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Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology
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Lecture 1. an introduction to epidemiology

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  • 1. An Introduction to Epidemiology Sorokhan MD, PhD Bukovinian State Medical University Department of infectious diseases and epidemiology
  • 2. What is Epidemiology? <ul><li>Epidemiology is the basic science of public health. This discipline is based on principles of statistics and research methodologies and designed to train professionals to apply the principles and methods of epidemiological investigation in a broad range of settings. </li></ul>
  • 3. Types of Epidemiological Studies <ul><li>Epidemiological studies are either observational or experimental. Within observational studies, are the subsets of case control and cohort studies; within the subset of cohort there can be retrospective or prospective cohort studies. </li></ul>
  • 4. Different types of epidemiological studies the pictorial representation of the different types of epidemiological studies
  • 5. Observational Studies <ul><li>In observational studies, the epidemiologist does not assign a treatment but rather observes. For example, if the epidemiologist wanted to see if smoking is related to lung cancer, he would not be able to ethically assign people to smoke and not smoke, but rather would observe the prevalence of who (smokers vs. non) develops cancer. </li></ul>
  • 6. Case Control Studies <ul><li>Looks for causes of disease </li></ul><ul><li>Looks at those with disease (case) vs. those without disease (control) </li></ul><ul><li>The case group and control group should share the same potential causes/factors that are not to be studied (e.g. age, socioeconomic status, sex, etc.), but should not share factors that the epidemiologist suspects are causal factors </li></ul>
  • 7. Case Control Studies <ul><li>The sample should be large enough so the findings can be extrapolated to a larger population </li></ul><ul><li>Tests to see whether a given causal factor is significant through the odds </li></ul>
  • 8. Cohort Studies <ul><li>Looks for causes of disease </li></ul><ul><li>Can have a control group or not </li></ul><ul><li>There are two types: retrospective and prospective </li></ul>
  • 9. Experimental Studies <ul><li>In experimental studies, the epidemiologist assigns subjects treatments. This is in contrast to the observational study, where the researcher observes subjects and, in a sense, 'waits' for the 'treatment' or results to happen. One type of experimental study is the Randomized Control Trial. </li></ul>
  • 10. Randomized Control Trial <ul><li>Subjects are randomly given the treatment or control </li></ul><ul><li>Example: To see whether a medicinal herb decreases the incidences of depression, subjects were randomly given either a medicinal herb or a placebo . Depending on what treatment they received (herb or placebo), they were in either group 1 or group 2. </li></ul>
  • 11. Disease Transmission <ul><li>An epidemic is the occurrence of more cases of disease than would normally be expected in a specific place or group of people over a given period of time. </li></ul>
  • 12. Disease Transmission <ul><li>An endemic is a high </li></ul><ul><li>background rate of disease. </li></ul><ul><li>A pandemic is very widespread, </li></ul><ul><li>often global, disease. </li></ul>
  • 13. Disease Transmission <ul><li>An agent (a bacterium, parasite, or virus) is the entity necessary to cause disease in a susceptible host. </li></ul><ul><li>Infectivity - the capacity to cause infection in a susceptible host. </li></ul><ul><li>Pathogenicity - the capacity to cause disease in a host. </li></ul>
  • 14. Disease Transmission <ul><li>Virulence - the severity of disease that the agent causes in the host. </li></ul><ul><li>The host is the organism, that is susceptible to the effect of the agent. The status of the host is quite important and is generally classifiable as susceptible, immune, or infected. Finally, and also quite important, is that the host's response to exposure can vary widely, from showing no effect to manifesting subclinical disease, atypical symptoms, straightforward illness, or severe illness. </li></ul>
  • 15. Disease Transmission <ul><li>The environment is the conditions or influences that are not part of either the agent or the host, but that influence their interaction. A wide variety of factors, including physical, climatologic, biologic, social, and economic conditions, can come into play. </li></ul>
  • 16. Disease Transmission <ul><li>Agent, host, and environment alone are not sufficient to cause an epidemic; an adequate chain of transmission must be present. This process requires a source for the agent, a portal of exit, a mode of transmission, and a portal of entry. </li></ul>
  • 17. Disease Transmission <ul><li>The first element, the source for the agent , is often the place where the agent originates, where it lives, grows, and multiplies, but this is not always the case. The agent that causes botulism ( Clostridium botulinum ), for example, originates in soil, but the source of most botulism infections is improperly canned food containing C. botulinum spores. </li></ul>
  • 18. Disease Transmission <ul><li>The second element, a portal of exit , is a pathway by which the agent can leave the source. This pathway is usually related to the place where the agent is localized. </li></ul>
  • 19. Disease Transmission <ul><li>For instance, the agents causing tuberculosis and the flu are released through the respiratory tract, whereas agents for many stomach ailments are released through the digestive tract. Agents found in the blood, such as hepatitis B and HIV, can be released through cuts or needles. </li></ul>
  • 20. Disease Transmission <ul><li>Once the agent leaves the source, a mode of transmission , or means of carrying it to the host, is needed. This can happen in a number of ways, some of which are direct and some indirect. </li></ul>
  • 21. Disease Transmission <ul><li>Direct transmission includes contact with soil or plants as well as contact between people. In indirect transmission , the agent can be airborne , vector borne , or vehicle borne . </li></ul>
  • 22. Disease Transmission <ul><li>In airborne transmission, the agent is carried from the source to the host suspended in air particles. Vector-borne diseases are transmitted indirectly by a live carrier, usually an arthropod, such as mosquitos, fleas, or ticks. Vehicle-borne diseases are carried by inanimate objects, such as food or water, blood, or items like handkerchiefs, bedding, and surgical instruments. </li></ul>
  • 23. Disease Transmission <ul><li>Finally, there must be a pathway into the host, a portal of entry , that gives the agent access to tissue where it can multiply or act. Often the agent enters the host in the same way that it left the source. This is the case with the flu virus, which leaves the source through the respiratory tract and enters a new host through the respiratory tract. </li></ul>
  • 24. Questions and Answers What is epidemiology? Epidemiology is the basic science of public health. What are types of epidemiological studies ? Observational and Experimental.
  • 25. Questions and Answers What is epidemic? An epidemic is the occurrence of more cases of disease than would normally be expected in a specific place or group of people over a given period of time. What is endemic? An endemic is a high background rate of disease.
  • 26. Questions and Answers What is pandemic? A pandemic is very widespread, often global, disease. What is agent? An agent (a bacterium, parasite, or virus) is the entity necessary to cause disease in a susceptible host.
  • 27. Questions and Answers What is infectivity? Infectivity - the capacity to cause infection in a susceptible host. What is pathogenicity? Pathogenicity - the capacity to cause disease in a host.
  • 28. Questions and Answers What is virulence? Virulence - the severity of disease that the agent causes in the host. What is source for the agent? The source for the agent, is often the place where the agent originates, where it lives, grows, and multiplies, but this is not always the case.
  • 29. Questions and Answers What is a portal of exit? A portal of exit is a pathway by which the agent can leave the source. This pathway is usually related to the place where the agent is localized. What is mode of transmission? A mode of transmission means of carrying agent to the host.
  • 30. Questions and Answers What is a portal of entry? A pathway into the host.
  • 31. Thank you for your attention!

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