PLU: OTEN 2013 - Student Preferences & Expectations for Technology in the Classroom

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Presented at OTEN 2013, at Pacific University.

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  • Show of hands…
  • College students often come from technology-rich K-12 environments
  • National survey – illuminate trendsSurvey of our students & faculty - specificity
  • ANIMATED
  • ANIMATEDFocus on inflection points…
  • ANIMATED
  • ANIMATED
  • Show of hands
  • Animate highlighted top 2used and important for academic successNote flattening for saturation of use
  • ANIMATED
  • 70% from ECAR 2012
  • Tech has a democratizing effectBy providing access to info on demandThe effect can be harnessed when “access to info” is streamlined THEORETICALLY creating a scenario where students have more time to “use the info”75% say tech helps them achieve their ac outcomes, 75% say it preps them for future ed plans, 63% say it prepares them for the workforceWinning tech trifecta:Laptops – to producePrinters – review and submitThumb drives – to transport and share
  • ANIMATE
  • Explaining how factor analysis was used to identify benefits of technology in academic success:A statistical technique used to reduce a large number of attributes into a smaller set of “factors” based on response patterns.A factor consists of a number of attributes that are rated in a similar way.Factor analysis is extremely useful when dealing with a very large number of attributes that would be cumbersome to analyze individually.The names of the factors are subjective and are intended to describe the common theme shared by all of the attributes within that factor.
  • ANIMATEDStudents want to interact with instructors using direct forms of interaction (f2f, email) and the cms/LMSEven students for who have taken online courses 8 out of 10 say F2F interaction is very/extremely importantDon’t know if they consider f2f as physically f2f or f2f 1:1 interaction remotelyEmail provides a passive, but highly documentable way to connect with instructorsEmail topped this list in 2011…didn’t ask about F2F
  • Student preferences and expectations with institutional readiness and learning outcomes
  • PLU: OTEN 2013 - Student Preferences & Expectations for Technology in the Classroom

    1. 1. STUDENT PREFERENCES AND EXPECTATIONS FOR TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM Steve Sosa and Layne Nordgren Instructional Technologies Information & Technology Services
    2. 2. About Pacific Lutheran University • Liberal Arts Emphasis • Professional Schools • Education • Business • Nursing • Students - 3,500 FTE • Faculty - 250 FTE • Residential
    3. 3. In the Audience Today Position • Student • Faculty • Instructional Technologist • Instructional Designer • Librarian • Administrator • Other? Institutional Affiliation • K-12 • Small University • Large University • Other?
    4. 4. ABOUT THIS SESSION
    5. 5. About Perceptions and Expectations • Faculty expectations • Student expectations • Inherent gap
    6. 6. About Technology In the Classroom “PLU professors are committed to a teaching and learning environment that introduces students…to search for truth.” (Core Elements in Lutheran Higher Education)
    7. 7. Let’s Define “Classroom” • Classroom • Confined space • Limited access/availability • Single location • Engages students in the classroom
    8. 8. Let’s Define “Environment” • Environment • Limitless space • Constant access, availability • Multiple locations • Engages the world around us
    9. 9. About Advancement of Knowledge • Collect research • Spot trends • Analyze data • MISO • ECAR • Foster better decision making
    10. 10. About Empowering Faculty • Better at what they currently do • Helping explore new techniques • Partnering in technology integration
    11. 11. WHY SHOULD WE CARE WHAT STUDENTS WANT?
    12. 12. Why Should We Care? • Part of our contract “…I will do what I see will be needful, advantageous, and wholesome for my neighbor.” “…profound commitment to the common good.” • Better educators, innovators, and role models • It can make a difference
    13. 13. THEY’RE JUST STUDENTS (AFTER ALL)…
    14. 14. Defining Attributes • Empowered individuals with entire world at their fingertips • Connected 24x7 • They collectively write, share, collaborate, and rate the world around them • They are experts at finding solutions...
    15. 15. We Could Learn From Them • Strong sense of community • Their community is local and global • Know people sometimes better online than in real life (IRL) • Technology is a naturally integrated part of their lives • Promised, “There’s an app for that.” • They expect it
    16. 16. BY THE NUMBERS A Numeric Call to Action..?
    17. 17. Context
    18. 18. Context When they come to the university… • What devices to they bring? • What are their perceptions and expectations about technology for academic use?
    19. 19. Technology Survey Comparisons • 220 Institutions (2013) • Across Carnegie classes • 112,000+ Undergraduates • No PLU students • 98 Institutions (2005-2014) • Primarily liberal arts • PLU Undergraduates • 25% sample, ~ 700 • Participation in 2012: 60.3%
    20. 20. BYOE Bring Your Own Everything
    21. 21. ECARDatafrom:ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2012. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1208/ERS1208.pdfFigure4.p.13 12% 15% 33% 62% 86% 20% 9% 23% 58% 95% 40% 19% 64% 53% 88% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% eReader Tablet Desktop Smartphone Laptop MISO - PLU Faculty MISO - PLU Student ECAR Student Device Ownership
    22. 22. Smartphones replace phones Laptops replace desktops ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdfFigure16,p.26 Trend Toward Mobility = PLU Students
    23. 23. Device Importance & Use Trends ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdfFigure17,p.27 Use Importance
    24. 24. ECAR:TheConsumerismofTechnologyandtheBYOEEraofHigherEducation. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1301/ERS1301.pdfFigure3,p.10 ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013 http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdfFigure5,p.12 Devices Per Person By 2014 students will have nearly 4 devices
    25. 25. Devices Per Person? How many of the following devices do you use? • Laptop • Smartphone • Desktop • Tablet • eReader
    26. 26. Horizon Report 2013 • Time to adoption horizon: < 1 year • Tablet Computing • iPad 85M in 2013 to 377M in 2016 • Apps Notability http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2013-horizon-report-HE.pdfp.15
    27. 27. Horizon Report 2013 • Time to adoption horizon: 4-5 years • Wearable Technology • SixthSense • Memoto lifelogging camera • Google Glasses http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2013-horizon-report-HE.pdfp.32
    28. 28. Here’s the Class Welcome Student Devices Receive… ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013 http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdfFigure18,p.28
    29. 29. Key BYOE Trends • Laptops replacing desktops • Smartphones replacing cell phones • Students bringing more devices (favoring smaller and more portable)
    30. 30. How will these device trends affect student expectations of how they learn with technology?
    31. 31. How will institutions and faculty respond to these device trends?
    32. 32. Brainstorming Session: 10 Minutes How will we respond to student device trends? Self Select into Teams • Faculty • IT & Classroom Support • Institution/Administration Define Group Roles • Recorder • Reporter
    33. 33. Brainstorming Session: 10 Minutes How will we respond to student device trends? 1. Preferences for technology use 2. Challenges 3. Recommendations
    34. 34. Extracting Meaning from Data “Contextualizing the findings is an institution-specific undertaking in that unique institutional cultures and priorities affect the answers…” ECAR Study… 2013 p. 8 One Size Does Not Fit All… • Benchmark key data of relevance to institution • Survey and watch trends • Incorporate actions into tactical and strategic plans ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013 http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdfp.8
    35. 35. WHAT DO STUDENTS USE THEIR DEVICES FOR? Personal and Academic
    36. 36. Technology Resources - Use & Importance ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013 http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdfFigure4,p.10 2012: Greatest impact on student success Flattening = Saturation of use?
    37. 37. 4.87 4.61 4.41 3.33 3.86 3.84 3.53 3.69 1 3 5 Email services Wireless access Sakai Access online resources off- campus Use Importance PLU MISO 2012 – Service Use & Importance
    38. 38. Smartphones & Academic Use - 2011 ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2011. Infographic. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1103/EIG1103.pdf
    39. 39. Smart Phone In-Class Use (if allowed) ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013 http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdfFigures19&20,p.29-30 Uses Barriers to Use
    40. 40. Student Device Use
    41. 41. Student Device Use
    42. 42. Student Device Use
    43. 43. HOW DO STUDENTS PERCEIVE TECHNOLOGY AFFECTING THEIR ACADEMIC SUCCESS?
    44. 44. Learning Environments 70% of students say they learn most in blended learning environments “When it comes to modality, college students seem to recognize effectiveness when they see it.” ECAR… 2013 ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013 http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdfp.15
    45. 45. Technology Helps Me… (agree or strongly agree) ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013.Infographic. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/Eig1302.pdf
    46. 46. ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2012. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1208/ERS1208.pdfFigure9.p.24 Importance of Devices to Academic Success Three Key Student Devices forAcademic Productivity
    47. 47. Technology Resources Wish List • Anytime, anywhere access to course materials • Leveraging use of mobile devices 72% ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013 http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdfFigure13,p.22
    48. 48. Line between mobile convenience and productivity getting blurry…
    49. 49. CAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2011. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1103/EIG1103.pdf Access to Resources and Progress Reports  Easy to track my academic progress  Helps me know how I am doing  Gives me access to resources  Easier to get help when I need it Average Agreement with Statements 52% Makes Students More Efficient  Helps me do my work faster  Allows me to produce higher-quality work  Efficient way to store examples of work  Makes college easier44% Facilitates Connecting with Others  Feel connected to other students  Feel connected to professors/staff  Feel connected to what's going on  Gives me access to experts in my field35% Makes Learning More Engaging and Relevant  Learning more creative  Learning more fun  Extends learning beyond classroom  Prepares me for workforce44% Four Factors for Academic Success
    50. 50. WHAT EFFECT DOES TECHNOLOGY USE HAVE ON STUDENT ENGAGEMENT?
    51. 51. Active Involvement 54% of students say they are more actively involved in courses that use technology ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2012. Infographic http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1208/EIG1208.pdf
    52. 52. Students who agree or strongly agree that their instructors deliver these benefits: ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2011. Infographic. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1103/EIG1103.pdf Engaging Students with Technology 76% Extends learning beyond the classroom 72% Control of my own learning 67% Makes learning more creative 66% Better prepares me to enter workforce 46% Makes learning more fun
    53. 53. Student Wish List for Instructor’s Technology Use ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2012. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1208/ERS1208.pdfFigure3.p.11 Near bottom of importance list
    54. 54. WHAT COMMUNCATION DO STUDENTS PREFER?
    55. 55. Technology Makes Me Feel More Connected to… ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013.Infographic. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/Eig1302.pdf
    56. 56. Engaging Students with Technology 60% of students prefer to keep their academic and social lives separate “…even though students use a technology regularly as part of their everyday lives, it does not mean that they want the same technology integrated into their academic lives” 1.ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2012. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1208/ERS1208.pdfp.25 2.ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013.Infographic. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/Eig1302.pdf
    57. 57. Social Networks and Academics ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2012. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1208/ERS1208.pdfFigure10.p.26 57% 60% Not so comfortable connecting with professors Comfortable connecting with other students
    58. 58. Questions for Social Media 57% 60% Facebook Would a dedicated “page” help engagement? Twitter Could news feed be embedded elsewhere? LinkedIn How should faculty recommend students?
    59. 59. Communicate with These More... ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdfFigure25,p.37 53% 45%
    60. 60. KEY TAKEAWAYS
    61. 61. Key Takeaways Bring It On! Students continue to bring their own technology • More devices • More mobile
    62. 62. Key Takeaways Students Are Shrewd Technology Consumers Students have strong and positive perceptions about how technology benefits them 75% say technology helps them achieve their academic outcomes ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2012.Infographic. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1208/EIG1208.pdf
    63. 63. Key Takeaways Mix It Up! Blending modalities and using technology to engage learners is a winning combination 70% of students said these are the environments in which they learn most ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2012.Infographic. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1208/EIG1208.pdf
    64. 64. BYOE Opportunities/Challenges • Increasing student engagement with technology • Extending the classroom to anytime, anywhere • Making campuses desirable places to engage with technology and technology-enabled learning ECARStudyofUndergraduateStudentsandInformationTechnology,2013.Infographic. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/Eig1302.pdf
    65. 65. HOW DO WE RESPOND AS AN INSTITUTION?
    66. 66. Wifi Across Campus
    67. 67. Smart Classroom Initiatives
    68. 68. Fully Supported Help Desk
    69. 69. Examining Job Descriptions
    70. 70. Examining Technologies Available
    71. 71. Proposing Technology Adoption
    72. 72. Funding Key Technology
    73. 73. HOW SHOULD FACULTY PREPARE?
    74. 74. By Questioning the Status Quo How Do I…to How Should I? • How do I define student success? • How do I create an environment which fosters student success? • How do I reach students beyond the classroom? • How do I provide access to the syllabus, course materials, and resources? • How do I keep students engaged, even years after the class is over? • How do I capture great lectures, guest speakers, and student presentations? • How do I share my teaching, my research, and exceptional student work with the entire world?
    75. 75. By Getting the Right Help • Instructional Technologies Department • Equipment checkout • Software support • Technology workshops • Instructional design consultations
    76. 76. By Committing to Consultations • Discuss unique, desired outcomes • Overview of instructional technologies available • Provide reality check • Establish time commitments
    77. 77. By Providing Policies in Syllabi • Appropriate use of technology • Integration of social media
    78. 78. By Partnering w/Instructional Technologies • Support in course design • Support in content creation • Solutions to showcasing student work • Full use of Google Apps, Sakai, and much more
    79. 79. By Seeking Out Your Peers • Office of Professional Development • Peer Faculty Across Other Disciplines
    80. 80. INSTEAD OF CLARITY, WE HAVE MORE QUESTIONS.
    81. 81. A Balancing Act Learning Outcomes
    82. 82. Asking the Right Questions Faculty 1. Does this change the requirements for my assignments? 2. Does this change the format I accept for submission? 3. Am I providing all content in the best format? 4. Do I encourage device use in the classroom?
    83. 83. Asking the Right Questions Administration 1. What happens when an entire class connects at the same time? 2. How do multiple devices authenticate? 3. Do we need to provide power at every desk? 4. How does projection occur from portable devices? 5. Standards? 6. Policy? 7. Privacy? 8. Security? 9. How does FERPA play into mobile devices?
    84. 84. NOW, IT’S UP TO YOU. (By taking these questions back to your institution...)
    85. 85. It’s Up To You… • Remember that data is compiled from multiple institutions • Your institution is unique • Your culture is unique • Institutional priorities affect your answers • Remember that one size does not fit all
    86. 86. THANK YOU.
    87. 87. Resources • ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students & Information Technology, 2013. http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/ecar-study-undergraduate-students-and-information-technology-2013 • ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students & Information Technology, 2012. http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/ecar-study-undergraduate-students-and-information-technology-2012 • ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students & Information Technology, 2011 http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/ecar-national-study-undergraduate-students-and-information-technology- 2011-report • ECAR: The Consumerism of Technology and the Bring-Your-Own-Everything (BYOE) Era of Higher Education. http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1301/ERS1301.pdf • MISO Survey http://www.misosurvey.org/ • NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Higher Education Editionhttp://www.nmc.org/publications/2013-horizon- report-higher-ed • The Wild-Card Character of “Bring Your Own” Educause Review March/April 2013http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERM1321.pdf • Seven Principles at WPI: Technology as a Lever http://wp.wpi.edu/atc-ttl/2012/02/09/seven-principles-at-wpi-technology-as-a-lever/

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