges of these airplanes. Historically, experimental airplane flight operations represent a small component of flight hours, but a significant percentage of GA accidents. * LoC (Loss of Control)
  • <number>
  • Transcript

    • 1. Amateur Built Aircraft Certification & Operation Presented by the FAA Safety Team FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration
    • 2. Certification and Operation Guidance concerning building, certification, and operation of amateur-built aircraft. How much fabrication and assembly the builder must do. The FAA’s role in the certification process. FAA order 8130.2G covers Amateur-Built certification. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 2
    • 3. Background FAA provides for the issuance of a Special Airworthiness Certificate Experimental Category Allows for operation of amateur-built aircraft AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 3
    • 4. Background continued • The Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR’s) section 21.191(g) defines an amateur-built aircraft as an aircraft, the major portion of which has been fabricated and assembled by persons who undertook the construction and assembly solely for their own • education or recreation. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 4 4
    • 5. FAA Certification In the Past, the FAA inspected the aircraft at several stages, called Precover Inspections. Since 1983, FAA inspections have been limited to ensuring acceptable workmanship, methods, techniques, and practices are used. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 5
    • 6. FAA Certification In recent years, amateur builders have called upon persons having expertise, such as, EAA Technical Counselors. FAA Designated Airworthiness Representatives (DAR) can be used for technical guidance. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 6
    • 7. Certification Criteria Builders should have knowledgeable persons perform pre-cover and other inspections. Documentation of construction i.e., Builders Log. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 7
    • 8. Design and Construction Consult with the EAA Strongly recommend FAA approved engines, props, wheels, and components Cockpit and Cabin design to include TSO’d restraints AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 8
    • 9. Design and Construction continued Adequate fuel supply for engine Suitable design for reduced fire hazard AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 9
    • 10. Construction Kits • An aircraft built from a kit may be eligible for amateur-built certification, provided the major portion has been fabricated and assembled by the amateur builder. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 10 10
    • 11. Construction Kits continued • This is known as the 51% Rule AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 11 11
    • 12. Construction Kits continued • Caution: Purchasers of partially completed kits should obtain all fabrication and assembly records from the previous owner(s). AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 12 12
    • 13. Construction Kits continued • Advertisements tend to be somewhat vague and may be misleading as to whether a kit is eligible for amateur-built certification. • It is not advisable to order a kit before verifying with the local FAA office if the aircraft, upon completion, may be eligible for certification. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 13 13
    • 14. Aircraft Registration FAR 47 covers registration Apply for your “N” number You can request special “N” numbers You can reserve a special “N” number for one year AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 14
    • 15. Aircraft Registration If a kit was used, submit bill of sale from kit manufacturer FAA Bill of Sale can be used Provide an Affidavit of Ownership for Amateur-Built Aircraft AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 15
    • 16. Identification and Registration Marks FAR 21.182 requires registration to be displayed on the aircraft. FAR 45 states the requirements of the marks. ID plate must be fireproof & secured. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 16
    • 17. Identification and Registration Marks continued Name on ID plate is that of the Builder with any serial number. ID plate must be located on exterior. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 17
    • 18. Identification and Registration Marks continued “N” numbers must be displayed at a minimum height of 3 inches. If max. cruise speed exceeds 180 knots, “N” numbers must be at least 12 inches. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 18
    • 19. Identification and Registration Marks continued “N” numbers may not exceed 5 symbols following the prefix N. One to four numbers and one suffix ie., (N1234B), or One to three numbers and two suffixes ie., (N123BR). AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 19
    • 20. Certification Inspection An FAA Airworthiness Inspector or DAR will conduct an inspection. The applicant will need to show compliance with FAR 91.319. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 20
    • 21. It’s your aircraft – You will also have to determine Airworthiness prior to certification. • Ensure there is a signed and dated statement from the owner in the aircraft records,that the aircraft has had an inspection performed in accordance with 14 CFR part 43, appendix D, or other approved programs, and was found to be in a condition for safe operation. • This statement will support the owner’s inspection and airworthiness statement on block III of FAA Form 8130-6. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 21 21
    • 22. Lets take a look at what the Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 91.319 states! AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 22
    • 23. FAR Part 91.319 continued Para (a) No person may operate an aircraft that has an experimental certificate (1) For other than the purpose for which the certificate was issued; or (2) Carrying persons or property for compensation or hire. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 23
    • 24. FAR Part 91.319 continued Para (b) states: No person may operate an has aircraft that an experimental certificate outside of an area assigned by the Administrator until it is shown that-- AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 24
    • 25. FAR Part 91.319 continued (1) The aircraft is controllable throughout its normal range of speeds and throughout all the maneuvers to be executed; and AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 25
    • 26. FAR Part 91.319 continued (2) The aircraft has no hazardous operating characteristics or design features. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 26
    • 27. FAR Part 91.319 continued (c) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator in special operating limitations, no person may operate an aircraft that has an experimental certificate over a densely populated area or in a congested airway. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 27
    • 28. FAR Part 91.319 continued The Administrator may issue special operating limitations for particular aircraft to permit takeoffs and landings to be conducted over a densely populated area or in a congested airway, in accordance with terms and conditions specified in the authorization in the interest of safety in air commerce. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 28
    • 29. FAR Part 91.319 continued (d) Each person operating an aircraft that has an experimental certificate shall (1) Advise each person carried of the experimental nature of the aircraft; and AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 29
    • 30. FAR Part 91.319 continued (2) Operate under VFR, day only, unless otherwise specifically authorized by the Administrator; and AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 30
    • 31. FAR Part 91.319 continued • (3) Notify the control tower of the experimental nature of the aircraft when operating the aircraft into or out of airports with operating control towers. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 31 31
    • 32. FAR Part 91.319 continued (i) The Administrator may prescribe additional Administrator limitations considers that the necessary, including limitations on the persons that may be carried in the aircraft. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 32
    • 33. FAR Part 91.319 continued Who is the Administrator??? AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 33
    • 34. FAR Part 91.319 continued • Your friendly FSDO Aviation Safety Inspector!!!! AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 34 34
    • 35. Certification Inspection Please contact your FAA Aviation Safety Inspector at least 30 days in advance of your requested inspection. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 35
    • 36. Certification Inspection continued The Inspection will include a review of FAR 21.193, builder’s log, and an examination of the completed aircraft AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 36
    • 37. Successful Aircraft Inspection Furnish a complete and ready to fly aircraft except for cowlings, fairings and opened panels for inspection Aircraft Registration (white Form 8050-3) Builder’s log A log book for the aircraft, engine, and prop AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 37
    • 38. Successful Aircraft Inspection continued Installation of placard, “PASSENGER WARNING - THIS AIRCRAFT IS AMATEUR-BUILT AND DOES NOT COMPLY WITH FEDERAL SAFETY REGULATIONS FOR STANDARD AIRCRAFT” AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 38
    • 39. Issuance of the Special Airworthiness Certificate A Special Airworthiness Certificate will be issued Operating Limitations will be issued: Phase I & Phase II Appropriate Operating Limitations must be onboard aircraft while in operation AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 39
    • 40. Experimental Amateur-Built Operating Limitations • Operating limitations must be designed to fit the specific situation encountered. • The ASI and/or designee must review each imposed operating limitation with the applicant to ensure that the operating limitations are understood by the applicant. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 40 40
    • 41. Operating Limitations Phase I - Flight Test Program Initially limited to assigned area At least 25 hours for (FAA-approved Type Certificated) engine/prop combination At least 40 hours if non approved engine/prop combination AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 41
    • 42. Phase I continued • Not conducted over densely populated areas or in congested airways • usually encompasses 25-statute mile radius • Carrying of passengers will not be permitted AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 42 42
    • 43. Phase II - Permanent Operating Limitations After successful completion of Phase I requirements, and A log book entry stating so; Phase II Operating Limitation become effective and will remain in effect AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 43
    • 44. Showing Compliance to 14 CFR § 91.319(b). • The applicant should be advised that after the experimental amateur-built airworthiness certificate has been issued, they must show compliance to 14 CFR § 91.319(b). • This is done by developing a flight test program that addresses the requirements, goals, and objectives of each test flight. • The flight test program should be developed in accordance with AC 90-89, Amateur-Built Aircraft and Ultralight Flight Testing Handbook, or its equivalent in scope and detail. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 44 44
    • 45. Flight test programs serve two purposes: • (1) They ensure the aircraft has been adequately tested and determined to be safe to fly within the aircraft’s flight envelope. • (2) The flight test data is used to develop an accurate and complete aircraft flight manual and to establish emergency procedures. Note: The EAA Flight Advisor program has been established to assist applicants in developing flight test programs. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 45 45
    • 46. First Flight & Who is going to fly it? • In most cases, the builder will make the first flight. – Things to think about: • • • • • • • • • Proficiency Transition training Currency Airport selection Develop a plan Use a Technical Counselor You must be willing to cancel the flight Emergency preparedness – In the air and on the ground Weather AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 46 46
    • 47. Repairman Certification The aircraft builder may be certificated as a repairman if the builder is the primary builder of the aircraft and can satisfactorily prove requisite skill in operation. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 47
    • 48. Repairman Certification continued This certificate can be obtained by making application to the local FAA FSDO AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 48
    • 49. LODA – Letter of Deviation Authority • The FAA may issue deviation authority providing relief from the provisions of paragraph (a) of 91.319 for the purpose of conducting flight training. The FAA will issue this deviation authority as a letter of deviation authority. • (1) The FAA may cancel or amend a letter of deviation authority at any time. • (2) An applicant must submit a request for deviation authority to the FAA at least 60 days before the date of intended operations. A request for deviation authority must contain a complete description of the proposed operation and justification that establishes a level of safety equivalent to that provided under the regulations for the deviation requested. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 49 49
    • 50. Airmen Transition to Experimental or Unfamiliar Airplanes • See Advisory Circular 90-109 • This advisory circular (AC) provides information and guidance to owners and pilots of experimental airplanes and to flight instructors who teach in these airplanes. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 50
    • 51. Summary • Amateur Built Aircraft crash more often and are more often fatal than Certificated Aircraft • Significant improvements have been made and the historical accident rate is on a downward trend however- we still have room for improvement • Use the resources available to you- EAA/ FAA • Build a simple Risk Management Plan Enjoy this wonderful freedom we have! AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 51 51
    • 52. Amateur-Built Fatal Accidents With 0-5 Airframe Hours LoC on 1st Takeoff LoC on Other Takeoff LoC for Powerloss LoC In-flight Separation Forced Landing 0 2 AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 4 6 8 Federal Aviation Administration 52 10 52
    • 53. Amateur-Built Fatal Accidents With 41-60 Airframe Hours LoC Pilot LoC for Powerloss CFIT Midair In-flight Separation Forced Landing 0 2 4 AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 6 8 10 12 Federal Aviation Administration 53 53
    • 54. Carelessness and overconfidence are usually more dangerous than deliberately accepted risk. - Wilbur Wright, 1901 AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 54 54
    • 55. AMATEUR BUILT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 55

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