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Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia
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Payment System Simulations @ Central Bank of Bolivia

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Presentation at Payments System Oversight Course at Central Bank of Bolivia, La Paz, 25 November 2011 …

Presentation at Payments System Oversight Course at Central Bank of Bolivia, La Paz, 25 November 2011

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  • 1. Presentation at Payments System Oversight CourseCentral Bank of Bolivia, La Paz25 November 2011Payment System SimulationsSimulation analysis and stress testingof payment networks – Session 2Kimmo Soramäkikimmo@soramaki.net, www.fna.fi
  • 2. Agenda• Payment simulations in policy and oversight• Payment simulation research• How to start simulation analyses?
  • 3. What are simulations?• Methodology to understand complex systems – systems that are large with many interacting elements and or non-linearities• In contrast to traditional statistical models, which attempts to find analytical solutions• Usually a special purpose computer program that takes inputs, applies the simulation rules and generates outputs• Stochastic or deterministic inputs• Static, evolving or co-learning behavior
  • 4. Short history of simulations inPayment System Oversight/Policy• 1997 : Bank of Finland – Uncover liquidity needs of banks when Finland’s RTGS system was joined with TARGET – See Koponen-Soramaki (1998)• 2000 : Bank of Japan – Test features for BoJ-Net upgrade• 2001 : CLS approval process and ongoing oversight – Test risk management – Evaluate settlement’ members capacity for pay-ins – Understand how the system works• Since: Bank of Canada, Banque de France, Nederlandsche Bank, Norges Bank, Federal Reserve, and many others• 2010 - : Bank of England new CHAPS – Evaluate alternative liquidity saving mechanisms – Use as platform for discussions with banks – Denby-McLafferty (2011 forthcoming)
  • 5. Framework Source: Koponen-Soramäki (1997). Intraday liquidity needs in a modern interbank payment system - a Simulation Approach , Bank of Finland Studies in Economics and Finance 14.
  • 6. Topics Enhance Evaluate alternative understanding of design features system mechanics Why Simulate? Stress testing and Platform for liquidity needs communication analysis among stakeholders
  • 7. Research• Soramäki, Kimmo, M.L. Bech, J. Arnold, R.J. Glass and W.E. Beyeler (2007). "The Topology of Interbank Payment Flows". Physica A 379, pp. 317-333. Models payment flows as graphs (“Network topology”)• Beyeler, Walter, M.L Bech, R.J. Glass, and K. Soramäki (2007). "Congestion and Cascades in Payment Systems". Physica A 384(2), pp. 693-718. Models payment flow mechanics (“System mechanics”)• Galbiati, Marco and Kimmo Soramäki (2011). “Agent-based model of payment systems”. Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control 35(6), pp. 859-875. Models bank’s decision-making (“Economic behavior”)
  • 8. Topology of interactions Degree distribution Total of ~8000 banks 66 banks comprise 75% of value Soramäki, Bech, Beyeler, Glass and Arnold 25 banks completely connected (2006), Physica A, Vol. 379, pp 317-333.
  • 9. System mechanics Central bank4 Payment account Payment system 5 Payment accountis debited is credited Bi Bj 6 Depositor account3 Payment is settled is creditedor queued Qi Bi > 0 Di Liquidity Dj Qj > 0 Qj Market2 Depositor account Bank i Bank j 7 Queued payment,is debited if any, is released1 Agent instructsbank to send apayment Productive Agent Productive Agent Beyeler, Glass, Bech and Soramäki (2007), Physica A, 384-2, pp 693-718.
  • 10. Payment System Instructions Payments Time Liquidity TimeSummed overthe network,instructions When liquidity is higharrive at a steady payments are submitted Paymentsrate promptly and banks process payments independently of each other Instructions Beyeler, Glass, Bech and Soramäki (2007), Physica A, 384-2, pp 693-718.
  • 11. Payment System Instructions Payments Liquidity Time TimeReducing liquidity leads toepisodes of congestionwhen queues build, andcascades of settlement Frequency Paymentsactivity when incomingpayments allow banks towork off queues. Paymentprocessing becomes Cascade Lengthcoupled across the Instructionsnetwork Beyeler, Glass, Bech and Soramäki (2007), Physica A, 384-2, pp 693-718.
  • 12. System mechanics Central bank4 Payment account Payment system 5 Payment accountis debited is credited Bi Bj 6 Depositor account3 Payment is settled is creditedor queued Qi Bi > 0 Di Liquidity Dj Qj > 0 Qj Market2 Depositor account Bank i Bank j 7 Queued payment,is debited if any, is released1 Agent instructsbank to send apayment Productive Agent Productive Agent Beyeler, Glass, Bech and Soramäki (2007), Physica A, 384-2, pp 693-718.
  • 13. Simulations vs analytical models• Simulations (e.g. e.g. Koponen-Soramaki 1998, Leinonen, ed. 2005, work at FRB, ECB, BoC, BoJ, BoE) have so far not endogenized bank behaviour – behaviour has been assumed to remain unchanged in spite of other changes in the system – or to change in a predetermined manner – due to the use of actual data, difficult to generalize• Game theoretic models (e.g. Angelini 1998, Kobayakawa 1997, Bech-Garratt 2003) need to make many simplifying assumptions – on settlement process / payoffs – topology of interactions – do not give quantitative answers
  • 14. Economic behavior• Example: How much liquidity to post?• Cost for a bank in a payment system depends on – Choice of liquidity and – Delays of settlement• Banks liquidity choice depends on other banks’ liquidity choice• We develop ABM – payoffs determined by a realistic settlement process – reinforcement learning – look at equilibrium
  • 15. Funding behavior model• Dynamic model of an RTGS interbank payment system with endogenous choices for funding by banks – Banks choose an opening balance at the beginning of each day. Intraday payments are released whenever sufficient liquidity is available.• Banks have knowledge of settlement costs given their own liquidity and liquidity of other banks – Delays are evaluated by means of a large number of simulations of the “payment physics model” with different amounts of liquidity.• Bank learn about the behavior of other banks, and choose their own liquidity to minimize costs – On each round, banks choose a “best reply” given beliefs about what other banks choose. The beliefs are updated on subsequent rounds• We look at both normal operating conditions and an operational failure by one bank
  • 16. Learning in the model• In the model – Banks face uncertainty about the actions of other banks – Banks adapt their actions over time, depending on observed actions by others – This is modeled as fictitious play with given payoff functions – The game is played until convergence of beliefs takes place• Properties of Fictitious play – If beliefs converge to 1 for some action, that action is a pure Nash- equilibrium – If beliefs converge to a distribution, then that distribution is the mixed Nash equilibrium of the game• Our results – Beliefs converge mostly to a distribution, sometimes to a pure equilibrium – Results report weighted average in case of mixed equilibria
  • 17. Delays Galbiati and Soramäki (2011), JEDC, Vol. 35, Iss. 6, pp 859-875
  • 18. Payoffs• Recall, costs depend on own liquidity and others liquidity -> which jointly determine delays• Red = high price for liquidity, Blue = low price for liquidity
  • 19. Liquidity demand curve
  • 20. How to start? HR DATA TOOLS
  • 21. Data• Historical transaction data – From interbank payment systems – At minimum: date, time, sender, receiver, value – More data on type of payment, economic purpose, second tier (if any), type of institution, etc. useful• Artificial transaction data – Based on aggregates (possible with Entropy maximization methods) – Based on a network model (defining bilateral flows) – Assumptions • Timing of payments • Value distribution • Correlations – System stability (net flows 0 over longer times)
  • 22. Tools• Bof-PSS2 – Bank of Finland, 1997- (BoF-PSS1) – RTGS, RRGS, Net, many optimization methods – www.bof.fi/sc/bof-pss – Free, Support & training available, Annual workshop• FNA Flow – Soramaki Networks, 2009- – RTGS, RRGS, many optimization methods – www.fna.fi – Free online, License, Support & training available• Proprietary tools or general purpose programs – Matlab, SAS, Excel, …
  • 23. Thank youKimmo Soramäkikimmo@soramaki.net www.fna.fi

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