Vending machine

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Vending machine

  1. 1. Vending machine Student name : Rand F. Al-Aqrabawi Dr. Abaza M. GH.
  2. 2. History • Vending machine became popular during the industrial revolution . • The first modern coin-operated vending machines were introduced in England in the early 1880s . • The first vending machine in the U.S. was built in 1888 by the Thomas Adams Gum Company.
  3. 3. • In 1897 games has been added to these machine . • In December 1970, Ussery Industries of Dallas, Texas at its Dallas convention displayed its "talking" vending machine, the Venda Talker.
  4. 4. What is the vending machine • Electronic machine used to disperse a product to a consumer after a certain amount of money has been put into the machine. • Vending machines are commonly used to disperse beverages and snack items, but in recent years companies have introduced vending machines that disperse other items, even including electronic items such as digital cameras or iPods.
  5. 5. Simple vending machine The vending machine delivers an item after it has received 15 cents in coins. The machine has a single coin slot that accepts nickels and dimes, one coin at a time. A mechanical sensor indicates whether a dime or a nickel has been inserted into the coin slot. The controller's output causes a single item to be released down a chute to the customer.
  6. 6. Block diagram N D open Reset CLK Vending machine FSM coin sensor Gum release mechanism
  7. 7. assume that N is asserted for one clock period when a nickel is inserted into the coin slot and that D is asserted when a dime has been deposited. Furthermore, we'll postulate that it is enough if the machine asserts Open for one clock period to release an item after 15 cents (or more) has been deposited since the last reset.
  8. 8. Abstract representations • Three nickels in sequence: N, N, N • Two nickels followed by a dime: N, N, D • A nickel followed by a dime: N, D • A dime followed by a nickel: D, N • Two dimes in sequence: D, D
  9. 9. State diagram s1 s0 s3 s7 s2 s6 s8 s4 s5 reset N D N D N D N D
  10. 10. The machine will pass through the states S0, S1, S3, S7 if the input sequence is three nickels. in state S0 if neither input N or D is asserted, we assume the machine remains in state S0 (the specification allows us to assume that N and D are never asserted at the same time). Also, we include the output Open only in states in which it is asserted. Open is implicitly unasserted in any other state.
  11. 11. State Minimization This nine-state description isn't the "best" possible. For one thing, since states S4, S5, S6,S7 and S8 have identical behavior, they can be combined into a single state. To reduce the number of states even further, we can think of each state as representing the amount of money received so far. For example, it shouldn't matter whether the state representing 10 cents was reached through two nickels or one dime.
  12. 12. 0 5 10 15 reset N N N D D
  13. 13. State table
  14. 14. Minimized symbolic state transition
  15. 15. FSM IMPLEMENTATION
  16. 16. Vending machine kinds There are so many types of vending machines available from different vending machine manufacturers and suppliers. Some machines need electricity to vend the products, while some others use mechanical motion to vend. They come in several sizes, shapes, colors, and prices. Vending machines are found mostly in shopping malls, waiting areas, bowling alleys, businesses, and schools.
  17. 17. Commonly vending machines • Soda vending machine • Gumball vending machine • Snack vending machine • Food and toy vending machine • Coffee vending machine • Cigarette vending machines • Pop corn vending machine
  18. 18. Gumball vending machine
  19. 19. Coffee vending machine
  20. 20. Cigarette vending machine
  21. 21. Toys vending machine
  22. 22. Cold drinks vending machine
  23. 23. Snack vending machine
  24. 24. Designing coffee vending machine
  25. 25. Present state Input Next state Output QA QB N D DA DB C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 X X 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 X X 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 X X 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1
  26. 26. DA 00 01 11 10 00 1 1 01 1 1 1 1 11 X X X X 10 1 1 1 C 00 01 11 10 00 1 01 1 11 1 10 1 DB 00 01 11 10 00 1 1 01 1 1 1 11 X X X X 10 1 1 1 QA QB QA AB QA QB N D N D N D
  27. 27. Flip-flop Inputs Equations and System Output Equation and it’s conversion to NAND Gates: • DA = QA + D + NQB = (QA + D + NQB)” = (QA’D’(NQB)’)’ • DB = NQB’ + NQA + DQA + N’QB = (NQB’ + NQA + DQA + N’QB)” = ((NQB’)’(NQA)’(DQA)’(N’QB)’)’ • C’ = (QAQB)’ = ((QAQB)’)” = (QA’QB’)’
  28. 28. Logic circuit diagram using NAND gates and two Flip Flops
  29. 29. References • http://EzineArticles.com/352816 ^ • "Old World, High Tech". Smithsonian Magazine. • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vending_machin e • http://www.ecgf.uakron.edu/grover/web/ee2 63/labs/ASimpleVendingMachine.pdf • : http://www.businessdictionary.com/definitio n/vending-machine.html#ixzz2XoOXrsBt

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