Chapter 15 Network Layer Protocols: ARP, IPv4, ICMPv4,  IPv6, and ICMPv6
Figure 20.1   Protocols at network layer
20.1  ARP Mapping Packet Format Encapsulation Operation
Figure 20.2   ARP operation
Figure 20.3   ARP packet
Figure 20.4   Encapsulation of ARP packet
Figure 20.5   Four cases using ARP
An ARP request is broadcast; an ARP reply is unicast. Note :
Example 1 A host with IP address 130.23.3.20 and physical address B23455102210 has a packet to send to another host with I...
Figure 20.6   Example 1
20.2  IP Datagram Fragmentation
Figure 20.7   IP datagram
The total length field defines the total length of the datagram including the header. Note :
Figure 20.8   Multiplexing
Figure 20.9   Example of checksum calculation
Figure 20.10   MTU
Figure 20.11   Fragmentation example
20.3  ICMP Types of Messages
Figure 20.12   ICMP encapsulation
ICMP always reports error messages to the original source. Note :
Figure 20.13   Error-reporting messages
There is no flow control or congestion control mechanism in IP. Note :
Figure 20.14   Query messages
20.4  IPv6 IPv6 Addresses Categories of Addresses IPv6 Packet Format Fragmentation ICMPv6 Transition
Figure 20.15   IPv6 address
Figure 20.16   Abbreviated address
Figure 20.17   Abbreviated address with consecutive zeros
Figure 20.18   CIDR address
Figure 20.19   Format of an IPv6 datagram
Figure 20.20   Comparison of network layers in version 4 and version 6
Figure 20.21   Three transition strategies
Figure 20.22   Three transition strategies
Figure 20.23   Tunneling
Figure 20.24   Header translation
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Ch 20

  1. 1. Chapter 15 Network Layer Protocols: ARP, IPv4, ICMPv4, IPv6, and ICMPv6
  2. 2. Figure 20.1 Protocols at network layer
  3. 3. 20.1 ARP Mapping Packet Format Encapsulation Operation
  4. 4. Figure 20.2 ARP operation
  5. 5. Figure 20.3 ARP packet
  6. 6. Figure 20.4 Encapsulation of ARP packet
  7. 7. Figure 20.5 Four cases using ARP
  8. 8. An ARP request is broadcast; an ARP reply is unicast. Note :
  9. 9. Example 1 A host with IP address 130.23.3.20 and physical address B23455102210 has a packet to send to another host with IP address 130.23.43.25 and physical address A46EF45983AB. The two hosts are on the same Ethernet network. Show the ARP request and reply packets encapsulated in Ethernet frames. Solution Figure 20.6 shows the ARP request and reply packets. Note that the ARP data field in this case is 28 bytes, and that the individual addresses do not fit in the 4-byte boundary. That is why we do not show the regular 4-byte boundaries for these addresses. Note that we use hexadecimal for every field except the IP addresses.
  10. 10. Figure 20.6 Example 1
  11. 11. 20.2 IP Datagram Fragmentation
  12. 12. Figure 20.7 IP datagram
  13. 13. The total length field defines the total length of the datagram including the header. Note :
  14. 14. Figure 20.8 Multiplexing
  15. 15. Figure 20.9 Example of checksum calculation
  16. 16. Figure 20.10 MTU
  17. 17. Figure 20.11 Fragmentation example
  18. 18. 20.3 ICMP Types of Messages
  19. 19. Figure 20.12 ICMP encapsulation
  20. 20. ICMP always reports error messages to the original source. Note :
  21. 21. Figure 20.13 Error-reporting messages
  22. 22. There is no flow control or congestion control mechanism in IP. Note :
  23. 23. Figure 20.14 Query messages
  24. 24. 20.4 IPv6 IPv6 Addresses Categories of Addresses IPv6 Packet Format Fragmentation ICMPv6 Transition
  25. 25. Figure 20.15 IPv6 address
  26. 26. Figure 20.16 Abbreviated address
  27. 27. Figure 20.17 Abbreviated address with consecutive zeros
  28. 28. Figure 20.18 CIDR address
  29. 29. Figure 20.19 Format of an IPv6 datagram
  30. 30. Figure 20.20 Comparison of network layers in version 4 and version 6
  31. 31. Figure 20.21 Three transition strategies
  32. 32. Figure 20.22 Three transition strategies
  33. 33. Figure 20.23 Tunneling
  34. 34. Figure 20.24 Header translation
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