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  • Welcome reading specialists to 3 days of training. Introduce Sophie and instructional specialists.
  • Refer to Outcomes and 4-Day Agenda handout and provide participants with the overview of the week.
  • Welcome and introduction of Trainers Review Ground Rules, Location of Bathrooms, Lunch options, Payroll info. Questions Review outcomes
  • Distribute handout and explain directions. Facilitator provides movement directions and chooses a reading specialist to read a question. TALK TO EACH OTHER! ( 1 minute each)
  • We have compiled a notebook for your reference. It contains documents that you will use through the training and refer back to documents to answer questions that might arise in the first few weeks of school. Have participants turn to the TOC and let them browse the topics covered in the notebook.
  • Process: Take a few seconds to think about what you already know about the role of the reading specialist based on the school/s that you have worked. What are the various roles that you have observed the reading specialist perform? Have participants jot down some thoughts and be prepared to share with the group. On the chart of this handout record participants responses. Then have participants write questions on large post-it notes that they would like answered. Collect and display on the W part of the chart. Hopefully those questions will be answered by the end of this training.
  • Students today are expected to display literacy skills far beyond those measured in the past. As society becomes more reliant on knowledge and information, what it means to be literate is rapidly changing. The success of today’s students depend on how well they can comprehend and thoughtfully use a wide variety of texts; assess the credibility of sources and substance critically; and apply knowledge they gain through reading to personal and professional lives. Due to the growing impact of technology on how we communicate with one another and with the massive amount of information that confronts us daily, the challenge before us is clear, we can not return a simpler more literal world….we must do better at developing better readers . Certified reading specialists are needed in every school and community in order to meet the shared goal of better reading. The expertise of the reading specialist is vital to achieving success for all learners.
  • The list of requirements necessary for the position of reading specialist in MCPS was included in a previous slide about the skills that reading specialists should possess. These requirements are expected of the school based reading specialist because of the growing need to ensure that students are able readers and writers.
  • Let’s take a closer look at the roles or “hats “ worn by reading specialists in MCPS. There are four major responsibilities of a school based reading specialist of Leadership, Professional Development, Instruction, and Assessment. Hats Activity
  • In the role as a school leader, the reading specialist is really the authority the staff and principal, and parents rely on you for your professional expertise for answers to sometime simple and other times complex questions about reading and writing. In this role reading specialists have to be thoughtful decision makers and effective communicators.
  • The reading specialist has the responsibility for the implementation of the reading and writing curriculum of MCPS.Supporting new teachers and making them familiar with all aspects of the reading and writing curriculum for their grade level. Reading specialists often collaborate with the staff development teacher to achieve these goals and also visit classrooms to demonstrate/model lessons and strategies to support teachers and ensure that good first teaching is taking place.
  • Not only do reading specialist visit classrooms to demonstrate a lesson or instructional strategy, but it is vital that teachers are selecting and matching the appropriate texts to their instructional groups.And as needed, reading specialists support instruction by providing short-term reading intervention.
  • A critical role and responsibility in the job of reading specialist is understanding, administering formal and informal assessments.Then taking it a step further and analyzing the assessment data to support teachers in determining how to address the instructional needs of students.
  • Linked to the role of reading specialist are 6 performance standards used to evaluate job effectiveness. The 6 standards are part of the Professional Growth System and should be somewhat familiar to you if you have been a teacher in MCPS system. Review the standards. Ask if there are any questions. We will take a closer look at the performance standards in a future training in the Fall. Standard II is linked to the Instructional role of the reading specialist. Critical to the understanding the BIG picture of reading language arts instruction at the elementary level in MCPS is being able to define Balanced Literacy.
  • Using this PowerPoint break timer This PowerPoint slide uses images, custom animation, and timing to provide a countdown timer that you can use in any presentation. When you open the template, you’ll notice that the timer is set at 00:00. However, when you start the slide show, the timer will start at the correct time and count down by 1-minute intervals until it gets to 1 minute. At that point, it will count down in two 30-seconds intervals to 00:00. To insert this slide into your presentation Save this template as a presentation (.ppt file) on your computer. Open the presentation that will contain the timer. On the Slides tab, place your insertion point after the slide that will precede the timer. (Make sure you don't select a slide. Your insertion point should be between the slides.) On the Insert menu, click Slides from Files . In the Slide Finder dialog box, click the Find Presentation tab. Click Browse , locate and select the timer presentation, and then click Open . In the Slides from Files dialog box, select the timer slide. Select the Keep source formatting check box. If you do not select this check box, the copied slide will inherit the design of the slide that precedes it in the presentation. Click Insert . Click Close .
  • One step toward the balancing act in the role of reading specialist is to understand and be able to articulate the the BIG picture of the reading and writing programs of MCPS. In order to start looking at the BIG picture you have to know about the VSC.
  • Process: Take time for participants to share their thoughts about the VSC.
  • A content scope and sequence for K – 12 in each subject area Standards re-organized Indicators and objectives organized organized by standard Includes assessment limits
  • Review the 7 standards for Reading/Language Arts
  • Note that within each standard specific indicators have been identified by the state of Maryland. Within each indicator, specific objectives focus the instruction. Assessment limits are indicated for Indicators that are assessed on MSA. This defines and limits the expectations of the indicator by grade level. Reference page 63 of the Grade 5 Quarter 1 Instructional Guide Review what each number represents
  • The Montgomery County Public Schools elementary reading/language arts program reflects the integrated nature of a balanced literacy program. The MCPS is aligned to the Voluntary State Curriculum. The elementary reading program provides instruction in the five components of reading: Phonemic Awareness (in Kindergarten and Grade One only), Phonics, Vocabulary, Fluency, and Comprehension and engagement in independent reading. Both reading purposes: Reading for Literary Experience and Reading to Be Informed, receive equal instructional attention. Reading to perform at task is subsumed in reading to be informed.
  • Reading is an interactive process between the reader, the text, and the context for reading. Teachers are expected to teach before, during, and after reading strategies. The lessons in the instructional guides are organized in a Before, During, and After format. Literacy learning requires that adequate instructional time be devoted to developing readers and writers. The daily schedule must reflect a commitment to literacy development. In Kindergarten, now that all Kindergarten programs are FULL day programs Kindergarten teachers should be providing 60 minutes of reading and 30 minutes of writing instruction. Grades 1 and 2 teachers should be providing 140 minutes of reading and writing instruction, 90 minutes for reading and 50 minutes for writing instruction daily. In Grades 3 to 5, teachers should be providing 130 minutes of instruction for reading and writing daily, 90 minutes for reading and 40 minutes for writing. The teaching sequence of model, coach, apply is incorporated in the reading and writing lessons. Assessment comes in many forms -pre-assessment helps to begin planning. For example a primary teacher might dictate a sentence to determine if a group of students have learned sight vocabulary and identify strengths and weaknesses in spelling patterned words or in Grade 4 or 5 students might be pre-assessed on their knowledge of the characteristics of the genre that is the instructional focus for the quarter. Grade 4 Q1 Fables. Formative Assessment(on-going) often occurs at the end of a lesson or series of lessons when teachers check for students’ understanding and/or have students demonstrate what they have learned through an exit card or retelling of the events of a story or respond to a BCR question orally or in writing. Summative Assessments are those measures that show what students have learned for example the MSA Maryland State Assessment. Primary Reading Assessment is both formative in the Fall and Winter and summative in Spring.
  • Writing is the 4 th Standard of the VSC. Writing instruction should occur daily. The three writing purposes: Writing to Express Personal Ideas, Writing to Inform, and Writing to Persuade receive instructional attention for a marking period.
  • Students learn the process of writing and are provided with independent writing to incorporate the focus of the teacher’s mini-lesson for the day. Which may emphasize a trait of writing, or a particular type of writing such as poetry or memoir. The traits of effective writing (Ideas, Organization, Word Choice, Voice, Sentence Fluency, and Conventions) Students writing products are evaluated using a rubric which is provided in the IG. For Grades 1 and 2 there are writing assessments for each quarter also included in the IG.
  • Reference page 1 of the Vocabulary Document
  • reference Page 1 of the Vocabulary Document
  • Distribute handout – Music paragraph What was the problem?
  • Page 2 & 3 of Vocabulary Document Share Out
  • Note that vocabulary occurs before, during and after reading Page 4 of the Vocabulary Document
  • Reference pages 5 & 6 of the Vocabulary Document Browse the suggested list on pages 5 & 6 . Think about what suggestions might already familiar to your teachers.
  • Reference Direct teaching page 5 & 6 Indirect learning page 7 Browse page 7. Think about the power of a teacher read aloud.
  • Your turn - BLIGHT Assessment suggestions – page 7 & 8 of Vocabulary Document Assessment suggestions – page 7 & 8 of Vocabulary Document
  • Category charts posted
  • Provide background and definition using Glossary of Strategies that Promote Equity booklet.
  • Strategies used Day 1 a.m. Teambuilder K-W-L Journal Flexible grouping
  • Provide handout with restaurants
  • Linda Jones
  • Note that we are working on the final outcome this afternoon.
  • Process: Provide participants with the handout of the Guide Assignments for Reading. Have them confirm their assigned section, think about how this info would be helpful to the classroom teacher implementing the guide and as they read to record key words to create a summary statement. Provide reading time. Depending on the size of the audience, have participants share their summary statements in small group or with the whole group.
  • The Appendix for each grade level is a very important resource. It contains information that supports lessons and can be used a a content resource for teachers. Process: Have participants open a grade level Appendix. Turn to TOC. In the Assessment section K-2 teachers can find info re: Primary Reading Assessment instructional implications and running record information Grade 3-5 teachers will also find running record info as well as info on BCRs and other comprehension questions and monitoring the reading progress of students. The next section addresses Differentiation and Accommodation teaching Ell students, and making connections to the William and Mary Program. Oral Language ideas compose a small section in the K-2 Appendices. The Reading section includes K-2 student checklists Book Introductions Genre and Author studies, info on Read Aloud, shared reading, LEA, Guided Reading, planning sheets for guided reading,reading behaviors, guided reading over time and strategies to accelerate readers. Grades 3-5 contains info Genre studies, book intros, read aloud, and guided reading. The next section addresses phonics, word walls, and learning to look at print in K-2, Spelling: Teaching Process is also included in K-Grade 5 appendices Writing: Writer’s workshop, the writing process are detailed, and the 6 traits are explained as well. Setting writing goals, students checklists and 6trait scoring rubric are available in the K-5, 4-5 Appendices have additional information on writer’s notebook which is critical to Grade 4 and 5 writers . Gr.3-5 contain a conventions chart letting teachers know when a convention of writing is introduced and when grade level competency is expected.Listening and speaking checklists are also included in the Gr 3-5. All appendices contain Book Lists, a glossary, and a list of professional resources. Some author studies are located in the Appendices or in the IGs depending on the quarter. Handwriting is addressed in both appendices, more specifically in K-2 with a guide, Gr.3-5 with an explanation of handwriting and approved materials that support handwriting instruction.
  • Process: Read and review Hand out the What Do We Teach at Each Grade Level Each Quarter sheet to participants, have them review and ask any questions.
  • Using this PowerPoint break timer This PowerPoint slide uses images, custom animation, and timing to provide a countdown timer that you can use in any presentation. When you open the template, you’ll notice that the timer is set at 00:00. However, when you start the slide show, the timer will start at the correct time and count down by 1-minute intervals until it gets to 1 minute. At that point, it will count down in two 30-seconds intervals to 00:00. To insert this slide into your presentation Save this template as a presentation (.ppt file) on your computer. Open the presentation that will contain the timer. On the Slides tab, place your insertion point after the slide that will precede the timer. (Make sure you don't select a slide. Your insertion point should be between the slides.) On the Insert menu, click Slides from Files . In the Slide Finder dialog box, click the Find Presentation tab. Click Browse , locate and select the timer presentation, and then click Open . In the Slides from Files dialog box, select the timer slide. Select the Keep source formatting check box. If you do not select this check box, the copied slide will inherit the design of the slide that precedes it in the presentation. Click Insert . Click Close .
  • Provide background and definition using Glossary of Strategies that Promote Equity booklet.

Day 1   8 6 08 Day 1 8 6 08 Presentation Transcript

  • New Elementary Reading Specialist Training August 6, 2008
  • Training Overview
    • Thursday, August 7 th
    • Balanced Literacy
    • Differentiation
    • Guided Reading Over Time
    • Planning for Small Group Reading – Grades 1& 2
    • LUNCH
    • Planning for Small Group Reading – Grades 3-5
    • Meaningful Follow-Up to Small Reading Groups
    • Wednesday, August 6 th
    • Roles and Responsibilities
    • The BIG Picture of Reading and Writing in MCPS
    • System-wide and Formative Reading and Writing Assessments
    • LUNCH
    • Content and Structure of the MCPS Instructional Guides – Appendices and Front Matter
    • Content and Structure of MCPS Instructional Guides in READING – Quarter 1
    • Friday, August 8 th
    • Collaborating for Literacy Leadership – Principal and Reading Specialist Panel
    • Content and Structure of MCPS Instructional Guides in WRITING - Quarter 1
    • LUNCH
    • Reading Specialist Panel
    • Roundtable Discussions
    • Scenarios
  • Today’s Outcomes
    • By the end of the session, reading specialists will be able to:
      • Explain an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the elementary reading specialist in MCPS.
      • Explain an overview of the Reading/Language Arts program in MCPS.
      • Describe and identify the purpose of system-wide and formative reading and writing assessments.
      • Explain the content and structure of the Grade 105 MCPS Instructional Guides in order to support teachers in delivering instruction in reading.
  • Circle of Friends This Mayan pottery is known as the Circle of Friends or Healing Circle . According to myth, ancient man gathered around a new fire to celebrate peace and brotherhood among tribes.
  • Training Resources New Reading Specialist Notebook Leadership Professional Development Instruction Assessment
  • The Role of the Reading Specialist Think about the many different roles you have observed reading specialists involved in at the schools you have worked in. What do you already know about the role of a school based reading specialist? What I LEARNED What I WANT to KNOW What I KNOW
  • Qualified Reading Specialists: More Important than Ever ~ Alan Farstrup, Executive Director of IRA 2005
    • Students must be able to:
    • comprehend and thoughtfully use a wide variety of texts
    • assess the credibility of sources and substance critically
    • apply knowledge they gain through reading to their personal and professional lives
    • adapt to the growing impact of technology
  • WANTED: Qualified Reading Specialists in MCPS
    • Classroom teaching experience; with a variety of grade levels
    • Master’s Degree in Reading
    • Strong Leadership skills and experience with professional development
    • Effective written and oral communication skills and use of technology
    • Current understanding of reading/language arts instruction and assessments in MCPS
    • Understanding of content area curriculum
    • Sensitive to the multi-cultural focus
  • The Role of the Reading Specialist Montgomery County Public Schools Professional Development Assessment Instruction Leadership
  • Leadership
    • Meet with Principal and Instructional Leadership Team
    • Coordinate selection, ordering & management of R/LA materials
    • Coordinate school wide reading incentives
    • Participate in EMT, IEP, CAP
    • Parent Communication
  • Professional Development
    • Support curriculum implementation.
    • Support new staff
    • Training
    • Modeling
    • Coaching
    • Planning
    • Collaborate with SDT
  • Instruction
    • Model instructional strategies in the classroom.
    • Assist teachers to match appropriate texts to readers.
    • Provide targeted short-term intervention.
  • Assessment
    • Analyze data for instructional decision-making.
    • Coordinate the administration of county wide assessments.
    • Support teachers to administer and analyze formal and informal reading assessments.
  • Performance Standards         Standard I: Has high expectations for all Standard II: Knows content and communicate it to others Standard III: Maintains a positive climate Standard IV: Uses data to drive decisions Standard V: Pursues professional growth Standard VI: Acts like a professional
  • The Roles of the Reading Specialist
    • Based on my current understanding of the roles of the reading specialist, what are the implications/ expectations for me as a new reading specialist?
  • BREAK
  • The BIG Picture MCPS Reading Writing Grades 1-5
  • Voluntary State Curriculum Turn and Talk to a partner about what you already know about the Voluntary State Curriculum.
  • Voluntary State Curriculum
    • The Voluntary State Curriculum defines what students should know and be able to do at each grade level from Pre-K to Grade 8 in all content areas.
    • The VSC is the document that aligns the Maryland Content Standards and the Maryland Assessment Program.
    What is the VSC and how does it impact instruction in MCPS?
  • Voluntary State Curriculum Reading Standards Standard 1: General Reading Processes Standard 2: Comprehension of Informational Text Standard 3: Comprehension of Literary Text Standard 4: Writing Standard 5: Controlling Language Standard 6: Listening Standard 7: Speaking
  • VSC – Reading Indicators
    • 3.0 Comprehension of Literary Text
    • 3. 5 . A Comprehension of Literary Text : Students will read, comprehend, interpret, analyze and evaluate literary texts.
    • 3.5.A. 6 Determine Important Ideas and Messages
        • 1.5.D.6. d Summarize the text
    • Assessment limits: Sequence of events in the plot or a portion of the plot, including the characters , the conflict , the climax and the resolution
    Standard Grade (MCPS) Indicator Category Indicator Objective
  • MCPS Reading Program, K – 12 “The BIG Picture” MSDE Voluntary State Curriculum NCLB Definition of Reading Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary, Comprehension Reading Purposes Literary Experience/To Be Informed New Reading Specialist Notebook
  • MCPS Reading Program, K – 12 “The BIG Picture” Time Allotment for Instruction Balanced Literacy Block, scheduled class and/or an elective class (Model, Coach, Apply) Assessment Pre-Assessment, Formative, Summative Reading Process Interactive process involving reader, text, and context for reading using Before , During, and After Reading Strategies New Reading Specialist Notebook
  • MCPS Writing Program, K – 12 “The BIG Picture” MSDE Voluntary State Curriculum Writing Purposes , Topics, Audience, Format Structured or Modified Writer’s Workshop (Model, Coach, Apply) New Reading Specialist Notebook
  • MCPS Writing Program, K – 12 “The BIG Picture” Writing Process Prewriting, Drafting, Conferencing, Revising, Editing, Publishing Elements of Effective Writing 6 Traits: Ideas, Organization, Word Choice, Voice, Sentence Fluency, and Conventions Assessment Pre-Assessment, Formative, Summative New Reading Specialist Notebook
  • MCPS Vocabulary Document
    • Vision
    • To support effective vocabulary instruction in all content areas, for all students, to comprehend, apply, express, and communicate understanding in a wide variety of contexts.
    Mission Create a resource that provides support for effective vocabulary instruction K-12 across all content areas. New Reading Specialist Notebook
  • What Does the Research Say? Vocabulary and Equity
    • “ First-grade children from higher SES groups knew about twice as many words as lower SES children.”
    • (Graves & Slater, 1987)
  • What Does the Research Say? Explicit Instruction of Vocabulary “ The pattern of profound and discrepant differences in the number of words for entering K students holds true throughout the school years as evidenced by research at third and twelfth grade unless robust and vigorous vocabulary instruction intervenes to narrow the achievement gap. ” (Beck, 2002)
  • What Does the Research Say? Impact on Reading Comprehension
    • “ The proportion of difficult words in a text is the single most powerful predictor of text difficulty, and a reader’s general vocabulary knowledge is the single best predictor of how well that reader can understand text.”
    • (Nagy, 1988)
  • Let’s Try It!
    • Read the paragraph to determine the meaning of the passage.
    • Turn to a partner to discuss the challenges in the text.
  • Selecting Words to Pre-teach Tier 3 Low frequency Tell the definition Tier 2 High utility words; Need direct instruction Tier 1 Most common words; Rarely require instruction
    • Hurricane OPAL Into the Storm
    • by Carolos Bernardez,
    • illustrated by John Martin
    • Houghton Mifflin Leveled Readers
    Selecting Words To Pre-teach Let’s think aloud the Tier 1, 2 and 3 words page 3
  • Selecting Words to Pre-teach Streets of Gold by Gare Thompson illustrated by Cornelius Van Wright and Ying –Hwa Hu Houghton Mifflin Leveled Reader What words would you identify as Tier 1, 2 and 3 words page 4
  • Before Reading: Teaching Procedure
    • Definition: Rotating means to turn something on it’s axis or center.
    • Say the word together : rotating .
    • Act it out: Demonstrate rotating .
    • Two instances : Ask which might be rotating : a carousel or a desk.
    • In-depth opportunities for ample practice and discussion: If it can rotate , say “ rotate ”, a tree, a wall, the earth, a propeller, a river.
    “ The force of all that mass, rotating violently can be enormous .” Hurricane OPAL - page 3
  • Before Reading: Coaching Teachers
    • As reading specialist, you have just observed the before reading portion of a lesson, did you see and hear intentional teaching of vocabulary?
    Why did you choose those words to introduce before reading?
  • During Reading Active Engagement in Vocabulary
      • Note interesting or unusual vocabulary in a journal or on sticky notes.
      • Consider why tracking a hurricane is a challenge.
      • Draw a picture of rotating.
      • Note words that are explained in the context of the passage.
    Hurricane OPAL: Into the Storm
  • During Reading: Coaching Teachers
    • As reading specialist, you have just observed the during reading portion of a lesson, did you see and hear intentional teaching of vocabulary?
    How might you have reinforced vocabulary during the lesson?
  • After Reading Active Engagement in Vocabulary
      • Categorize the following words:
    Hurricane OPAL: Into the Storm wander whirlpool force spin fierce violent aimless twist power dangerous rotating
  • After Reading: Coaching Teachers
    • As reading specialist, you have just observed the after reading portion of a lesson, did you see and hear intentional teaching of vocabulary?
    Do students have ownership of new vocabulary?
  • Vocabulary Assessment
          • .
    A _________ is (a) _____________ that (is, does) ____________ (critical features). A hurricane is a dangerous and powerful storm that wanders aimlessly for hundreds of miles . One Sentence Summary Hurricane OPAL Into the Storm
  • Components of a Schoolwide Vocabulary Instructional Plan
    • Consensus on the importance of teaching vocabulary.
    • Select and teach Tier II Words.
    • Direct instruction of vocabulary in all content areas.
    • Indirect learning of vocabulary.
    • Assessment reflective of deep understanding.
    • Vocabulary rich classrooms and school environment (includes daily read aloud in every elementary classroom).
  • System-wide and Formative Assessments Puzzle Pieces
    • Work in table groups to solve the assessment jigsaw puzzles in the envelope.
    • Discuss the focus questions:
    How have administrators and teacher used the data provided by each assessment? Which assessments have provided the most useful information? Why?
  • System-wide and Formative Assessments Puzzle Pieces
    • In table groups, determine the purpose for each assessment.
    • Be prepared to talk about your group discussion.
    • Post each completed puzzle under the correct category.
  • Equitable Classroom Practices Equitable classroom practices are those observable teacher behaviors and strategies that ensure that students from all racial ethnic, socio-economic, language and disability groups receive the same consistent messages of high expectation.
  • Do your classroom practices support equity?
    • Instruction and Assessment
    Grouping Students for Success
  • Supporting Equity
    • Review the instructional strategies we have demonstrated this morning Select one strategy . Respond in your journal.
    In what way does this strategy support communicate high expectations in the classroom?
    • Be prepared to share your ideas.
  •  
  • Circle of Friends
    • Thank someone in your new circle of friends who made a difference today by …
    • Supporting your learning
    • Making you feel welcome
    • Encouraging you
    • Sharing a valuable insight
    • Joining you for lunch
    • Making you laugh !
  • Today’s Outcomes
    • By the end of the session, reading specialists will be able to:
      • Explain an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the elementary reading specialist in MCPS.
      • Explain an overview of the Reading/Language Arts program in MCPS.
      • Describe and identify the purpose of system-wide and formative reading and writing assessments.
      • Explain the content and structure of the Grade 1-5 MCPS Instructional Guides in order to support teachers in delivering instruction in reading.
  • MCPS Reading/Language Arts Instructional Guides - Grades 1-5 2005 2005 2003 2004 2004
  • Reading/Language Arts Instructional Guides - Front Matter
    • Locate a partner based on the color of the dot on your 3-day agenda.
    • Skim the assigned pages in the appropriate instructional guide.
    • Scan for pages that would be particularly useful to point out to new teachers. Note these pages in your journal
  • Reading/Language Arts Instructional Guides Pre-K to Grade 5 What’s in the Reading Language Arts Appendix ? Word Study Writing Assessment Accommodating Learners Differentiation Oral Language Reading Handwriting Author Studies Professional Resources Book lists
  • What Do We Teach at Each Grade Level Each Quarter? New Reading Specialist Notebook
  • Supporting Teachers with the Instructional Guides and Appendices
    • How can I use the following resources to make the MCPS curriculum more accessible to teachers, especially new teachers or those new to teaching a grade?
      • Front Matter of the Quarter 1 Guides
      • Appendices
      • “ What Do We Teach Each Quarter?”
      • Quarterly Highlights
  • JIGSAW MCPS Reading/Language Arts Instructional Guides - Grades 1-5
  • Jigsaw Directions – Part 1
    • Individually scan the assigned section of the Quarter 1 Reading/Language Arts Instructional Guide and note the following information on your capture sheet:
      • Key ideas from the overview
      • Major subdivisions within the section
      • Lesson commonalities
      • Other important information
    • Meet with your expert groups and discuss and expand upon the information you noted.
  • BREAK
  • Jigsaw Directions – Part 2
    • Meet with your home group.
    • Take turns sharing the key information discussed in expert group about the grade level Quarter I Reading/language Arts Instructional Guides .
  • Equitable Classroom Practices Equitable classroom practices are those observable teacher behaviors and strategies that ensure that students from all racial ethnic, socio-economic, language and disability groups receive the same consistent messages of high expectation.
  • Do your classroom practices support equity?
    • Instruction and Assessment
    Grouping Students for Success
  • Thinking about Equity How did the use of the jigsaw strategy support your learning of an unfamiliar instructional guide? How were high expectations communicated to you as a learner?
  • Closure
    • Please complete the evaluation in pencil !
    Share your comments... We care what you think!