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Cloud Computing: da curiosidade para casos reais
 

Cloud Computing: da curiosidade para casos reais

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Palestra do Cezar Taurion no dia 25 de junho de 2012, na PUC Rio

Palestra do Cezar Taurion no dia 25 de junho de 2012, na PUC Rio

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  • History of Innovations 1944 Mark I IBM's first large-scale calculating computer Developed in cooperation with Harvard University, the Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator, or Mark I, is the first machine to execute long computations automatically. More than 50 feet long, eight feet high, and weighing almost five tons, the Mark I uses electromechanical relays to solve addition problems in less than a second. It takes about six seconds for multiplication, and twice as long for division -- far slower than any pocket calculator today. 1948 SSEC Selective Sequence Electronic Calculator - the 1st computer that can modify a stored program. Is 250 times faster than Mark 1 but less powerful than today's desktop personal computers. It has more than 12,000 vacuum tubes and 21,000 electromechanical relays. 1956 RAMAC 305 The first magnetic hard disk for data storage revolutionizes computing. Developed in San Jose, Calif., the 305 Random Access Method of Accounting and Control (RAMAC) permits random access to any of 5 million bytes of data stored on both sides of 50 two-foot-diameter disks. The magnetic hard disk is adopted throughout the industry. In 1960, the RAMAC 305 scores the Winter Olympics in Squaw Valley, Calif. and tallies votes at both U.S. political conventions 1957 FORTRAN A group of scientists at the Watson Scientific Computing Laboratory design a computer language called FORTRAN (FORmula TRANslation). Based on algebra, plus grammar and syntax rules, it becomes the most widely used computer language for technical work. 1966 One-transistor memory cell One-transistor memory cells store each single bit of information as an electrical charge in an electronic circuit. These memory cells, or DRAM (Dynamic Random Access Memory) cells, permit major increases in memory density. This technology is adopted throughout the industry and still is in widespread use today. Pictured is the inventor, Robert H. Dennard. 1967 Fractals IBM researcher Benoit Mandelbrot publishes a paper in Science magazine introducing fractal geometry -- the concept that seemingly irregular shapes can have identical structure at all scales. Fractal geometry makes it possible to describe mathematically the kinds of irregularities existing in nature. Fractals later make a great impact on engineering, chemical engineering, metallurgy, mathematics, art and health sciences. Pictured here is a fractal representation of a mathematical object called a Mandelbrot set. 1970 Relational Databases - Individuals and businesses are able to manage and access large amounts of data faster and more easily because of the relational database. The concept, first published in a paper by an IBM researcher in 1970, enables computer users to easily query a database and quickly access the findings. 1971 Speech recognition IBM's first operational application of speech recognition enables engineers servicing equipment to talk to and receive spoken answers from a computer that can recognize about 5,000 words. Today, IBM's ViaVoice voice recognition technology has a vocabulary of 64,000 words. 1973 "Winchester" disk The IBM 3340 disk storage unit, known by its internal project name, "Winchester," becomes the industry standard for the next decade. The 3340 features a smaller, lighter read/write head and a ski-like design that enables the head to ride closer to the disk surface on an air of film 18 millionths of an inch thick. The 3340 doubles the information density of IBM disks to nearly 1.7 million bits per square inch. 1979 "Thin film" heads Instead of using hand-wound wire structures as coils for inductive elements, IBM researchers substitute patterns of light. This leads to higher-performance recording heads at reduced cost and establishes IBM's leadership in "areal density" -- storing the most data in the least space. The end result is higher-capacity and higher-performance disk drives. 1980 RISC architecture Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) architecture, developed by John Cocke, pictured here, greatly boosts computer speed by using simplified machine instructions for frequently used functions. The instruction set etched into logic circuits is reduced to basic, often-used commands that can be executed in a single machine cycle. It is the basis of most workstations in use today and is widely viewed as the computing architecture of the future. 1986 & 1987 Nobel Prizes: In 1986, Binnig and Rohrer received a nobel in physics for design of scanning tunneling microscope; in 1987, Muller & Bednorz received nobels for their discovery of superconductivity in ceramic materials. 1994 Silicon germanium chips IBM adds germanium to silicon chips, forming the basis of low-cost, high-speed transistors that are used in a new generation of wireless consumer products. Silicon germanium chips, pictured here, create significant performance improvements in high-frequency circuit operations and are adopted into products such as Global Positioning Satellite receivers and automobile collision warning systems. 1997 Deep Blue - a 32-node (256 processor) IBM RS/6000 SP high-performance supercomputer, became the first machine to beat a reigning world chess champion in a traditional match. Deep Blue now resides at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, DC, but the underlying technology continues to help with many business and industry challenges, including weather forecasting, financial market modeling , automotive design, and medical research and development. 1997 CMOS 7S (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) This technology is the first to use copper, instead of aluminum, to create circuitry on silicon wafers, permitting a dramatic increase in processing speed. CMOS 7S allows circuitry on a memory chip to be built to dimensions of 0.20 microns, 500 times thinner than a human hair. CMOS 7S can pack between 150 million and 200 million transistors on a single chip.\\1998 - Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) 1998 SOI - Silicon-on-Insulator - 8/3/98 - IBM announced it has perfected a process for building high-speed transistors that can be used to deliver higher performance microchips for servers and mainframes, as well as more power-efficient chips for battery-operated handheld devices. This technology, called "silicon-on-insulator" (SOI), represents a fundamental advance in the way chips are built. 1998 - Microdrive - IBM unveiled the world's smallest and lightest disk drive -- a potential boon to the digital camera market and to other consumer electronics devices that are increasingly demanding greater capacity for data storage. The drive can hold up to 340 megabytes of data, enough to hold about 340 200-page novels. The Microdrive can also store the equivalent of more than 200 floppy disks. 2002 - Millipede -- Using an innovative nanotechnology, IBM scientists have demonstrated a data storage density of a trillion bits per square inch -- 20 times higher than the densest magnetic storage available today. IBM achieved this remarkable density -- enough to store 25 million printed textbook pages on a surface the size of a postage stamp -- in a research project code-named " Millipede ". 2002 - Scanning tunneling microscope image of a 12 nanometer x 17 nanometer " molecule cascade " logic circuit made from carbon monoxide molecules on a copper surface. The circuit is a "three-input sorter" that calculates the logical AND of the three inputs, the logical OR of the three inputs and the logical MAJORITY of the three inputs. It is composed of three AND gates, three OR gates, six FANOUTS, three CROSSOVERS and the "wiring" to connect all of them. It is 260,000 times more compact than today's CMOS 9s circuitry. 2004 – Blue Gene/L - The latest addition to IBM's Blue Gene family of supercomputers, Blue Gene/L, is aggressively ascending the supercomputing Top500 list – a highly-respected ranking of the world's most powerful supercomputers based on the Linpack benchmark test. The Blue Gene/L prototype, at only half a rack (picture a dishwasher) and only 1/128th the size of the final version, was able to sustain a peak speed of 1.45 teraflops when it debuted at No. 73 on the 22nd Top500 list last November. Even fractionally complete, the prototype was more powerful than 85 percent of the world's 500 largest supercomputers. An independent study released today (Nov. 2004) named it as the world's most powerful supercomputer. IBM's Blue Gene/L tops the list with a sustained performance of 70.72 Teraflops, or trillions of floating point calculations per second. 2005: 5-stage Ring Oscillator: Identifying a material that can outperform silicon in terms of device density, power consumption and performance is one of the main goals of today’s nano-electronics effort. Carbon nanotubes are considered to offer the greatest potential in this context. However, current synthesis schemes all provide nanotubes with different diameters and chiralities. We built a 5-stage ring oscillator involving 14 field-effect transistors (FETs) side-by-side along the length of the nanotube. This intra-molecular circuit operates at 72MHz at V=1.04V, limited only by the non-optimized parasitic contributions.
  • We asked the respondents regarding their plans around the organization's level of cloud technology adoption today and the expected level in 3 years. 72% of the respondents were either piloting, or had adopted or substantially implemented cloud in their organization, and this number is expected to increase to more than 90% in 3 years with a rate of growth touching 215% for organizations which intend to substantially implement cloud. Further, forecasts around cloud predict the cloud market to reach up to $241bn by 2020.
  • Survey results reveal that organizations are experimenting with cloud regardless of the size. Although, larger organizations are more likely to adopt or are piloting in cloud when compared to smaller organizations.
  • Cloud computing is a new way of deploying IT over a network. Clients see only the service and not the implementation or infrastructure required for delivery. Technology services include storage, data protection, applications, business process and even business and consumer services such as email and office applications. No matter the IBM instantiation - All of our cloud-delivered services have common attributes – 5 in total: Clients will need to embrace standards to take advantage of Cloud Services IT and network capacity and capabilities are – ideally automatically – rapidly provisioned using Internet standards without transferring ownership of resources Utility pricing, variable payments, pay-by-consumption and subscription models make pricing of IT services more flexible and will evolve Resources scale up and down by large factors as the demand changes providing ability to leverage labor and not just IT IT resources from servers to storage, network and applications are pooled and virtualized to provide an implementation independent, efficient infrastructure – a dynamic one.
  • Main Point: As a result, many companies are experimenting with cloud computing, using computing resources only when and where needed, as a way to reduce the cost and complexity of delivering traditional IT services Harnessing cloud is one of the key ways companies can keep pace with ever increasing consumer expectations and competitive pressures. Consolidation, data center efficiency and lower costs are some of the drivers that led to early cloud adoption.
  • Beginning spring in 2006
  • Mobile Revolution: By the end of 2011, smart phones and tablets will overtake PC shipments.2 Downloads of mobile applications, or “apps,” are expected to surge from 11 billion in 2010 to 77 billion in 2014.3 These applications use location sensors and cameras, coupled with broadband connectivity, to enable activities ranging from videoconferencing to real-time coupon delivery for nearby stores. People want more than music, movies and books on the go; they want all information (including from businesses) that way. Mobility has eliminated the boundaries of space and time. Customers are always connected, and companies can interact with them at any time. The implications cannot be overstated. With information about products becoming as important as the products themselves, almost every company is now in the business of creating and delivering “content” – information that is personal, relevant and timely when accessed by the customer. Social Media Explosion With 2 billion people connected to the Internet, social media is quickly becoming the primary means for communication and collaboration. Young people may have spearheaded the changes, but people of all ages have joined the virtual revolution: 89 percent of the millennial generation uses social networking sites, but so do 72 percent of baby boomers. And the gap is closing. Hyper Digitization Today’s world exhibits a fast-developing case of hyper-digitization. As much information is now being generated every two days, according to former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, as existed between the dawn of civilization and 2003. Demand for video, as well as constant connectivity, is expected to double the amount of mobile data traffic every year through 2014. Power of Analytics Advanced mathematical analysis, powered by intensive computing systems, provides unprecedented opportunity to unleash the value of interconnected data. Electronic tags on packages, pallets and transport vehicles can relay critical information about the location and quality of items ranging from pharmaceuticals to food. Sensors in electrical grids and water systems, intelligent buildings and congested roadways can optimize the use of scarce resources. Predictions based on information relayed from security cameras, satellites and soil can improve public health and safety.
  • # of connected things Ericsson CEO predicts 50 billion connected devices by 2020 ( http://gigaom.com/2010/04/14/ericsson-sees-the-internet-of-things-by-2020/ ) Intel estimates that by 2015 the world will have 15 billion connected devices ( http://gigaom.com/2009/03/02/intel-inside-becomes-intel-everywhere/ ) Internet Connected Devices about to pass the 5 billion milestone - IMS Research ( http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20100816005081/en/Internet-Connected-Devices-Pass-5-Billion-Milestone )
  • The six cloud business enablers are applicable whether your cloud strategy involves becoming a consumer or a provider of cloud-based offerings – or includes elements of both Cost flexibility – 1) Shift capex to opex; - IT CapEx is money spent on acquiring physical assets for the purpose of running business.  Examples of IT CapEx: printers, servers, laptops, networking equipment, etc.  OpEx is money spent on the operational aspect of running business.  Examples of IT OpEx: telephone service, leased network lines, printer cartridges.  Enterprise software licenses are typically treated as CapEx, along with the servers and networking equipment required to host the software.  IT CapEx also tends to be less fluid and much more expensive than routine IT OpEx.  CapEx spending also tends to be harder to forecast than OpEx. OpEx typically represents a real cost of doing business: your business needs an internet connection to exist, and you pay for what you use.  CapEx in general is often more fuzzy in relation to its impact on a company’s operations, especially when it comes to IT CapEx.  Sure, you need a server to run your business, but do you really use it 100% for the entire duration of its life?  Even with virtualization tools like VMWare, you’re probably not using it 100%.  Plus, CapEx also has maintenance and “unexpected events” overhead that OpEx doesn’t. Cloud enables the shift from CapEx to OpEx. ii) Pay-per-use software and services; - With cloud applications there is no longer a need to install software or pay software license fees. This pay-per-use model provides greater flexibility and eliminates the need for significant capital expenditures 2) Business Scalability : Businesses can scale operations very easily based on requirement. If you need new servers because the number of hits to your website has increased, then you can easily do so. If you need to get rid of the extra servers, you can do that easily as well 3) Market Adaptability : Cloud enables a f aster time to market and helps in rapid prototyping, development and deployment; 4) Masked complexity : The c omplexity becomes hidden from end-user; There is user independence from IT or other operational issues like upgrade & maintenance. 5) Context-driven variability : Supports user defined preferences. Cloud can be used to store information about user preferences and enable the customization of product or service which is being delivered. 6) Ecosystem connectivity : Creation of new value nets including SMEs Shared infrastructure and services from cloud service providers Enhanced productivity through customer / partner interaction For example, cloud based platforms support sharing of resources, processes and workforce between companies in Pharmaceutical value chain, hence enabling joint research and collaboration
  • Etsy is the world’s handmade marketplace http://www.etsy.com/about/ http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/11_11/b4219052599182_page_4.htm
  • http://www.meetup.com/cloudcomputing/events/14476942/ Source: (1) http://radar.oreilly.com/2011/05/netflix-cloud.html Netflix has migrated its website and streaming service from a conventional datacenter implementation to the Amazon public cloud. Along the way, they re-wrote most of their code base, built a completely new data source backend based primarily on SimpleDB, and re-tooled their processes with high levels of automation. As a result, despite high and accelerating growth rates in Netflix subscriber counts, the growth rate of Netflix’ datacenter footprint has been halted, and all capacity expansion is now leveraging AWS.
  • The below excerpt is from the Microsoft Azure Cloud Case Study of Xerox Cloud Print: Xerox Mobile Print, a service that lets workers print to any printer in their company from handheld devices like smartphones. In 2010, Xerox began extending this service with Xerox Cloud Print, which enables workers to locate and print to any printer inside or outside their company from smartphones. Using Microsoft’s Azure Cloud, Xerox was able to use its existing IT skills and assets, and hence was able to get this innovative service to technology readiness in just four months. And, because cloud platform follows a flexible “pay as you go” model, Xerox can scale the service up or down at a moment’s notice. Cloud printing requires quite a bit of data management. There are files coming in, files being converted to print-ready format, and files being distributed to a variety of printers. With the availability of cloud platforms, there are a range of options for storing nonrelational data, so that databases do not get clogged. Database stays leaner and is therefore faster, and it’s also more economical. All this complexity remains hidden from the end-user. With Xerox Cloud Print, mobile workers can print from their mobile devices by routing print jobs through the cloud platform to the nearest available public printer. Say a worker is traveling and receives an email message on her smartphone with an attachment that she needs to print. She clicks the “open with” button on her device, and Xerox Cloud Print appears as an option. Depending on how customers configure the service, the worker might then open a dialog box that enables her to enter an address (such as for a copy shop nearby) or search for the closest public printer. She can then submit the print job from her phone. ---------- Technologically : What are they actually doing inside the cloud? - The Mobile Print solution allows employees to print from a mobile device without downloading software, mapping to a printer or booting up their laptops. This solution allows users to print from any smartphone, send documents such as emails and presentations to a server (this could be a physical enterprise server but ideally on the enterprise private cloud for which it has partnered with Cisco) then retrieve the printouts by walking up to any printer and entering a code to release the print. - The Cloud Print enables workers to print to many printers outside their organization, using Xerox’s Public Cloud rather than the organization’s own Mobile Print solution running within the organization’s private cloud. Multitude of mobile device interfaces requires enablement of print from devices that are not supported by print drivers and do not have direct access to the networks on which printers reside . Traditional print subsystems require extensions and updates. Cloud Print aims to provide an end-to-end solution to meet the printing needs of mobile workers anywhere. In essence, creates a new service and enables more users (and hence more page prints) from a given printer and also targets a new segment of mobile users. Business Opp : how are they actually using the cloud enable their business model? Put a slightly different way, what are they doing that could not be done through some other tech solution? End-to-end consulting and cloud-based services provide new, recurring revenues Incremental use of Xerox printers (particularly in the Mobile Print solution) generates additional revenues from increased use of Xerox printer consumables (e.g. toner, maintenance items) Please note the following references: Critical: http://cloudprint.cloudapp.net/developer/Summary  calls the concept we’re interested in “ Cloud Print ” http://www.consulting.xerox.com/xerox-managed-print-services/enus.html  explains the relationship between the different Xerox offerings. Not very clearly, but it appears to be their best attempt. http://www.microsoft.com/india/casestudies/windows-azure/xerox/xerox-cloud-print-solution-connects-mobile-workers-to-printers-around-the-world/4000008986  best job explaining the Xerox offerings and road leading to Cloud Print solution Important: http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/09/us-cisco-xerox-idUSTRE74807720110509  useful to understand that a) there is competition to the Cisco+Xerox partnership (Jupiter+HP) and b) Xerox can make money as a reseller as well as incremental revenue from printing supplies. Vaguely relevant: http://www.office.xerox.com/software-solutions/xerox-mobile-print-solution/enus.html  calls a similar concept Mobile Print except that it appears to require Cisco and is designed for inside businesses that use specific Xerox printers. This does not appear to be cloud-enabled, but rather an application or tool suite that enables mobile users to print within their business. Cloud Print takes this concept and moves the hosting of this tool suite outside the perimeter of the business, it seems. Brochure here: http://www.office.xerox.com/latest/SO1BR-11U.pdf http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Mobile-and-Wireless/Cisco-Xerox-Partner-on-Mobile-Printing-Via-the-Cloud-825677/ http://news.xerox.com/pr/xerox/IDC-report-positions-xerox-leader-in-managed-print-services.aspx  Sept 2010 report, but of 2009 data, is becoming a bit dated…
  • Value chain – Traditional value chains are being transformed and disrupted using the cloud, resulting in shifts in how and by who value is created, delivered and captured Value Proposition – Organizations are leveraging the cloud to re-define customer value propositions and generate additional revenue streams
  • Enhance –Use cloud to improve products and services and gain incremental revenue Improve existing products/ services, add new features Enhance customer experience Deliver through broader array of channel Extend – use cloud to create new products and services or utilize new channels or payment models Create new products or services Deliver via new channels Develop new payment models Invent - use cloud to “create a need” and own a new market Introduce new revenue models, generate new revenue streams
  • http://developer.apple.com/technologies/ios/ http://gigaom.com/apple/infographic-apple-app-stores-march-to-500000-apps/ Construct radically different value proposition to create a new “need” and own the market and form new customer segments Created a need and market for a range of office productivity tools, gaming and entertainment options and various other applications on a mobile phone. Apple introduced a standardized platform for developers to quickly, economically and efficiently develop mobile apps. Radically changed industry economics as independent developers can participate in the Apple ecosystem, to develop and sell their apps for a popular set of devices. Generate entirely new revenue streams – Established barriers to entry by being a first mover and locking in developers New revenue model created for apps developed using the platform
  • Improve Use cloud to maintain competitive parity and place in existing value chain Achieve step changes in process efficiency & effectiveness Better partnering, sourcing, collaboration Transform Use cloud to establish competitive advantage across existing value chain Create – use cloud to create sustainable competitive dominance across a new value chain
  • https://www.salesforce.com/assets/pdf/misc/WP_THINKstrategies_VAR.pdf/ http://www2.sta.uwi.edu/~anikov/info1400/lectures/05-ITF-tutorial-case-study.pdf Create new industry ecosystem or disintermediate an existing value chain Salesforce is leveraging the cloud to provide the CRM software as a service thereby enabling cost flexibility and scalability catering to changing demand and requirement patterns of the customer. Created a new software industry value chain. Disrupted the mode of delivery, usage and licensing payments for enterprise software. Introduced pay-for-use model for enterprise software services More than 227,000 subscribers at more than 13,900 companies worldwide Radically change industry economics It re-defined the customer value proposition by offering CRM software as a service to its customers and generated new revenue streams from new customer segments who could not invest in software & hardware. 21% revenues growth over 2009 ($1.3 billion in 2010) - Ranked 4th in Fortune’s 2010 ‘100 Fastest Growing Companies’.
  • CeBM Inclusion & Placement Rules : Cloud-enabled does not merely mean cloud-supported. To be CeBM, the BM would have been infeasible, either technologically or financially, without cloud. Review the need of cloud in enabling each new business model Include: Cloud is a technical necessity (ie. integral, critical part of the original design) of the BM (e.g. Force.com). These tend to innovate/disrupt. Include: Cloud is a financial necessity (ie. integral, critical part of the original design) of the BM (e.g. Netflix). These tend towards optimize/innovate. Include: Cloud is a financial or technical aid (ie. optional part of the original design or incorporated after launch ) of the BM that propped up the BM (averted failure) or unencumbered a significantly constrained BM (e.g. Ford SYNC). These tend towards optimize/innovate. Include: Cloud is a financial or technical aid (ie. optional part of the original design or incorporated after launch ) of the BM that propped up the BM and/or averted failure (e.g. Ford SYNC). These are only optimize. But beware, as if you use innovative or disruptive business models that +happened+ to use cloud, but didn’t need it, these disruptors will fall within the “Optimizer” category, causing confusion. Review the effect the business model generated via cloud. Here is where we make a leap in logic. We placed the BM on the matrix based upon its marketplace success, which confounds the effects of cloud with many other variables (e.g. leadership, timing, marketing, level of investment, timing…). As a result, unless cloud was the core of the business model (e.g. FORCE.COM), we cannot say much about cloud’s role in causing the success beyond that cloud did not inhibit the success.
  • Optimizers – leverage cloud to enhance the customer value proposition and improve in the value chain hence deepening customer relationships. They are mainly focused towards giving greater value to the customers, and hence focus more on product/service innovation and operational innovation hence increasing the overall efficiency and reducing costs. However, they realize limited or no revenue gains. Innovators use cloud to create new products and services or utilize new channels or payment models. They have the opportunity to gain a competitive advantage by extending their value proposition to adjacent industries or markets, or transforming their role in the value chain by developing new operating capabilities They create innovative technologies, but face the fear of replication by competitors as one of the major risks. For e.g. both 3M (VAS - Visual Application Service) and Animoto have developed new technologies leveraging cloud, upon which there businesses are based but face the risk of replication. Disruptors harness the cloud to address hitherto unforeseen customer needs through radically new value propositions. They create new industry economics and disrupt existing players. They definitely get the first movers advantage but also face the risk of trying untested business models which may not always succeed.
  • As discussed earlier, Optimizers Optimizers are organizations which utilize cloud to IMPROVE their role in the value chain and ENHANCE their value proposition further. North Carolina State University In collaboration with IBM, NC State looked to a new virtualization based "cloud computing" model – known as Virtual Computing Lab (VCL – for flexible and intelligent provisioning that offers a quantum improvement in access, efficiency and convenience over the traditional approach for managing resources that it had previously relied on. It allowed NCSU to enhance user experience while optimizing operational efficiencies. Xerox Offered “Mobile Print” hosted on cloud to enable its customers to remotely print documents without installing printer drivers and without a direct connection/ownership. The service is particularly attractive to mobile customers and to those who do not own printers. Hence, enhancing their value proposition to the customers. This service also helped improve printer accessibility and simplified the process of connecting and printing (without the need to configure drivers and software) Innovators Organizations, which in addition to the above, also actively utilize cloud to EXTEND or TRANSFORM and create or invent to an extent have been categorized as INNOVATORS 3M Visual Attention Service (VAS) offers cloud based scientific analysis of product and marketing design effectiveness, predicting visual Impact 3M offers VAS in a cloud-based, pay-as-you-go model that is fast, affordable, flexible, user-friendly, and fits easily into a designer’s existing process. The new cloud-based offering allows 3M to transform its role in the product development value chain by closely integrating with a global network of designers. The offering enables 3M to extend into adjacent customer segments, including brand owners, marketing professionals, and creative designers beyond 3M’s target market segments Animoto Extended its value proposition to attract customers to different products and services by using Cinematic Artificial Intelligence technology in order to create videos from photos and music using cloud based platforms. They extended the video mixing services not just to professionals, but also towards the more "amateur" audience. Disruptors CREATE new industry ecosystem or disintermediate an existing value chain or INVENT by constructing radically different value proposition to create a new “need” and own the market Apple iOS Created a need and market for a range of office productivity tools, gaming and entertainment options and various other applications on a mobile phone. Apple introduced a standardized platform for developers to quickly, economically and efficiently develop mobile apps. Radically changed industry economics as independent developers can participate in the Apple ecosystem, to develop and sell their apps for a popular set of devices. Force.com Force.com is a platform-as-a-service that delivers a scalable, easily-provisioned, pay-per-use set of development tools and IT services that enable users to customize their Salesforce customer relationship management applications or to build entirely new applications and run them “in the cloud” on Salesforce’s data center infrastructure. While disrupting the traditional enterprise software value chain, Force.com has created an entirely new customer segment of users for who customized business applications and services were prohibitively expensive earlier.
  • As discussed earlier, Optimizers Optimizers are organizations which utilize cloud to IMPROVE their role in the value chain and ENHANCE their value proposition further. North Carolina State University In collaboration with IBM, NC State looked to a new virtualization based "cloud computing" model – known as Virtual Computing Lab (VCL – for flexible and intelligent provisioning that offers a quantum improvement in access, efficiency and convenience over the traditional approach for managing resources that it had previously relied on. It allowed NCSU to enhance user experience while optimizing operational efficiencies. Xerox Offered “Mobile Print” hosted on cloud to enable its customers to remotely print documents without installing printer drivers and without a direct connection/ownership. The service is particularly attractive to mobile customers and to those who do not own printers. Hence, enhancing their value proposition to the customers. This service also helped improve printer accessibility and simplified the process of connecting and printing (without the need to configure drivers and software) Innovators Organizations, which in addition to the above, also actively utilize cloud to EXTEND or TRANSFORM and create or invent to an extent have been categorized as INNOVATORS 3M Visual Attention Service (VAS) offers cloud based scientific analysis of product and marketing design effectiveness, predicting visual Impact 3M offers VAS in a cloud-based, pay-as-you-go model that is fast, affordable, flexible, user-friendly, and fits easily into a designer’s existing process. The new cloud-based offering allows 3M to transform its role in the product development value chain by closely integrating with a global network of designers. The offering enables 3M to extend into adjacent customer segments, including brand owners, marketing professionals, and creative designers beyond 3M’s target market segments Animoto Extended its value proposition to attract customers to different products and services by using Cinematic Artificial Intelligence technology in order to create videos from photos and music using cloud based platforms. They extended the video mixing services not just to professionals, but also towards the more "amateur" audience. Disruptors CREATE new industry ecosystem or disintermediate an existing value chain or INVENT by constructing radically different value proposition to create a new “need” and own the market Apple iOS Created a need and market for a range of office productivity tools, gaming and entertainment options and various other applications on a mobile phone. Apple introduced a standardized platform for developers to quickly, economically and efficiently develop mobile apps. Radically changed industry economics as independent developers can participate in the Apple ecosystem, to develop and sell their apps for a popular set of devices. Force.com Force.com is a platform-as-a-service that delivers a scalable, easily-provisioned, pay-per-use set of development tools and IT services that enable users to customize their Salesforce customer relationship management applications or to build entirely new applications and run them “in the cloud” on Salesforce’s data center infrastructure. While disrupting the traditional enterprise software value chain, Force.com has created an entirely new customer segment of users for who customized business applications and services were prohibitively expensive earlier.
  • As discussed earlier, Optimizers Optimizers are organizations which utilize cloud to IMPROVE their role in the value chain and ENHANCE their value proposition further. North Carolina State University In collaboration with IBM, NC State looked to a new virtualization based "cloud computing" model – known as Virtual Computing Lab (VCL – for flexible and intelligent provisioning that offers a quantum improvement in access, efficiency and convenience over the traditional approach for managing resources that it had previously relied on. It allowed NCSU to enhance user experience while optimizing operational efficiencies. Xerox Offered “Mobile Print” hosted on cloud to enable its customers to remotely print documents without installing printer drivers and without a direct connection/ownership. The service is particularly attractive to mobile customers and to those who do not own printers. Hence, enhancing their value proposition to the customers. This service also helped improve printer accessibility and simplified the process of connecting and printing (without the need to configure drivers and software) Innovators Organizations, which in addition to the above, also actively utilize cloud to EXTEND or TRANSFORM and create or invent to an extent have been categorized as INNOVATORS 3M Visual Attention Service (VAS) offers cloud based scientific analysis of product and marketing design effectiveness, predicting visual Impact 3M offers VAS in a cloud-based, pay-as-you-go model that is fast, affordable, flexible, user-friendly, and fits easily into a designer’s existing process. The new cloud-based offering allows 3M to transform its role in the product development value chain by closely integrating with a global network of designers. The offering enables 3M to extend into adjacent customer segments, including brand owners, marketing professionals, and creative designers beyond 3M’s target market segments Animoto Extended its value proposition to attract customers to different products and services by using Cinematic Artificial Intelligence technology in order to create videos from photos and music using cloud based platforms. They extended the video mixing services not just to professionals, but also towards the more "amateur" audience. Disruptors CREATE new industry ecosystem or disintermediate an existing value chain or INVENT by constructing radically different value proposition to create a new “need” and own the market Apple iOS Created a need and market for a range of office productivity tools, gaming and entertainment options and various other applications on a mobile phone. Apple introduced a standardized platform for developers to quickly, economically and efficiently develop mobile apps. Radically changed industry economics as independent developers can participate in the Apple ecosystem, to develop and sell their apps for a popular set of devices. Force.com Force.com is a platform-as-a-service that delivers a scalable, easily-provisioned, pay-per-use set of development tools and IT services that enable users to customize their Salesforce customer relationship management applications or to build entirely new applications and run them “in the cloud” on Salesforce’s data center infrastructure. While disrupting the traditional enterprise software value chain, Force.com has created an entirely new customer segment of users for who customized business applications and services were prohibitively expensive earlier.
  • This slide summarizes what has been discussed till now. We first discussed about the 6 business enablers which are offered by cloud. We then discussed their impact on the value chains and the value propositions. The extent to which cloud is being leveraged to improve, transform or create the value chain, and Enhance, extend or invent the value proposition empowers organizations to optimize, innovate or disrupt the business models while encompassing , product innovation, operational innovation for optimizers, enterprise model and revenue model innovation for innovators, and in addition to all, industry model innovation for disrupters.
  • This slide summarizes the potential benefits of cloud : Scalability – access to unlimited computing resources Context driven variability – Greater reach to customers and specific targeting based upon their preferences. Greater access for customers to products and services. Cost flexibility and market adaptability – inexpensive and rapidly develop new products and service offerings seamlessly connect with customers Transforming value chains by collaborating with partners and customers Be able to redefine your role in the industry and change competitive positioning
  • The cloud computing ‘buzz’ has been going on now for 3-4 years. Cloud is a disruptive new way to deliver software & services and will lead to a whole new set of industry-specific business processes, applications, and solutions. Benefits include reduced costs, improved service delivery and an enablement of business innovation.   It can enable both new opportunities as well as new competitors in all areas of business. Something else to watch out for this year is how cloud computing will impact the mobile infrastructure and ecosystems in 2012. Major players in this market are IBM, Oracle, SAP, Microsoft, Google Enterprises, and Amazon. Speaking of Amazon, IDC is predicting it will reach $billion in Cloud Services revenue this year….and Google Enterprises is close behind.

Cloud Computing: da curiosidade para casos reais Cloud Computing: da curiosidade para casos reais Presentation Transcript

  • Cezar Taurion Technical EvangelistCloudnomics:The Power of CloudDriving Business Model Innovation IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
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  • História da Computação e da IBM se fundem…3 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Inovação na IBM: inserido no DNA corporativo The US Patent and Trademark Office awarded IBM an average 22.6 patents per working day in 2010, for a total 5,896. 6,180 U.S. patents in 2011 IBM e Governo Federal anunciam centro de pesquisas no Brasil The top-10 receivers of patents in 2010, according to IFI Claims Patent Services: de 2010 – 19h22 08 de junho  Primeiro da América do Sul. 1. IBM (5896); United States  Tecnologias para tornar o Planeta Mais Inteligente. 2. Samsung (4551); South Korea  Sistemas humanos inteligentes para grandes eventos, 3. Microsoft (3094); United States como Copa 2014 e Olimpíadas 2016. 4. Canon (2552); Japan  Sistemas inteligentes para automação de serviços. 5. Panasonic (2482); Japan  Sistemas inteligentes para descobertas de recursos 6. Toshiba (2246); Japan naturais (petróleo e gás) e logística. 7. Sony (2150); Japan 8. Intel (1653); United States 9. LG Electronics (1490); South Korea 10. HP (1480); United States4 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Talking about trends....5 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • What are general trends in the IT industry? IBM Horizon Gartner Forrester IDC Ovum Watch 2012  Cloud Computing  Smart Computing  Cloud Computing  IT Security  Cloud Computing  Mobile  Empowerment in the Datacenter  Data  Virtualization Applications &  Cloud Computing  Public Cloud Management  Social Business Media Tablets  IT as Business Services  Business  Mobile  Next-Generation Technology  Platform-as-a- Analytics Computing Analytics  Mobile Enterprise Service  Mobility  Big Data  Social Analytics Apps  Enterprise  Datacenter  Analytics  Social  Disruption-as-a- Mobility Transformation  IBM Watson Communications Service  Free SW, Open  Cloud Computing  Human / & Collaboration  HW-SW- Source  Collaboration Computer  Video Appliances  BPM Platforms  IT and Interaction  Context-Aware  Next-Gen Analytics  BI and Analytics Sustainability  Security Computing  IT and  Enterprise Data  Drive IT as  Sustainability &  Ubiquitous Sustainability  Social Media Business Green IT Computing  Social Media  Smart Devices  Context-Aware  Consumerization  Storage Class Computing of IT Memory  Fabric-Based Infrastructure and Computers Source: Gartner, cio.de, IBM MD Germany, IBM MI, HorizonWatch6 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
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  • Cloud is a new Consumption & Delivery Model that relies on the industrialization of delivery for IT supported Services “Cloud” is: “Cloud” enables:  a new consumption and  Self-service delivery model inspired by  Sourcing options consumer Internet  Economies-of-scale services. “Cloud” represents: “Cloud” can be:  The Industrialization of  Private, Public and Hybrid delivery for IT supported  Workload and/or Services Programming Model Specific8 Cloud Computing - Strategic View IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud computing is more than the sum of the parts… Cloud Computing Virtualization + Standardization + Automation + Self ServiceWith With With With Enables flexibility  Simplification  Low human involvement  User in control Increase utilization  Few configurations  Rapid deployment & mgt  Cost and usage choices Energy efficient  Enables automation  Repeatable configuration  Increased visibility Soft configuration  Easier support  Improves compliance  IT/Business alignment Infrastructure abstractionWithout Without Without Without Physically constrained  Physically constrained  Manually intensive  Dependency of availability of data centre staff Capital intensive  Many configurations  Skill dependent  Lack of awareness Hard configuration  Error prone Linked to PO process  Costly9 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud computing is more than the sum of the parts… Cloud Computing Virtualization + Standardization + Automation + Self ServiceWith With With With Enables flexibility  Simplification  Low human involvement  User in control Increase utilization  Few configurations  Rapid deployment & mgt  Cost and usage choices Energy efficient  Enables automation  Repeatable configuration  Increased visibility Soft configuration  Easier support  Improves compliance  IT/Business alignment Infrastructure abstractionWithout Without Without Without Physically constrained  Physically constrained  Manually intensive  Dependency of availability of data centre staff Capital intensive  Many configurations  Skill dependent  Lack of awareness Hard configuration  Error prone Linked to PO process  Costly10 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud computing is more than the sum of the parts… Cloud Computing Virtualization + Standardization + Automation + Self ServiceWith With With With Enables flexibility  Simplification  Low human involvement  User in control Increase utilization  Few configurations  Rapid deployment & mgt  Cost and usage choices Energy efficient  Enables automation  Repeatable configuration  Increased visibility Soft configuration  Easier support  Improves compliance  IT/Business alignment Infrastructure abstractionWithout Without Without Without Physically constrained  Physically constrained  Manually intensive  Dependency of availability of data centre staff Capital intensive  Many configurations  Skill dependent  Lack of awareness Hard configuration  Error prone Linked to PO process  Costly11 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud computing is more than the sum of the parts… Cloud Computing Virtualization + Standardization + Automation + Self ServiceWith With With With Enables flexibility  Simplification  Low human involvement  User in control Increase utilization  Few configurations  Rapid deployment & mgt  Cost and usage choices Energy efficient  Enables automation  Repeatable configuration  Increased visibility Soft configuration  Easier support  Improves compliance  IT/Business alignment Infrastructure abstractionWithout Without Without Without Physically constrained  Physically constrained  Manually intensive  Dependency of availability of data centre staff Capital intensive  Many configurations  Skill dependent  Lack of awareness Hard configuration  Error prone Linked to PO process  Costly12 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Standardization, Automation and Self Service havechanged many other industries become more efficient. Telcos automate traffic through switches to assure service and lower cost. Manufacturers use robotics to improve quality and lower cost. Banks use automated teller machines to improve service and lower cost.13 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud Service Models Financials CRM/ERP/HR Industry Specific Collaboration Applications Software/ Application-as-a-Service Web 2.0 Applications Development Middleware Runtime Tools Database Desktop Platform-as-a-Service Data Center Servers Networking Storage Fabric Consolidated, standardised, virtualised, shared, dynamically provisioned, automated Infrastructure-as-a-Service14 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • A range of deployment options Private Hybrid Public IT capabilities are provided Internal and external IT activities / “as a service,” over an service delivery functions are intranet, within the enterprise methods are provided “as a and behind the firewall integrated service,” over the Internet Enterprise Users Enterprise Enterprise Enterprise data center data center A B A B Private cloud Managed Hosted private Member cloud Public cloud private cloud cloud services services Private  Third-party operated  Third-party owned and  Mix of shared and dedicated  Shared resources On client premises  Client owned operated resources  Elastic scaling Client runs/ manages  Mission critical  Standardization  Shared facility and staff  Pay as you go  Packaged applications  Centralization  Virtual private network (VPN)  Public Internet  Security access  High compliancy  Internal network  Subscription or membership  Internal network based 15 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud Computing Reference Architecture (The Open Group) Cloud Service Cloud Service Provider Cloud Service Consumer Creator Cloud Services Common Cloud Service Business Service Management Platform Manager Manager Component Developer Consumer End OSS – Operational Support BSS – Business Support user Existing & 3rd party Services Services BM I m I P A BPaaS Pg services, Service nt Customer Service Service Composer a e Partner s c r f t Service Delivery Catalog Cloud Service Account Offering Offering Integration Ecosystems Management Catalog Management Tools I A & a P t n m p o l D c i v r e S Service Automation Management I A & l a t P m u s n o C c i v r e S Contracts & Service Offering Order Agreement Request Manager Service Management Management Management I P A Integrator SaaS Service Change & Image Request Configuration Lifecycle a e n s c r f t I m M w S Management Management Management Service Creation g e a o r t f Subscription Entitlement Consumer Pricing Business Incident & IT Service Management Management Tools Manager Provisioning Problem Level Management Management Service Management I P A Consumer In- PaaS Monitoring & IT Asset & Capacity & Metering Rating Billing Development Event License Performance Tools a e n s c r house IT f t I M m P Management Management Management g o a r f t l Business Processes Service Runtime Clearing & Accounts Accounts t m g n a M c i v r e S Platform & Virtualization Management Settlement Payable Receivable Development Applications Tools I P A IaaS Software Middleware Service Provider Portal & API Development e u a n c s m M Tools r t f I a e n g s c r f I t Infrastructure Deployment Transition Operations Security & Customer Architect Manager Manager Risk Manager Care Image Creation Tools Consumer Administrator Inf rastructure Security, Resiliency, Performance & Consumability IM AR16 Governance © 2012 IBM Corporation 2011
  • Cloud is widely recognized as an increasingly important technology;adoption is expected to accelerate rapidly in the coming years What is Your Organization’s Level of The Global Cloud Computing Market is Cloud Adoption? Forecast to Grow 22% per year through 2020 % of Respondents 91% $250B $241B Piloting 21% 72% $200B $150B Adopting $150B 38% 28% +33% $100B Substantially 21% Implemented $50B 41% +215% $41B 13% $0B Today 3 yrs 2011 2015 2020 Source: Sizing the cloud, Forrester Research, Inc., April 21, 2011 Nearly half (48%) of CIOs surveyed evaluate cloud options first, over traditional IT approaches, before making any new IT investmentsSource: (1) 2011 joint IBV/EIU Cloud-enabled Business Model Survey of 572 business & IT leaders; Q4. Which of the following most accurately describes your organisation’s level ofcloud technology adoption today and which do you expect will best describe it in three years?Sizing the cloud , Forrester Research, April 21, 2011; http://www.cio.com/article/684338/Survey_CIOs_Are_Putting_the_Cloud_First17 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Today, at least two thirds of companies of all sizes are actively eitherexperimenting with or implementing cloud What is Your Organization’s Level of Cloud Adoption? % of Respondents; Today 82% 76% 67% 43% Piloting 44% 32% 21% Adopting 22% 34% 14% 10% Substantially 5% Implemented <$1B $1B - $20B >$20B Company Annual RevenuesSource: (1) 2011 joint IBV/EIU Cloud-enabled Business Model Survey of 572 business & IT leaders, Q4, n=36318 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
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  • IT and Business are attracted to cloud for different reasons. IT is drawn to cloud’s cost, efficiency and control… of CIOs plan to use cloud— up from 33% two years ago. Transformation Efficiency of business executives believe cloud enables business transformation and leaner, faster, more agile processes. …while business users are drawn to cloud’s simplified, self-service experience and new service capabilities. 2011 IBM CIO Study, London School of Economics, December 201020 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Major factors driving cloud Virtualization of Infrastructure Drives lower capital Hardware Leverage requirements Utilization of Virtualized environments only get benefits of scale if they Infrastructure are highly utilized Reduced complexity, increased Standardization of automation possible; reduced Workloads admin burden Leverage Labor Automation of Take repeatable tasks and Management automate Clients who can “serve Self Service themselves” require less support and get services21 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • IT benefits from Cloud Computing are real Value delivered From traditional To cloud Change management Months Days or hours Test provisioning Weeks 20 minutes Install database 1 day 12 minutes Install of operating system 1 day 30–60 minutes Provisioning environment ▄ 51% cost savings Design and deploy business applications Months Days/Weeks22 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Bechtel’s New Benchmarks COMPANY TECHNOLOGY BENCHMARK WHAT BECHTEL LEARNED COM P ANY B ECHT EL Data Centers located where there is Wide-Area Network $10-$15 per megabit $500 per megabit already a lot of bandwidth lowers cost and bring data to the network 1 System 1 System Built whatever, whenever, wherever Servers Administrator per Administrator per business wanted. Google 20,000 servers 100 servers standardized server infrastructure Storage costs 15 Storage costs $3.75 Storage was cheap because storage Virtualization cents per gigabyte per gigabyte per was virtualized and more highly per month month utilized 230 Applications up 1 Application for 1 Converting 50 most heavily used to 5 versions each; million users. applications into single instance Applications Upgrades and Upgraded 4 times software as a service apps run from training were per year a Google like portal constant Source: CIO Computing, November 200823 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Mobility, social media, increasing digitization and new analyticscapabilities are conspiring to drive broad business change Major Technology Trends driving Business Change Mobile revolution Social media explosion Hyper digitization The power of analyticsSource: IBV Analysis24 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Vivemos uma rápida evolução da internet25 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
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  • Mobile explosion “By 2013, mobile phones will overtake PCs as the most common Web access device worldwide” Source: Gartner Highlights Key Predictions for IT Organizations and Users in 2010 and Beyond: http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1278413 Researchers reported that time spent on apps began to outpace time spent on the desktop or mobile Web BY 2015 mobile application development projects targeting smartphones/tablets will outnumber native PC projects by a ratio of 4-128 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Trigger for transformation The 3rd phase of the internet “colliding” with the 3rd generation of computing platform Phases of the Inter n et Internet Web2 .0 Web Mobi 3. 0 ( le, So Cloud, cial) 1964 1981 1994 2003 2008 2012 2020... s, phone (Smart evi ces Generations of Mobile Dc) , et s Tablet Computing Platforms C er ver / P C lient S am e Mainfr Source: HorizonWatch: Top Technology Trends To Watch In 2012, Bill Chamberlin29 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Internet das Coisas permite integrar o mundo da infraestruturafísica com o mundo digital Number of Connected Devices 50 Billion 50 40 30 20 15 Billion 10 7 Billion 2010 2015 2020Multiple Sources: Intel, Ericsson, Gartner, etc. Source: Company data, IDC, Yankee, Gartner, in Macquarie Group, March 200930 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • IT Strategy for the next decade: an evolution of today‘s focus topics IT Service Provider “IT as a function of the business“ Data ... Management SOA Service Appliances Big Data Managementon demand Virtualization Cloud Analytics Consolidation Mobility Collaboration Automation Cost Pressure Operational Excellence Service Quality Open Source Cyber Crime Social Media Data Center Optimization Prevention IT Security Smart Devices ...31 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud harnesses the capabilities borne out of these trends toempower six potentially “game changing” business enablers Cloud’s Business Enablers Business 2 Scalability Cost  Provides limitless, cost- Market 1 Flexibilit effective computing capacity 3 y Adaptability to support growth  Shifts fixed to variable cost  Faster time to market  Pay as and when needed  Supports experimentation Ecosystem Masked 6 Connectivity 4 Complexity  New value nets  Expands product sophistication  Potential new Context-driven  Simpler for customers/users businesses 5 Variability  User defined experiences  Increases relevance Source: IBV Analysis32 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud enables businesses to reduce fixed IT costs and shift to amore variable, “pay-as-you-go” cost structure Example: Etsy – the world’s handmade marketplace 1 Cost Flexibility Characteristics  Shifts CapEx to OpEx, when and as needed  Etsy is an online marketplace to buy and sell  Shifts cost from fixed to variable handmade goods. In addition to bringing buyers  Generates faster payback and higher and sellers together, Etsy offers product ROI recommendations based on analysis of buyer preferences Finding  Etsy uses cloud based analytics capabilities for  31% of executives see cloud’s ability its targeted marketing approach by renting to provide pay-as-you go, cost hundreds of computers every night to analyze flexibility as a top benefit1 data from a billion views of its website.  Cost flexibility of the cloud allows Etsy access to tools and compute power that only large retailers like Gap or Ikea could previously afford. The cloud frees up capital by significantly reducing the need for IT investment Source: (1) 2011 joint IBV/EIU Cloud-enabled Business Model Survey of 572 business & IT leaders; Q6a3-Q6b3(1): Expected benefits of cloud – Greater cost flexibility (today and next three years), N=57233 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud enables businesses to grow efficiently, expanding the rangeof business options Example: Netflix 2 Business Scalability Characteristics  Rapid / elastic provisioning of resources  No scale limitations  Benefit from scale economics without  Netflix streams movies on-demand with large achieving large volumes on your own surges of capacity required at peak times.  Use of cloud allowed Netflix to rapidly scale Finding up its business without having to buy, support  32% of executives see business and operate infrastructure and resources to scalability as a top cloud benefit1 meet its growth requirements Cloud’s ubiquitous and nearly unlimited computing power drives scale economics and enables self- provisioning and peak/non-peak responsiveness Source: (1) 2011 joint IBV/EIU Cloud-enabled Business Model Survey of 572 business & IT leaders,; Q6a2-Q6b2(1): Expected benefits of cloud – More scalable and flexible services (today and next three years), N=572; Source: (2) http://radar.oreilly.com/2011/05/netflix-cloud.html34 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Escalability + Cost Flexibility 50.000 core cloud utility supercomputer in the AWS cloud that was projected 12.5 years of computing time with a US$ 21 million cost, to a 3 hour simulation with a cost of US$ 4.828,85 per hour to run. AWS built the 42° fastest supercomputer in the world.35 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud enables businesses to attract a broader range of consumerswith elegantly simple solutions 4 Masked Complexity Example: Xerox Mobile Print Characteristics  Expands feasible range of sophistication in products and services  The Xerox Mobile Print platform uses tools via  Minimizes requirements of user to a cloud to convert and process print requests understand how product works or from any mobile device (e.g. tablet, smartphone) how to maintain it to a Xerox printer Finding  Removes complexity for users – no need to  Cloud’s ability to mask complexity understand / install / maintain printer device is one of the lesser known drivers for either their mobile device or targeted business enablers with less than printer 20% of executives seeing it as a top benefit1 17% 22% Cloud-enabled services leave the complexity to the experts, delivering only outcomes to the end-userSource: (1) 2011 joint IBV/EIU Cloud-enabled Business Model Survey of 572 business & IT leaders; Q6a5-Q6b5(1): Expected benefits of cloud – Reduced complexity forcustomers (today and next three years), N=57236 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud business enablers are already driving innovation acrosscompany/industry value chains and customer value propositions What is my role in the value chain?  What to do and when to rely on others? Value Chain  Where to specialize and how to set up interdependent networks? Cloud Enablement Framework How will I do what I do?  What kind of delivery structures?  Which operating model?  What is the cost structure? Customer Value PropositionWhat is my customer value Which customers am I serving? How do I generate revenue? proposition?  Which customer segments?  Which pricing models? What mix of products and  What type of relationships to  How and where to capture services? maintain? value? Which customer needs are  Which channels? being satisfied?37 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Enterprises are leveraging cloud to enhance, extend and invent newcustomer value propositions Cloud Enablement Framework Customer Value Proposition Enhance Extend InventEnhance Extend Invent Improve current value  Extend value proposition to  Construct radically different value proposition to retain/attract attract customers to different proposition to create a new customers for existing products and services “need” and own the market products and services  Attract existing or adjacent  Form new customer segments Appeal to existing customer customer segments  Generate entirely new revenue segments  Generate significant new streams Garner incremental revenue revenues38 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Invent: Some organizations are using cloud to invent entirely newcustomer experiences by creating new offerings How is Cloud Substantially Changing Your Customer Example: Apple’s iOS Value Proposition? % of Respondents 61% Changing product/service mix 68% Situation  Apple’s iOS platform enables anyone to create an application – 54% around gaming, productivity or Finding additional sources of revenue entertainment – for use on an Apple 63% mobile device. The best apps are sold through the AppStore. Value Created 36% Developing flexible  A completely new ecosystem of pricing models 48% professional and amateur developers  A radically different value proposition that dominates the market Today In 3 years Invention of new customer value propositions comprise ways in which cloud is used to create new customer needs and form new markets Source: 2011 IBM/EIU Cloud Survey Results, Q9ac/bc : How do you intend to change your value proposition ? n (today) = 28; n (in 3 years) = 136. The question has a reduced sample size, since only those respondents were asked this who affirmatively answered Q9a1/b1 (Impact of cloud on value proposition ) with Substantially changing the value proposition in order to generate additional revenues39 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud is also being leveraged to improve, transform and create neworganization and industry value chains Create  Build a new industry value chain or Create disintermediate an existing one  Radically change industry economics Value Chain Transform Cloud Enablement Transform Framework  Change organizational role within the industry or enter a different industry value chain  Develop new operating capabilities Improve  Enter adjacent industries Improve  Increase efficiency and effectiveness of the organization  Increase partnering, sourcing, and collaboration40 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Create: Organizations expecting to use cloud to redesign their businessmodel or industry, will quadruple over the next 3 years What is the Primary Focus of Your Example: Salesforce.com Organization’s Cloud Adoption Strategy? % of RespondentsImprove existing capabilities in single area of 47% our value chain 10% SituationImprove existing capabilities across multiple 37%  Salesforce.com radically altered the areas of our value chain 48% traditional software industry by offering a cloud-based, managed solution that 8% automated the critical function of marketing, Change our role within industry ecosystem 16% sales and customer relationship management 3% Value Created Redesign our industry ecosystem 17%  Rules for delivery, usage, support and licensing of critical business software were Enter a new industry 3% radically rewritten 4%  Balance of power in the industry is now shifting from the traditional software licensing 2% Create a new business model/new industry 5% model to a software-as-a-service model Today In 3 years Creation of new enterprise or industry value chains or ecosystems can drive value through industry model innovationSource: 2011 IBM/EIU Cloud Survey Results, Q8: What is the primary focus of your organisation’s cloud technology adoption strategy ? n (today) = 572; n (in 3years) = 57241 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • We classify organizations according to the extent to which their useof cloud impacts value chains and value propositions Cloud Enablement Framework Disruptors create radically different value Disruptors Create propositions, generate new customer needs and segments. They disintermediate existing industries or even create new ecosystems Innovators significantly extend customer Value Chain Transform Innovators value propositions resulting in new revenue streams and transform their role within their industry or enter a different industry ecosystem Optimizers Improve Optimizers use the cloud to incrementally enhance their customer value propositions while improving their organization’s efficiency Enhance Extend Invent Customer Value Proposition Organizations should determine how and to what degree cloud can be used to enable their business model42 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Optimizers, innovators and disruptors each face strategicopportunities and significant risks Organizational Major Opportunities Major Risks Classification  Deepen customer relationships by  Realization of limited revenue expanding value or market share gains  Increase partnering by applying cloud  Increased dependency on Optimizers  Reduce costs by leveraging cost partners flexibility  Potential industry disruption  Increase overall efficiency from less risk averse player  Expand ability to move into adjacent  Rapid replication of innovation market or industry spaces by competitors  Combine previously unrelated elements  Value capture may not be Innovators of the value chain and value proposition sustainable to increase total value  Gain competitive advantage  Capture unique competitive edge  Untested business models through creation of new or disruption of may not succeed existing industry  Fast followers are often more Disruptors  Invent new customer needs or define entirely new markets successful than first movers  Take advantage of and sustain first mover advantage43 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Organizations generally fall into one of the three categories:optimizers, innovators or disruptors Positioning of an organization’s cloud- enabled initiative within the CeBM framework Create Disruptors involves understanding the impact of the business model, not merely the intent. Organization Value Chain North Carolina State University Innovators Transform Virtual Computing Lab Xerox Mobile Print 3M Optimizers Visual Attention Service Improve Animoto Custom Presentations Force.com Application Platform Enhance Extend Invent Apple Customer Value Proposition Application Platform44 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • 45 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Organizations generally fall into one of the three categories:optimizers, innovators or disruptors Positioning of an organization’s cloud- enabled initiative within the CeBM framework Create Disruptors involves understanding the impact of the business model, not merely the intent. Organization Value Chain North Carolina State University Innovators Transform Virtual Computing Lab Xerox Mobile Print 3M Optimizers Visual Attention Service Improve Animoto Custom Presentations Force.com Application Platform Enhance Extend Invent Apple Customer Value Proposition Application Platform46 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • 3M Visual Attention Service47 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Organizations generally fall into one of the three categories:optimizers, innovators or disruptors Positioning of an organization’s cloud- enabled initiative within the CeBM framework Create Disruptors involves understanding the impact of the business model, not merely the intent. Organization Value Chain North Carolina State University Innovators Transform Virtual Computing Lab Xerox Mobile Print 3M Optimizers Visual Attention Service Improve Animoto Custom Presentations Force.com Application Platform Enhance Extend Invent Apple Customer Value Proposition Application Platform48 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud’s business enablers are fuelling innovation and empoweringorganizations to optimize, innovate and disrupt business models …that are fuelling innovations …empowering organizations to Cloud offers six “game changing” across enterprise value chains and optimize, innovate or disrupt business enablers … customer value propositions… business models Disruptors Cloud’s Business Enablers Create Business 2 Scalability Cost Value Chain1 Flexibility Value Chain Market Transform 3 Adaptability Cloud Enablement Innovators Framework Ecosystem6 Masked Improve Connectivity 4 Optimizers Complexity Context-driven Customer Value Proposition 5 Variability Enhance Extend Invent Customer Value Proposition Organizations need to assess themselves using the Cloud Enablement Framework and examine the potential to innovate by leveraging the cloud’s business enablers49 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • There are three initiatives you can start today to capture value fromcloud-enabled business models 1. Establish shared responsibility for cloud strategy and governance across the Business and IT 4. Look beyond your organization’s borders to maximize value derived from your cloud adoption  Strategize whether your organization will be an Optimizer, Innovator or Disruptor through the use of cloud-enabled business models50 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Envisioning the full potential of cloud requires organizations tochallenge existing approaches in their business and industry Reflecting on your business, question yourself – “What you would do if… … you could reach hitherto … you had access to unaddressed customers or unlimited computing markets and target them based resources to scale your on their individualized business? preferences through analytical insights? …you could redefine your role in your industry and change your competitive positioning? …you could give any of your customers access to any of your products and services anytime, anywhere, on any device? … you could easily and seamlessly connect and … you could inexpensively collaborate with business and rapidly develop and partners and customers? launch new product & service offerings? Organizations that maximize the potential of cloud’s business enablers can position themselves to capture significant value and sustainable advantage51 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud Computing deployment became part of the existing IT optimization strategy and roadmap Dynamic Standardize and automate  Standardize services Virtualize  Reduce deployment cycles  Remove physical  Enable scalability resource boundaries  Flexible delivery Consolidate  Increase hardware  Reduce infrastructure utilization complexity  Reduce hardware  Reduce staffing costs requirements  Simplify deployments  Manage fewer things better  Lower operational costs Cost IM AR = Flexibility52 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Some workloads are ready for cloud delivery Sensitive Analytics Data Information Intensive Ready Infrastructure Storage for Cloud Highly Customized Isolated Industry Workloads Applications Not yet Collaboration Virtualized Mature Workloads Development 3rd Party SW & Test May not yet be ready Workplace, Desktop Complex Pre-Production & Devicesfor migration Processes & Systems Transactions Business Processes Batch Regulation Infrastructure Processing Sensitive Compute53 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • The realities of cloud versus hype Reality Today Cloud Hype Future Reality So, no “BIG BANG” ! ≠ Trad. SO Trad. SO Everything in the Internal IT plus 3rd party cloud and all at once Sourcing mixture - for some things retain legacy, plus private/hybrid, public Source: Market Insights and Gartner People tend to overestimate what will happen two years from now and underestimate what will happen in 10.54 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Cloud Computing has moved beyond the hype. It is a highlydisruptive trend that brings with it new opportunitiesDisruption“Cloud services are interconnected with and accelerated by other disruptive technologies, includingmobile devices, wireless networks, big data analytics, and social networking. As during themainframe and PC eras, the new platform promises to radically expand the users and uses ofinformation technology, leading to a wide and entirely new variety of intelligent industry solutions.” –IDCOpportunity“What supply chain models did to manufacturing is what cloud computing is doing to in-house datacenters. It is allowing people to optimize around where they have differentiated capabilities.” – GartnerMobile Cloud Services “In 2012, mobile workers and consumers will embrace tablets, mobile content, mobile video and personal cloud services at unprecedented levels. Nearly 1 in 5 professionals with three or more devices will adopt a personal cloud service for online storage, backup and synching.” – Yankee Research55 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • What is coming? In 2021, cloud computing is simply computing, corporate office parks are senior housing facilities and the IT organization of the future has been absorbed by the business.  Internal IT becomes an internal cloud.  IT becomes a services broker.  IT will become a function of the business. Gartner, 201156 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Acessem agora!Saiba mais sobre Cloud na Comunidade Cloud Computing Brasil: http://ibm.co/cloudcomputingbr *Conheçam o IBM SmartCloud Provisioning – Download gratuito! (Universidade) http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/br/downloads/tiv/smartcloud/index.html dW Brasil: www.ibm.com/developerworks/br/ @soudW IBMdeveloperWorksBrasil www.ibm.com/cloud-computing/57 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • Obrigado! ctaurion@br.ibm.com www.ibm.com/developerworks/blogs/page/ctaurion @ctaurion Facebook, Linkedin, BranchOut58 IM AR © 2012 IBM Corporation