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Knowledge ManagementKnowledge Management
BY
SoumyaSoumya
Msc ME.dMsc ME.d
SNDP Training College AdimalySNDP Training Colle...
Knowledge Management
Knowledge management is the process
of discovery, acquisition, creation,
dissemination and utilizatio...
Knowledge Management
Knowledge has been recognized as an
important productivity factor for the
organization
Knowledge Management is a discipline
that seeks to improve the performance
of individuals and organisations by
maintaining...
Knowledge Management
 Knowledge Management is a discipline
 Knowledge is shareable in the organisation
 Cultural change...
The more your share, the more you gain.
The knowledge acquisition process should be
part of the work process.
Integrati...
Knowledge Management
Significance of Knowledge Management
Track, measure, share and make use of
intangible assets in an Or...
Knowledge Management
Critical success factors can be categorized as
follows
 Leadership
 Culture
 Structure, roles, and...
Wisdom
Knowledge
Information
Data
 Data – raw facts; numbers
 Information – data in context; readily
captured in documents and databases
 Knowledge – inf...
Knowledge Management
Organisation knowledge is frequently categorised into
•Tacit knowledge – personal; wisdom and experie...
Tacit Knowledge Explicit Knowledge
(Subjective) (Objective)
Knowledge of experience Knowledge of
rationality
(body) (mind)...
Knowledge Management
Key Problems knowledge enterprises face today
are :
 Poor utilization of knowledge
 Information and...
Knowledge Management
Characteristics of KM Implementation Trends
Approaches Adopted :
•Society Centric Approach – Treats k...
Knowledge Management
Typical activities for knowledge
management:
Appointment of Knowledge leader
Creation of knowledge ...
Knowledge sharing
Intellectual asset management
Provide motivation for employees
Identify & improve practises
Reduce ...
•  Knowledge is created through practice,
collaboration, interaction, and
education, as the different knowledge
types are ...
Knowledge production
The three basic means of human knowledge
productions
a)Data acquisition
b)Data information
c)Data und...
 Willingness to collaborate with
knowledge culture.
 Respect & support for integrity of
knowledge.
 Seeking,capture & u...
 Wiig km model
 completeness,connectedness,congruency
 Boisot-I space km model
 codified-uncodified
 Abstract-concret...
 Ikujiro Nonaka and Takeuchi introduced
the SECI model (Nonaka & Takeuchi
1996) which has become the cornerstone
of knowl...
 There are four basic patterns for creating
knowledge in any organization:
1.Socialization: From tacit to tacit
2. Extern...
Socialization Externalization
Internalization Combination
Tacit
knowledge
Explicit
knowledge
Tacit knowledge Explicit know...
 Socialization:Tacit to tacit
Knowledge is passed on through
practice, guidance, imitation, and
observation.
 Externaliz...
Combination: Explicit to explicit
This is the simplest form. Codified
knowledge sources (e.g. documents) are
combined to c...
 Nonoaka, Ikujiro, (1991)“The Knowledge Creating
Company”. Harvard Business Review
 Nonaka, I. & Takeuchi, H. (1995).The...
Knowledge management
Knowledge management
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Knowledge management

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Knowledge management is the process of discovery, acquisition, creation, dissemination and utilization of knowledge for the organization.

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  • Definitions are many and varied. Four main elements
    - explicit: knowledge is explicitly recognised (language, documents etc.)
    - systematic: it is too important to be left to chance
    - selective: there’s lots of knowledge; focus on that which is important
    - content and process perspective (nouns and verbs)
    By adopting a systematic vs. an ad-hoc approach, management consultancies believe they can offer better global solutions, and reduced competitive price pressures (e.g. see Booz Hamilton Allen)
  • Definitions are many and varied. Four main elements
    - explicit: knowledge is explicitly recognised (language, documents etc.)
    - systematic: it is too important to be left to chance
    - selective: there’s lots of knowledge; focus on that which is important
    - content and process perspective (nouns and verbs)
    By adopting a systematic vs. an ad-hoc approach, management consultancies believe they can offer better global solutions, and reduced competitive price pressures (e.g. see Booz Hamilton Allen)
  • This is deemed as a particularly difficult and often particularly important conversion mechanism. Since tacit knowledge can be virtually impossible to codify, the extent of this knowledge conversion mechanism is debatable.
  • Transcript of "Knowledge management"

    1. 1. Knowledge ManagementKnowledge Management BY SoumyaSoumya Msc ME.dMsc ME.d SNDP Training College AdimalySNDP Training College Adimaly
    2. 2. Knowledge Management Knowledge management is the process of discovery, acquisition, creation, dissemination and utilization of knowledge for the organization. Definition
    3. 3. Knowledge Management Knowledge has been recognized as an important productivity factor for the organization
    4. 4. Knowledge Management is a discipline that seeks to improve the performance of individuals and organisations by maintaining and leveraging the present and future value of knowledge assets. Knowledge Management
    5. 5. Knowledge Management  Knowledge Management is a discipline  Knowledge is shareable in the organisation  Cultural change is not automatic  Create a change management plan  Stay strategic  Pick a topic, go in-depth, keep it current  Don’t get hung up on the limitations  Set expectations or risk extinction  Integrate KM into existing systems  Educate your self-service users Principles of Knowledge Management
    6. 6. The more your share, the more you gain. The knowledge acquisition process should be part of the work process. Integration of knowledge from multiple disciplines has the highest probability of creating new knowledge and value-added. Knowledge valuation should be conducted from customers’ perspective. KM focus should be on core knowledge critical to sustaining company’s competitive edge.
    7. 7. Knowledge Management Significance of Knowledge Management Track, measure, share and make use of intangible assets in an Organisation Paying attention to ensure that they are capturing, sharing and using productive knowledge within their organisations to enhance learning and improve performance.
    8. 8. Knowledge Management Critical success factors can be categorized as follows  Leadership  Culture  Structure, roles, and responsibilities  Information technology infrastructure  Measurement.
    9. 9. Wisdom Knowledge Information Data
    10. 10.  Data – raw facts; numbers  Information – data in context; readily captured in documents and databases  Knowledge – information plus experience to act upon  Wisdom - experience & knowledge make sensible decision. Knowledge Management
    11. 11. Knowledge Management Organisation knowledge is frequently categorised into •Tacit knowledge – personal; wisdom and experience; context-specific; more difficult to extract and codify Can be transmitted through social interactions and socialization •Explicit knowledge – what is recorded; easily identified , articulated and shared •Cultural knowledge – Cultural Ethos specific to a line of business or région or language or religion or nation.
    12. 12. Tacit Knowledge Explicit Knowledge (Subjective) (Objective) Knowledge of experience Knowledge of rationality (body) (mind) Simultaneous knowledge Sequential knowledge (here and now) (there and then) Analog knowledge Digital knowledge (practice) (theory)
    13. 13. Knowledge Management Key Problems knowledge enterprises face today are :  Poor utilization of knowledge  Information and knowledge islands  Knowledge loss  High cost of sharing knowledge  Reinvention / Repetitions  Lack of responsiveness
    14. 14. Knowledge Management Characteristics of KM Implementation Trends Approaches Adopted : •Society Centric Approach – Treats knowledge management as a social communication process •Process Centric Approach – Focuses on knowledge mapping in business process •Technology Centric Approach - Focuses on knowledge artifacts their creation storage and reuse in IT systems.
    15. 15. Knowledge Management Typical activities for knowledge management: Appointment of Knowledge leader Creation of knowledge teams  Development of knowledge bases  Knowledge centres
    16. 16. Knowledge sharing Intellectual asset management Provide motivation for employees Identify & improve practises Reduce substitutes
    17. 17. •  Knowledge is created through practice, collaboration, interaction, and education, as the different knowledge types are shared and converted. • Knowledge creation is also supported by relevant information and data which can improve decisions and serve as building blocks in the creation of new knowledge. • It is important to support unstructured work environments in areas where creativity and innovation are important.
    18. 18. Knowledge production The three basic means of human knowledge productions a)Data acquisition b)Data information c)Data understanding
    19. 19.  Willingness to collaborate with knowledge culture.  Respect & support for integrity of knowledge.  Seeking,capture & utilization of knowledge  Transparency,honest,trust.  Enthusiasm for the role of IT technology.
    20. 20.  Wiig km model  completeness,connectedness,congruency  Boisot-I space km model  codified-uncodified  Abstract-concrete  diffused-undiffused
    21. 21.  Ikujiro Nonaka and Takeuchi introduced the SECI model (Nonaka & Takeuchi 1996) which has become the cornerstone of knowledge creation and transfer theory.  They proposed four ways that knowledge types can be combined and converted, showing how knowledge is shared and created in the organization.  The model is based on the two types of knowledge: tacit , explicit
    22. 22.  There are four basic patterns for creating knowledge in any organization: 1.Socialization: From tacit to tacit 2. Externalization: From tacit to explicit 3. Combination: from explicit to explicit 4. Internalization: from explicit to tacit
    23. 23. Socialization Externalization Internalization Combination Tacit knowledge Explicit knowledge Tacit knowledge Explicit knowledge To From 3
    24. 24.  Socialization:Tacit to tacit Knowledge is passed on through practice, guidance, imitation, and observation.  Externalization:Tacit to explicit Tacit knowledge is codified into documents, manuals, etc. so that it can spread more easily through the organization. The use of metaphor is cited as an important externalization mechanism.
    25. 25. Combination: Explicit to explicit This is the simplest form. Codified knowledge sources (e.g. documents) are combined to create new knowledge. –it does not extend the company’s knowledge base Internalization: Explicit to tacit As explicit sources are used and learned, the knowledge is internalized, modifying the user's existing tacit knowledge.
    26. 26.  Nonoaka, Ikujiro, (1991)“The Knowledge Creating Company”. Harvard Business Review  Nonaka, I. & Takeuchi, H. (1995).The knowledge-creating company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation. New York: Oxford University Press  http://mcleanglobal.com/public/MGC/publications/Nonaka%20  Cook, S.D., & Brown, J.S. (1999), Bridging Epistemologies: the Generative Dance between Organizational Knowledge and Organizational Knowing. Organization Science, vol. 10, no. 4  Polanyi, M. (1966). The Tacit Dimension. London, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1966
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