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Go-AroundsIf it isn’t rightgo around
We are going to discuss how we teach andWe are going to discuss how we teach andreinforce the value of the go around. A to...
BecauseBecauseWe still have accidents!We still have accidents!Types of Go-Around AccidentsAll Accidents / Fatal AccidentsS...
BecauseBecauseWe still have accidents!We still have accidents!Aircraft involved in Go-Around AccidentsAll Accidents / Fata...
Go-Around=Weakness?Go-Around=Weakness?““Somewhere, somehow a sizeable percentage of theSomewhere, somehow a sizeable perce...
Go-AroundsGo-AroundsExcerpt from AOPA ASF Operations and Proficiency No. 6Excerpt from AOPA ASF Operations and Proficiency...
Go-AroundsGo-AroundsExcerpt from AOPA ASF Operations and Proficiency No. 6Excerpt from AOPA ASF Operations and Proficiency...
FundamentalsFundamentalsLet’s review and discuss the following fundamentalsLet’s review and discuss the following fundamen...
FundamentalsFundamentalsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AWhenever landing conditions are not satisfactory, aWhenever la...
FundamentalsFundamentalsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AThe assumption that an aborted landing is invariablyThe assump...
FundamentalsFundamentalsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AThe go-around is not strictly an emergency procedure.The go-ar...
FundamentalsFundamentalsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3ALike any other normal maneuver, the go-around mustLike any oth...
FundamentalsFundamentalsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AThe flight instructor should emphasize early on, andThe flight...
Rule of AviationRule of Aviation““If, at any time in the approach or landing, right intoIf, at any time in the approach or...
Another Rule of AviationAnother Rule of AviationTreat each approach as though it will conclude with a balkedlanding or mis...
Three Cardinal PrinciplesThree Cardinal PrinciplesThe improper execution of the go around maneuverstems from a lack of fam...
PowerPowerAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3APower is the pilot’s first concern.The instant the pilot decides to go aroun...
AttitudeAttitudeAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AAttitude is always critical when close to the ground,and when power is...
ConfigurationConfigurationAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AIn cleaning up the airplane during the go-around, thepilot s...
ConfigurationConfigurationAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AOne other comment when it comes to configuration.There have ...
What Do You Think?What Do You Think?In the go-around sequence what is the firstobjective?
Consider this thoughtConsider this thoughtOffered by Rich Stowell, MCFI National Flight Instructor of the yearThe first ob...
What Do You Think?What Do You Think?In the go-around sequence "Power - Attitude - Configuration"does "Attitude" always mea...
Consider this thoughtConsider this thoughtOffered by Rich Stowell, MCFI National Flight Instructor of the yearIf we are pr...
What Do You Think?What Do You Think?In the go-around sequence, where does "Communicate" fall?
Consider this thoughtConsider this thoughtOffered by Rich Stowell, MCFI National Flight Instructor of the yearToo many stu...
What Do You Think?What Do You Think?Are there situations where a go-around is not advisable?
Consider this thoughtConsider this thoughtOffered by Rich Stowell, MCFI National Flight Instructor of the yearRare situati...
What Do You Think?What Do You Think?If the go-around is due to other traffic ahead and below (say,someone pulling onto the...
Consider this thoughtConsider this thoughtOffered by Rich Stowell, MCFI National Flight Instructor of the yearOnce the go-...
Common ErrorsCommon ErrorsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A• Failure to recognize a condition that warrants ago-around•...
Common ErrorsCommon ErrorsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A• Improper pitch attitude• Failure to configure the airplane...
Practice Go-AroundsPractice Go-AroundsFeaturing Bob MartensFeaturing Bob MartensThe following is presented as a review of ...
Go-Around ProcedureGo-Around ProcedureFeaturing Bob MartensFeaturing Bob MartensThis discussion is presented as a review o...
• Teaching and reinforcing the value of going aroundTeaching and reinforcing the value of going around• Going around is no...
This presentation would not havebeen possible without the generoushelp and support of the following:Your Forum Facilitator...
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Go Arounds - FAASTeam and SAFE

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  • 2011/04/01-003 (E) PP Objective: The purpose of this forum is to engage instructors in a discussion about go-arounds. A subject that receives very little attention after primary training. Your role is to facilitate the discussion and to engage the audience in this subject area. This is a forum and a workshop for instructors. There may be non-instructors in the audience but the objective is to involve the educators in this subject and to share ideas, opinions and teaching techniques. The dynamic of each audience may be different so it is the role of the facilitator to use this PowerPoint presentation as a guide for discussion and as an outline to make sure that there has been a complete coverage of the subject matter. It will be important to take a census of those present so that you have an idea as to the level of experience of the audience and as to which participants will be helpful as you engage everyone in the dialog. Please note that for the most effective presentation you should rehearse the power point several times to get a sense of the animations and their timings. Seminar Equipment/Supplies: Normal presentation hardware to effectively present the material. There are two audio files near the end of this presentation that will require a reasonable sound system or speakers to be used effectively
  • SCRIPT FOR FORUM/WORKSHOP FACILITATOR: There is no need for a script as the subject matter will lend itself to discussion. The facilitator should use their own experience and knowledge of the group to begin the dialog by simply stating the objective of the forum as noted on the slide. Make it interesting and engaging. The words “so basic and so fundamental” were borrowed from Mark Robidoux who will be the interviewer in a discussion with Bob Martens later in this presentation. PRESENTER ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Airplane Flying Handbook, Chapter 8 (Go-arounds, rejected landings) FAA 8083-3A provided as part of supporting materials
  • Source AOPA Air Safety Foundation 2008 Nall Report (provided as part of your supporting materials) Review this with the group and if there have been any local accidents use as part of the discussion without trying to fix blame. If an NTSB report is available it can serve as further discussion material.
  • Source AOPA Air Safety Foundation 2008 Nall Report (provided as part of your supporting materials) Review this with the group and if there have been any local accidents use as part of the discussion without trying to fix blame. If an NTSB report is available it can serve as further discussion material.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: This comment is part of an article written by Budd Davisson and it is repeated in other sources on the subject of go-arounds. It is likely that you hear this and see examples of it regularly. This should begin a dialog on the whole subject of going around. Copy of article provided for your review as part of subject matter documents. FACILITAOR ACTIONS: Engage the audience
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: The document noted on this slide is provided as part of your supporting documents for this presentation. FACILITATOR ACTIONS: This may be like preaching to the choir but again it does, however, speak to the focus of the workshop. The next slide is a continuation of this thinking so be sure to include it as part of this dialog.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: The document noted on this slide is provided as part of your supporting documents for this presentation. FACILITATOR ACTIONS: This slide will open the discussion to elements of risk with the go-around. Later in this presentation you will focus on the specific elements or cardinal principles of the go-around.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR FACILITATOR: There will probably be little disagreement with the fundamentals that follow this question. They are right out of the Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A. This approach is being used to make sure that we are all in agreement as to what our thinking is and what we are trying to accomplish as aviation educators. FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Transition from this question any way that makes sense for the audience and for the tone of the dialog up to this point.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Group consensus and discussion if necessary
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Group consensus and discussion if necessary
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Group consensus and discussion if necessary
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Group consensus and discussion if necessary
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Ask the group for techniques that they use as part of their teaching process
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: AOPA Flight Training Magazine, September 2005 FACILITATOR ACTIONS: A rule that makes sense…..
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: These thoughts were contributed by Jim Leavitt an FAA Reviewer for the FAAST organization. Once you decide to go around forget landing, it is now a take off. Plan for it as you would any take off with considerations for a potential engine failure and the following items. Especially if it is your first time at a new airport! What does it take to achieve full or max allowable power?          Throttle(s) forward to the allowable position for take off as previously determined          Carburetor heat cold          Propeller(s) max          Mixture(s) full rich or as previously determined to be appropriate for take off          (Yes, all of that should have been done as a result of the app and ldg checklists however, each must be confirmed during a go around to assure maximum thrust)          Pitch up or down to what would be appropriate for take off, as previously determined          Wing configuration set for take off as previously determined          Aircraft go around performance based on the current conditions (gross weight and density altitude primarily)          Terrain and Obstructions to consider? I always suggested to students, especially multi-engine students, that every approach should be expected to conclude with a balked landing or missed approach and planned for accordingly. If a landing can be accomplished safely it's bonus. Knowing what to do when it's time to go around is necessary, being prepared to do so is mandatory. FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Continue to engage the participants in the concept. What do they think? What can they add?
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Now the dialog should begin. Encourage participation and select people in the audience to share their experience. Each of these principals will be covered separately so keep the dialog on topic.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Engage the group. Discussion should include techniques for all types of aircraft and aircraft sophistication. Draw on the experience of the group for the broadest amount of input
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Engage the group. Discussion should include techniques for all types of aircraft and aircraft sophistication. Draw on the experience of the group for the broadest amount of input
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Engage the group. Discussion should include techniques for all types of aircraft and aircraft sophistication. Draw on the experience of the group for the broadest amount of input
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Engage the group. Discussion should include techniques for all types of aircraft and aircraft sophistication. Draw on the experience of the group for the broadest amount of input. If the answer is yes or no pursue it further for more insight.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: The next 12 slides are designed to further the discussion and to draw on wide range of experience and different points of view in the audience. The following consists of six questions and six thoughts from Rich Stowell which are included to further engage the group When you recognize that the group has run out of steam on responding to the question move to the next slide that shares Richs’ thoughts on the point. It is hoped that his thoughts will draw out further discussion. Repeat this process for all six questions.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: The next 12 slides are designed to further the discussion and to draw on wide range of experience and different points of view in the audience. The following consists of six questions and six thoughts from Rich Stowell which are included to further engage the group When you recognize that the group has run out of steam on responding to the question move to the next slide that shares Richs’ thoughts on the point. It is hoped that his thoughts will draw out further discussion. Repeat this process for all six questions.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: The next 12 slides are designed to further the discussion and to draw on wide range of experience and different points of view in the audience. The following consists of six questions and six thoughts from Rich Stowell which are included to further engage the group When you recognize that the group has run out of steam on responding to the question move to the next slide that shares Richs’ thoughts on the point. It is hoped that his thoughts will draw out further discussion. Repeat this process for all six questions.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: The next 12 slides are designed to further the discussion and to draw on wide range of experience and different points of view in the audience. The following consists of six questions and six thoughts from Rich Stowell which are included to further engage the group When you recognize that the group has run out of steam on responding to the question move to the next slide that shares Richs’ thoughts on the point. It is hoped that his thoughts will draw out further discussion. Repeat this process for all six questions.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: The next 12 slides are designed to further the discussion and to draw on wide range of experience and different points of view in the audience. The following consists of six questions and six thoughts from Rich Stowell which are included to further engage the group When you recognize that the group has run out of steam on responding to the question move to the next slide that shares Richs’ thoughts on the point. It is hoped that his thoughts will draw out further discussion. Repeat this process for all six questions.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: The next 12 slides are designed to further the discussion and to draw on wide range of experience and different points of view in the audience. The following consists of six questions and six thoughts from Rich Stowell which are included to further engage the group When you recognize that the group has run out of steam on responding to the question move to the next slide that shares Richs’ thoughts on the point. It is hoped that his thoughts will draw out further discussion. Repeat this process for all six questions.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: The next 12 slides are designed to further the discussion and to draw on wide range of experience and different points of view in the audience. The following consists of six questions and six thoughts from Rich Stowell which are included to further engage the group When you recognize that the group has run out of steam on responding to the question move to the next slide that shares Richs’ thoughts on the point. It is hoped that his thoughts will draw out further discussion. Repeat this process for all six questions.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: The next 12 slides are designed to further the discussion and to draw on wide range of experience and different points of view in the audience. The following consists of six questions and six thoughts from Rich Stowell which are included to further engage the group When you recognize that the group has run out of steam on responding to the question move to the next slide that shares Richs’ thoughts on the point. It is hoped that his thoughts will draw out further discussion. Repeat this process for all six questions.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: The next 12 slides are designed to further the discussion and to draw on wide range of experience and different points of view in the audience. The following consists of six questions and six thoughts from Rich Stowell which are included to further engage the group When you recognize that the group has run out of steam on responding to the question move to the next slide that shares Richs’ thoughts on the point. It is hoped that his thoughts will draw out further discussion. Repeat this process for all six questions.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: The next 12 slides are designed to further the discussion and to draw on wide range of experience and different points of view in the audience. The following consists of six questions and six thoughts from Rich Stowell which are included to further engage the group When you recognize that the group has run out of steam on responding to the question move to the next slide that shares Richs’ thoughts on the point. It is hoped that his thoughts will draw out further discussion. Repeat this process for all six questions.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Straight out of the Airplane Flying Handbook. Ask the group what techniques they use to correct these errors
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Straight out of the Airplane Flying Handbook. Ask the group what techniques they use to correct these errors. Are there any errors that people see that are not discussed here?
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Pilot Workshops.com sends out weekly tips for pilots. This excerpt and the next are from their Airmanship Series on CD (Straight Talk on Go-Arounds). This audio file and the one on the next slide are well done and are excellent summaries of what has been discussed by the group. Copies of the text for each of these is included in the presentation materials as are the mp3 clips. When you move to this file you will have a moment to introduce what is about to be heard as it will start automatically. Bob Martens is a nationally known speaker, consultant and aviation safety expert. He retired from the FAA after spending 17 years as a Safety Program Manager. In this role he delivered hundreds of live seminars devoted to General Aviation Safety. Bob retired from the USAF (rank of Colonel) in 2000 after 30 years of active and reserve duty. He was an aircraft commander in a C-5A and also served as Flying Safety Officer and Chief of Safety with the 439 th Air Wing. Bob has logged thousands of flight hours in both military and GA aircraft. FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Sit back and listen and gauge the room as to their response to what they are hearing.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION FOR WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR: Pilot Workshops.com sends out weekly tips for pilots. This audio file and the one on the next slide are well done and are excellent summaries of what has been discussed by the group. Copies of the text for each of these is included in the presentation materials as are the mp3 clips. Wen you move to this file you will have a moment to introduce what is about to be heard as it will start automatically. FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Sit back and listen and gauge the room as to their response to what they are hearing
  • WORKSHOP/FORUM FACILITATOR ACTIONS: Heading and first bullet come up automatically. Click for each new common student error to continue discussion – 5 bullets under main heading. FACILITATOR NOTES: These bullets summarize the workshop as a conclusion. Presenter should add any other remarks appropriate to close the session.
  • THIS SLIDE: Acknowledgments PRESENTER: Thank the many hard working volunteers who make this and other free educational forums possible! Be sure to acknowledge the host of the event. NEXT SLIDE: Quiz CLICK TO PROCEED TO NEXT SLIDE
  • The Facilitator should us this time to ask for comments, constructive criticism or any other feedback.
  • Transcript of "Go Arounds - FAASTeam and SAFE"

    1. 1. Go-AroundsIf it isn’t rightgo around
    2. 2. We are going to discuss how we teach andWe are going to discuss how we teach andreinforce the value of the go around. A topicreinforce the value of the go around. A topic“so basic and so fundamental” why would“so basic and so fundamental” why wouldwe focus attention on this maneuver?we focus attention on this maneuver?Go-AroundsGo-Arounds
    3. 3. BecauseBecauseWe still have accidents!We still have accidents!Types of Go-Around AccidentsAll Accidents / Fatal AccidentsStallsStalls 17 (42.5%) 5 (55.6%)Loss ofLoss of directional controldirectional control 11 (27.5%) 3 (33.3%)DelayedDelayed go-around attemptgo-around attempt 7 (17.5%) 1 (11.1%)AircraftAircraft ConfigurationConfiguration 2 (12.5%) 0AOPA Air Safety Foundation 2008 Nall Report
    4. 4. BecauseBecauseWe still have accidents!We still have accidents!Aircraft involved in Go-Around AccidentsAll Accidents / Fatal AccidentsAccidents / Fatal AccidentsSE FixedSE Fixed 24 (60%) 2 (22.2%)SE ComplexSE Complex 13 (32.5%) 6 (66.7%)MultiengineMultiengine 3 (7.5%) 1 (11.1%)AOPA Air Safety Foundation 2008 Nall Report
    5. 5. Go-Around=Weakness?Go-Around=Weakness?““Somewhere, somehow a sizeable percentage of theSomewhere, somehow a sizeable percentage of thepilot population got it into their heads that goingpilot population got it into their heads that goingaround was a sign of weakness and they were likely toaround was a sign of weakness and they were likely tobe criticized for it.” You may be questioned as to whybe criticized for it.” You may be questioned as to whyyou didnyou didn’’t, or why you waited too long to go-around.t, or why you waited too long to go-around.But you should never be criticized for the decision to goBut you should never be criticized for the decision to goaround.around.“Going, going, go around “ Budd Davisson AOPA Flight Training Magazine, September 2005
    6. 6. Go-AroundsGo-AroundsExcerpt from AOPA ASF Operations and Proficiency No. 6Excerpt from AOPA ASF Operations and Proficiency No. 6If you have a problem during approach or landing,there’s almost always a simple solution: Go around!It’s far better to make another trip around the patternthan to push ahead and risk a runway overshoot or lossof control.
    7. 7. Go-AroundsGo-AroundsExcerpt from AOPA ASF Operations and Proficiency No. 6Excerpt from AOPA ASF Operations and Proficiency No. 6A lot of pilots seem to forget that it’s an option, and end upA lot of pilots seem to forget that it’s an option, and end uphaving accidents they could easily have avoided. That said, therehaving accidents they could easily have avoided. That said, thereare some risks involved with go-arounds. Especially at loware some risks involved with go-arounds. Especially at lowaltitudes and airspeeds, with flaps down, going around can be aaltitudes and airspeeds, with flaps down, going around can be a“touchy” maneuver:“touchy” maneuver:If you don’t feel comfortable, get some practice with a CFIIf you don’t feel comfortable, get some practice with a CFI..
    8. 8. FundamentalsFundamentalsLet’s review and discuss the following fundamentalsLet’s review and discuss the following fundamentalsand see if we can agree on these as part of our go-and see if we can agree on these as part of our go-around training philosophy.around training philosophy.
    9. 9. FundamentalsFundamentalsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AWhenever landing conditions are not satisfactory, aWhenever landing conditions are not satisfactory, ago-around is warranted.go-around is warranted.
    10. 10. FundamentalsFundamentalsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AThe assumption that an aborted landing is invariablyThe assumption that an aborted landing is invariablythe consequence of a poor approach, which in turn isthe consequence of a poor approach, which in turn isdue to insufficient experience or skill,due to insufficient experience or skill, is a fallacyis a fallacy..Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A
    11. 11. FundamentalsFundamentalsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AThe go-around is not strictly an emergency procedure.The go-around is not strictly an emergency procedure.It is a normal maneuver that may at times be used in anIt is a normal maneuver that may at times be used in anemergency situation.emergency situation.Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A
    12. 12. FundamentalsFundamentalsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3ALike any other normal maneuver, the go-around mustLike any other normal maneuver, the go-around mustbe practiced and perfected.be practiced and perfected.Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A
    13. 13. FundamentalsFundamentalsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AThe flight instructor should emphasize early on, andThe flight instructor should emphasize early on, andthe student pilot should be made to understand, thatthe student pilot should be made to understand, thatthe go-around maneuver is an alternative to anythe go-around maneuver is an alternative to anyapproach and/or landing.approach and/or landing.Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A
    14. 14. Rule of AviationRule of Aviation““If, at any time in the approach or landing, right intoIf, at any time in the approach or landing, right intofinal flare, you feel as if it isnfinal flare, you feel as if it isn’’t right, go around. Simplet right, go around. Simpleas that: if it isnas that: if it isn’’t right go”.t right go”.“Going, going, go around “ Budd Davisson AOPA Flight Training Magazine, September 2005
    15. 15. Another Rule of AviationAnother Rule of AviationTreat each approach as though it will conclude with a balkedlanding or missed approach and plan for this outcomeaccordingly.Once you decide to go around forget landing, it is now a takeoff. Plan for it as you would any take off with considerationsfor a potential engine failure, terrain and obstructionclearance, density altitude and other performance factors.One instructor phrased it this way to his students." Knowingwhat to do when its time to go around is necessary, beingprepared to do so is mandatory.
    16. 16. Three Cardinal PrinciplesThree Cardinal PrinciplesThe improper execution of the go around maneuverstems from a lack of familiarity with the three cardinalprinciples of the procedure:Power, Attitude, and Configuration.How do you teach these principles?Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A
    17. 17. PowerPowerAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3APower is the pilot’s first concern.The instant the pilot decides to go around, full ormaximum allowable takeoff power must be appliedsmoothly and without hesitation, and held until flyingspeed and controllability are restored.
    18. 18. AttitudeAttitudeAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AAttitude is always critical when close to the ground,and when power is added, a deliberate effort on thepart of the pilot will be required to keep the nose frompitching up prematurely.
    19. 19. ConfigurationConfigurationAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AIn cleaning up the airplane during the go-around, thepilot should be concerned first with flaps and secondlywith the landing gear (if retractable).When the decision is made to perform a go-around,takeoff power should be applied immediately and thepitch attitude changed so as to slow or stop thedescent.
    20. 20. ConfigurationConfigurationAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3AOne other comment when it comes to configuration.There have been some accidents where the pilotexecuted a go-around with full flaps. This action was acontributing factor to an accident.Do you introduce or demonstrate a full flap go-aroundto your students?
    21. 21. What Do You Think?What Do You Think?In the go-around sequence what is the firstobjective?
    22. 22. Consider this thoughtConsider this thoughtOffered by Rich Stowell, MCFI National Flight Instructor of the yearThe first objective is to "stop the descent". Ultimately we want to go fromThe first objective is to "stop the descent". Ultimately we want to go fromdescending to climbing. But it doesnt have to be one-to-the-other, all-or-descending to climbing. But it doesnt have to be one-to-the-other, all-or-nothing in one fell swoop. We want to go-around under control at all times.nothing in one fell swoop. We want to go-around under control at all times.Thus, we could break the go-around into distinct baby steps:Thus, we could break the go-around into distinct baby steps: Add slow flight power and pitch to level slow flight;Add slow flight power and pitch to level slow flight; Add takeoff power and pitch to the appropriate climb attitude.Add takeoff power and pitch to the appropriate climb attitude.The point is that if we are making the decision to go-around sooner ratherThe point is that if we are making the decision to go-around sooner ratherthan later which will allow us plenty of time to stage the go-aroundthan later which will allow us plenty of time to stage the go-aroundsequence and maintain precise control throughout.sequence and maintain precise control throughout.
    23. 23. What Do You Think?What Do You Think?In the go-around sequence "Power - Attitude - Configuration"does "Attitude" always mean "Pull back" to establish the climbattitude?
    24. 24. Consider this thoughtConsider this thoughtOffered by Rich Stowell, MCFI National Flight Instructor of the yearIf we are properly trimmed while at low power setting on theIf we are properly trimmed while at low power setting on theapproach, establishing the proper "Attitude" will likely requireapproach, establishing the proper "Attitude" will likely requireforward elevator pressure as power/slipstream effectsforward elevator pressure as power/slipstream effectsthemselves could over-rotate the nose beyond the requiredthemselves could over-rotate the nose beyond the requiredclimb attitude. So we may actually need forward elevatorclimb attitude. So we may actually need forward elevatorpressure during the go-around until we get to "Configuration --pressure during the go-around until we get to "Configuration --re-trim the aircraft".re-trim the aircraft".
    25. 25. What Do You Think?What Do You Think?In the go-around sequence, where does "Communicate" fall?
    26. 26. Consider this thoughtConsider this thoughtOffered by Rich Stowell, MCFI National Flight Instructor of the yearToo many students/pilots rush to announce "N12345 going around" whenToo many students/pilots rush to announce "N12345 going around" whenthey should be busy Aviating (Power - Attitude - Configuration) andthey should be busy Aviating (Power - Attitude - Configuration) andNavigating (working themselves back up and into the pattern). Fly theNavigating (working themselves back up and into the pattern). Fly theairplane first, dont worry about talking until you have everything elseairplane first, dont worry about talking until you have everything elseyoure supposed to do 100% under control.youre supposed to do 100% under control.Communicating clearly that you are going around is important but it is theCommunicating clearly that you are going around is important but it is thelast priority.last priority. Aviate,Aviate, Navigate,Navigate, CommunicateCommunicate
    27. 27. What Do You Think?What Do You Think?Are there situations where a go-around is not advisable?
    28. 28. Consider this thoughtConsider this thoughtOffered by Rich Stowell, MCFI National Flight Instructor of the yearRare situations, but yes:Rare situations, but yes:One-way back country airstripsOne-way back country airstrips (you must land one way or the(you must land one way or theother -- controlled or crashed -- because going around will killother -- controlled or crashed -- because going around will killyou). Smoke/fire in the cockpit (maybe best to get it on theyou). Smoke/fire in the cockpit (maybe best to get it on theground no matter what)?ground no matter what)?Also another consideration would be when the airplane isAlso another consideration would be when the airplane is ononthe runway and there is a loss of directional control orthe runway and there is a loss of directional control orinadequate speedinadequate speed. There have been accidents where damage. There have been accidents where damageand injury were aggravated by going around.and injury were aggravated by going around.
    29. 29. What Do You Think?What Do You Think?If the go-around is due to other traffic ahead and below (say,someone pulling onto the runway in front of us), whatconsiderations should we give to maneuvering on the upwindleg?
    30. 30. Consider this thoughtConsider this thoughtOffered by Rich Stowell, MCFI National Flight Instructor of the yearOnce the go-around is well and successfully under way,Once the go-around is well and successfully under way,consider offsetting the upwind climb slightly to the upwind sideconsider offsetting the upwind climb slightly to the upwind sideof the runway to improve your ability to see the traffic climbingof the runway to improve your ability to see the traffic climbingout below you. If the airplanes are matched in terms ofout below you. If the airplanes are matched in terms ofperformance, probably not likely that the airplane underneathperformance, probably not likely that the airplane underneathwill catch up, but lets say the go-around airplane is a Cessnawill catch up, but lets say the go-around airplane is a Cessna150 and the traffic that cut you off is a pilot in an Extra 300 who150 and the traffic that cut you off is a pilot in an Extra 300 whohas a penchant for rapid and steep pull-ups. Would want tohas a penchant for rapid and steep pull-ups. Would want tomove over out of the way of THAT!move over out of the way of THAT!
    31. 31. Common ErrorsCommon ErrorsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A• Failure to recognize a condition that warrants ago-around• Indecision• Delay in initiating a go-around• Failure to apply max allowable power in a timelymanner• Abrupt power application
    32. 32. Common ErrorsCommon ErrorsAirplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3A• Improper pitch attitude• Failure to configure the airplane appropriately• Attempting to climb out of ground effect prematurely• Failure to adequately compensate for torque andP-factor
    33. 33. Practice Go-AroundsPractice Go-AroundsFeaturing Bob MartensFeaturing Bob MartensThe following is presented as a review of what we haveThe following is presented as a review of what we havebeen discussing and does an excellent job of presentingbeen discussing and does an excellent job of presentingthe case for teaching and practicing the go-around.the case for teaching and practicing the go-around.Courtesy of PilotWorkshops.com ~Pilot’s Tip of the Week January 14, 2011Courtesy of PilotWorkshops.com ~Pilot’s Tip of the Week January 14, 2011
    34. 34. Go-Around ProcedureGo-Around ProcedureFeaturing Bob MartensFeaturing Bob MartensThis discussion is presented as a review of what weThis discussion is presented as a review of what wehave been discussing regarding how we should teachhave been discussing regarding how we should teachthe procedure of going around.the procedure of going around.Courtesy of PilotWorkshops.com ~Pilot’s Tip of the Week January 20, 2011
    35. 35. • Teaching and reinforcing the value of going aroundTeaching and reinforcing the value of going around• Going around is not a weaknessGoing around is not a weakness• Fundamentals of the go-aroundFundamentals of the go-around• Cardinal principles for executing the procedureCardinal principles for executing the procedure• Common errors associated with the procedureCommon errors associated with the procedureSummarySummaryDuring this workshop, we discussed:During this workshop, we discussed:
    36. 36. This presentation would not havebeen possible without the generoushelp and support of the following:Your Forum FacilitatorFAA Safety Teamwww.FAASafety.govSAFEwww.SafePilots.orgGold Seal Flightwww.GoldSealFlight.comPilot Workshopswww.PilotWorkshop.comMichael Phillips, MCFIAviationInstruction.bizCreated February 2011
    37. 37. Thank youThank you
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