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  • 1. Clothing & Fashion Jackie Pereira P.3
  • 2. Women’s Clothing
    • Clothing for women went from three pieces (underskirt, bodice and robe) to one piece and then back to five or more pieces (skirt, underskirt, bodice, overbodice or vest, hoop and collar).
    • Women's hair coverings went from the 'pointed cone' style with no hair allowed to show
    • As time passed, a pointed hood–like covering was introduced, called a cap. In later years it became more optional to wear head or hair coverings at all.
    Jackie Pereira P.3
  • 3. Men’s Clothing
    • Legs were covered with padded breeches hosiery, shoe’s were squared toes, and a wide brimmed hat was used to complete the look.
    • Men and women both added either stand-up collars or ruffs to their necklines.
    • Sleeves were often tied or laced on, and a sleeveless underdoublet was sometimes worn as well. This was worn over a shirt.
    Jackie Pereira P.3
  • 4. Woman Hairstyles
    • Woman generally kept their hair covered
    • Woman grew their hair long but wore it up in braids, buns, or coils that could be easily covered when they went out in public.
    • Long flowing, lustrous hair, preferable blonde, was a standard feature in poets descriptions of beautiful woman.
    Jackie Pereira P.3
  • 5. Men Hairstyles
    • Bowl-shaped hair cut short so that the hair in front only cover just the top of their forehead
    • Their hair on the back of their head was shaved up off to a line parallel to the top of their ears
    • Full beard and mustaches among the Normans
    Jackie Pereira P.3
  • 6. Girls
    • They wore their dresses closely fitted to their figure, with low-crowned hats, with tight sleeves, and richly- trimmed petticoats
    • The skirts of their dresses, which were worn very wide displaying the lower part of a very rich petticoat, so long that it almost concealed their feet
    • The body of their dresses were always long and pointed in the front
    Jackie Pereira P.3
  • 7. Boys
    • Children were dressed like miniature adults and were expected to behave much the same way
    • After breaching, children were dressed in essentially adult clothes scale down to fit there small frames.
    • Their coat trunk hoses were tight, but round the waist they were puffed out
    Jackie Pereira P.3
  • 8. Fashion Fabrics
    • Sheep wool was one of the most common fibers for the middle ages. Middle ages, woolen cloth was often quite expensive.
    • Renaissance patterned fabric, usually velvets and brocades, were more popular than materials of a single color
    • Dark silks and velvets were the most popular fabrics, they were effective backdrops for precious stones and jewelry.
    Jackie Pereira P.3
  • 9. Fashion Fabrics
    • Raw silk was imported in bales called "fardels" that were covered by canvas and tied by one lengthwise cord and several crosswise cords.
    • Florence, called the City of Flowers, received its name from the floral motifs dominant in its fabrics.
    • Renaissance was dominated by Spanish fashions. The costumes worn during this period were influenced by geometric shapes.
    Jackie Pereira P.3
  • 10. 1491-1547 Taylor McLane P.3
  • 11. Early Life
    • He was born on June 28, 1491 at England’s Greenwich Palace
    • Became an accomplished musician and studied many languages
    • On April 21, 1509, Henry’s father died, leaving him the throne
    Taylor McLane P.3
  • 12. During His Reign
    • Became king in 1502
    • He left matters of states to Thomas Wolsey, while he took care of thing’s such as the military
    • Reigned for about 37 years
    Taylor McLane P.3
  • 13. Six Wives
    • His first wife was Catherine of Aarogon
    • His second wife was Anne Boleyn
    • His third wife was Jane Seymour
    • Married in June, 1509
    • Married in June, 1533
    • Married on May 30, 1536
    Taylor McLane P.3
  • 14. Six Wives
    • His fourth wife was Anne of Cleves
    • His fifth wife was Catherine Howard
    • His sixth and last wife was Catherine Parr
    • They were annulled July 9, 1540
    • Secretly married on July 28, 1540
    • Married on July 12, 1543
    Taylor McLane P.3
  • 15. Catherine of Aarogon Anne Boleyon Jane Seymour Anne of Cleves Catherine Howard Catherine Parr
  • 16. His Children
    • Had three children: Edward VI, Mary I (“Bloody Mary”), and Elizabeth I
    • Got an annulment and executed the two wives who gave him two daughters
    • Each of his children had a turn on the English throne after he died
    Taylor McLane P.3
  • 17. Edward Vi Mary I Elizabeth I His Children Taylor McLane P.3
  • 18. Military Leadership
    • His split with the Catholic Church set it for many religious battles that lasted for many centuries
    • In his early reign, he was accomplished invading France
    • Defeated Scottish forces at the Battle of Foldden Field
    Taylor McLane P.3
  • 19. Illnesses
    • In 1513, age of 22 he suffered from a bout of smallpox
    • At age 33, had his first malaria attack that would plague him for the rest of his life
    • Age 35, suffered from a serious jousting accident that would eventually cripple him
    Taylor McLane P.3
  • 20. Illnesses
    • Age 45, developed a strange growth on the side of his nose
    Taylor McLane P.3
  • 21. His Death
    • Died on January 28, 1547
    • Spent his last 8 days of his life in bed, and was even too weak to lift a glass of water
    • He died amid the horrendous stench of his bursting leg ulcers
    Taylor McLane P.3
  • 22. Works Cited
    • "Henry VIII." http://www.britannia.com/history/monarchs/mon41.html Sightlines, Inc., 2007. Web. 7 Dec. 2009.
    • Crispen, Kelly. "The Cause of Death of Henry VIII." http://tudors.crispen.org/Henry8_medical/index.html N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2009.
    •   &quot;Daily Life.&quot; Renaissance: An Encyclopedia for Students . Ed. Paul F. Grendler. Vol. 2. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2004. 1-3. Gale Virtual Reference Library . Gale. Colony High School. 7 Dec. 2009 <http://go.galegroup.com/ps/start.do?p=GVRL&u=onta38245>.
    • &quot;Henry VIII.&quot; http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/henry_viii_king.shtml BBC, n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2009.
    • Http://static.visitlondon.com/assets/events/special/henry/young_henry_500.png . Art. Art.
    • Http://www.myenglandtravel.com/images/london/Flag_of_England.png . Art. Art.
    • Http://media.photobucket.com/image/a%20cartoon%20crown/fraze7/crown.gif . Art. Art.
  • 23.
    • &quot;Henry VIII 1491–1547 King of England.&quot; Renaissance: An Encyclopedia for Students . Ed. Paul F. Grendler. Vol. 2. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2004. 149-151. Gale Virtual Reference Library . Gale. Colony High School. 7 Dec. 2009 <http://go.galegroup.com/ps/start.do?p=GVRL&u=onta38245>.
    • Http://www.fallingpixel.com/products/5796/mains/Tank.jpg . Art. Art.
    • Http://www.nwha.org/resources/HelmetCross3inch.jpg . Art. Art.
    • http://www.binbin.net/photos/generic/por/portrait-of-a-woman-from-the-fugger-family-by-paris-bordone.jpg Http://www.nwha.org/resources/HelmetCross3inch.jpg . N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2009
    • http://www.lepg.org/family.htm N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2009
    • http://histclo.com/Chron/c1500.html N.p., 2 Mar. Web. 7 Dec. 2009.
    • http://www.renaissance-spell.com/Renaissance-Fashion.html N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2009.
    • &quot;Http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/italian_renaissance/70749.&quot; (). Print.
    • Velvet, Silk and Baubles: Costume of the Italian Renaissance | Suite101.com http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/italian_renaissance/70749#ixzz0Z1suoxUw Http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/italian_renaissance/70749 . N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2009

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