Facebook Policy Primer

564 views
473 views

Published on

Key features and related issues of the terms of use of Facebook.

Published in: Technology
3 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Hi Sophie,

    Your primer made for a good read. I thought you traversed through the many issues Facebook raises in terms of privacy, ownership, censorship and the like in a straightforward and logical manner. Like Monica, I particularly liked that you provided screenshots of the various icons relating to Facebook’s terms, as I think your primer would encourage users to go and find the settings and knowing what the icons look like is great.

    In talking about privacy on Facebook, I noticed you said that “maybe Facebook doesn’t really care about our privacy?” and I would think you could almost remove that ‘maybe’. An article on Wired detailed a letter Zuckerberg sent to potential investors before Facebook was floated on the stock market, in which he stated “Facebook was not originally created to be a company. It was built to accomplish a social mission - to make the world more open and connected” (Epicenter Staff, 2012). This would suggest, as Steafan alluded to, that privacy settings on Facebook are somewhat redundant, and I expect that over time we will see further erosion of privacy allowances on Facebook. If the grand goal of Facebook really is to “make the world more open and connected”, then it would make sense that the endgame is to make everything on Facebook public regardless of user intentions.

    I also liked that you included some examples of Facebook engaging in straight out censorship. It appears that inconsistent censorship is somewhat of a recurring PR headache for Facebook, as I came across a recent example of the kind of censorship Facebook enacts. Sauter (2013) details an example of Facebook changing its position on censoring content in a very short period of time, in relation to a violent video posted to the site. I could imagine that the content in question would be swiftly removed from most sites allowing content sharing, however given the sentiment expressed in the letter I referred to previously, it’s very curious that Facebook censors anything at all frankly. Perhaps their position on censorship is subject to the majority opinion, rather than their own idea of what should or shouldn’t be allowed on Facebook?

    Thanks for creating a thought-provoking and informative policy primer!

    -Ian

    Epicenter Staff. (2012, January 2). Mark Zuckerberg’s Letter to Investors: ‘The Hacker Way’. Wired. Available: http://www.wired.com/business/2012/02/zuck-letter/

    Sauter, T. (2013, October 25). Facebook goes full circle on censorship, like it or not. The Conversation. Available: http://theconversation.com/facebook-goes-full-circle-on-censorship-like-it-or-not-19488
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Hi Sophie,
    I really enjoyed your policy primer. I thought it presented the information with great clarity, and it certainly suitable for a generalist audience. I like the fact you started with a short description of Facebook and what users can do by using the service. This is something I wish I had thought to do in my policy primer. I also like how you have taken a screenshot of Facebook’s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities, Data Use Policy and Community Standards to visualise to viewers exactly what they should look for if they were to search them after viewing this policy primer. I like how you carry this throughout your policy primer, as this would surely reduce users’ time in searching for these on the Facebook website.
    I think design wise you present a very engaging presentation, with the layout, font and font colour and size allowing the information to be conveyed quickly and with ease.
    I really like how you talk the users through the terms of use by explaining them in your own words as well as direct quotes from Facebook. I considered Facebook for my policy primer and was astounded at how much content that was not easy to understand there was! You have unquestionably done a great job in simplifying this mass of information down into a manageable piece of information that can be viewed a lot easier than all those words!

    I looked at Instagram and before investigating the Terms of Use, believed content ownership to be the same as Facebook, in that Facebook owns your content and can do with it what they please. This is not the case as, “Instagram does not claim ownership of any content that you post on or through the service. Instead, you hereby grant to Instagram a non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license to use the Content that you post on or through the Service”(Instagram, 2013). What are your thoughts on ownership varying between these two platforms? Does the breadth of content available to be uploaded to Facebook change the users’ right to own their own content or not?

    Thanks, Monica.

    Instagram. Terms Of Use. (2013). Retrieved October 6, 2013, from http://instagram.com
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Hi Sophie,

    I really liked your Facebook policy presentation; it flowed logically and was easy to follow. I also did my presentation on Facebook’ terms and conditions and was interested to compare my presentation with yours. Largely I think we tackled Facebooks policies in a similar manner by breaking down all the various parts explaining and elaborating on their implications.
    The ownership of content on Facebook I took to understand is still the property of the user but is under license to Facebook to use as they wish as long as it is on Facebook. Preceding the part you reference states:

    ‘You own all of the content and information you post on Facebook, and you can control how it is shared through your privacy and application settings’ (Statement of Rights and Responsibilities, 2012).

    Although I agree that for all practical purposes this is the same thing as far as Facebook’s ability to use the content a user posts, the content is still owned by the user. The content is not solely under user control as long as it is on Facebook, but I would argue that this is different to the content becoming Facebook’s property, would you agree?

    I also think that privacy on Facebook is to a point somewhat of an oxymoron. Social networking sites are about sharing content and information with other users and therefore much of the privacy measures to me seem to be a bit pointless. I think what needs to the onus needs to be on users to control the content and information they share. Goettke and Christiana argue that Facebook suffers from three main factors: users include too much information about themselves, Facebook does not have good enough privacy settings people actively seek user information on Facebook (2007, p.2). I would argue that the most prevalent factor is users including too much information about themselves online. Self censorship is the most important thing when operating on social networking sites such as Facebook.

    Cheers,
    Steaf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
564
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
3
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Facebook Policy Primer

  1. 1. Facebook Policy Primer Key features and related issues of the terms of use of Facebook. BySophie Galati
  2. 2. What is Facebook?  A free social networking service.  Where you can create your own personal profile.  Allows you to easily interact with friends and family online.  Used for sharing content, posting status’, instant messaging.
  3. 3. Facebook users must agree to certain terms of use.
  4. 4. Did you read the terms of use of Facebook when you joined?
  5. 5. Did you read the terms of use of Facebook when you joined? It’s likely that you didn’t. The majority of Internet users admit to not reading the terms of use of online platforms or services, simply because they are boring or difficult to understand (Smithers, 2011).
  6. 6. This presentation will summarise the key features of Facebook’s terms of use and the concerns that they raise.  These concerns relate to Internet politics and power and include:  Ownership of Content  Privacy  Surveillance  Censorship  Freedom of Expression
  7. 7. A significant concept discussed within Facebook’s terms of use is the: Ownership of Content
  8. 8.  When you upload content to Facebook, it becomes Facebook’s property.  It is their property until you have deleted it.
  9. 9.  When you upload content to Facebook, it becomes Facebook’s property.  It is their property until you have deleted it.  Unless, of course, your friend also has a copy of the content.
  10. 10. What exactly does “…transferable, sublicensable, royalty free, worldwide license…” mean?
  11. 11. This means that Facebook can license your content to others for free without obtaining your approval (Delsack, 2012).
  12. 12. Facebook’s terms of use should rightfully spark concerns about Privacy
  13. 13. Even if you consider yourself to be private online, that doesn’t mean others can’t and won’t share your information.
  14. 14. In Facebook’s Data Use Policy, the following is stated: “We receive information about you from your friends and others, such as when they upload your contact information, post a photo of you, tag you in a photo or status update, or at a location, or add you to a group…”
  15. 15. So, even if you feel in control of the content you yourself share, You should also be aware of the information that Facebook receives about you from others.
  16. 16. To ensure a more increased privacy, you should utliseFacebook’s privacy settings to manage who can see the content you post and who can contact you.
  17. 17. However, even if you are cautious or attentive with your privacy settings, Facebook’s terms of use includes the following statement: “Sometimes you will not be able to select an audience when you post something. This is because some types of stories are always public stories.”
  18. 18. However, even if you are cautious or attentive with your privacy settings, Facebook’s terms of use includes the following statement: “Sometimes you will not be able to select an audience when you post something. This is because some types of stories are always public stories.” Therefore,you should always be careful about what information you choose to share.
  19. 19. Facebook no longer allows users to be “unsearchable”  A recent change to Facebook’s privacy settings means that all users can now be searchable on the site.  Luckily, only content that users have publically shared will be available to those outside of their network (Wagner, 2013).  However, if you desire to be almost completely private on Facebook,it is no longer possible.
  20. 20. A main concern for privacy is Facebook’s reliance on advertising. “Online marketers and other Internet companies seek to profit from the Internet’s unique ability to track the comings and goings of users, allowing for more focused and therefore more lucrative advertising” (Zeller, 2006). With a social network as popular and comprehensive as Facebook, it is no exception for this sought after profit.
  21. 21. “…we may use the information we receive about you to measure or understand the effectiveness of ads you and others see…”  This snippet from the terms of use raises questions that maybe Facebook doesn’t really care about our privacy?  Social networking sites don’t just focus on individuals, they predominantly focus on making a profit from turning user data into trends and patterns (Stoddart, 2007).  This insufficient lack of care for individuals extends from a lack of care of their privacy.
  22. 22. Surveillance  Surveillance can be referred to as “a focused attention to personal details aimed at exerting influence over or managing the objects of the data” (Lyon, 2002).  This is a significant mode of governance in information societies and exists among Facebook.
  23. 23. “We receive data about you whenever you interact with Facebook, such as when you look at another person’s timeline, send or receive a message, search for a friend or a Page, click on, view or otherwise interact with things, use a Facebook mobile app, or purchase Facebook Credits or make other purchases through Facebook.”
  24. 24. “We receive data about you whenever you interact with Facebook, such as when you look at another person’s timeline, send or receive a message, search for a friend or a Page, click on, view or otherwise interact with things, use a Facebook mobile app, or purchase Facebook Credits or make other purchases through Facebook.” So, pretty much everything you do on Facebook, even the simple act of searching for something, is under surveillance.
  25. 25. Information Facebook is probably collecting from you: (Couts 2012)
  26. 26. The notion of surveillance can lead to the related issue of: Censorship
  27. 27. “We also impose limitations on the display of nudity. We aspire to respect people’s right to share content of personal importance, whether those are photos of a sculpture like Michelangelo's David or family photos of a child breastfeeding.”
  28. 28. In theory, this is a beneficial term of use for Facebook users as it:  Limits the risk of sharing pornographic content,  Restricts immoral and illegal content, such as child pornography.  Regulates the sharing of content that can be harmful to Facebook’s broad audience.
  29. 29. This has however led to undeserved censorship.  Erik Ravelo’s artwork was censored by Facebook and he has been prevented from uploading more images.  The controversial nature of the artwork about issues plaguing children is assumed to be the reason for its censorship.  The artwork does not feature (Ravelo, 2012). nudity, pornography and isn’t threatening, which raises questions about the amount of power and control Facebook is exuding.
  30. 30. The censorship on Facebook can raise concerns about the related issue of: the freedom of expression
  31. 31. Freedom of Expression  The Internet offers a great opportunity for users to easily make their thoughts and opinions available to a large audience (Fisher, 2001).  When analysingFacebook’s terms of use, this opportunity isn’t necessarily obtainable.
  32. 32. “You will not post content that is hate speech, threatening or pornographic” (Safety, #7)
  33. 33.  Users are not free to post whatever they please.  In most cases, this is for the benefit of all other users, creating an appropriate and safe network.  It can still be said that the limitations within Facebook’s terms of use and its resulting control can undermine a user’s freedom.
  34. 34. In conclusion, the key features of Facebook’s terms of use:  Ownership of content  As soon as you upload content to Facebook, it becomes Facebook’s content as well.  Facebook can do with it as they please.  Privacy  Your information can be received from others as well as yourself.  Facebook’s dependence on advertising has empowered them to collect data from users, disregarding their privacy.
  35. 35.  Surveillance  Facebook keeps track of your Facebook activity.  Censorship  There are limits on what you can and cannot post.  Facebook has the ability to remove content that they believe goes against their terms.  Freedom of Expression  Users are not free to share anything they want.  There is content that is prohibited.  This can be beneficial, creating a safe and appropriate network for all users.
  36. 36. The key features of Facebook’s terms of use policies evidently raise concerns that involve all users I hope that this presentation has helped you to better understand Facebook’s policies and how it affects you.
  37. 37. References Couts, A. (2012) Terms & Conditions: Facebook's 'Data Use Policy' Explained. Retrieved 12 October, 2013 from: http://www.digitaltrends.com/social-media/terms-conditions-facebooks-data-use-policyexplained/ Delsack, C (2012). Who Owns Photos and Videos Posted on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter? Retrieved 12 October, 2013 from: http://www.nyccounsel.com/business-blogs-websites/who-ownsphotos-and-videos-posted-on-facebook-or-twitter/ Facebook. (2012). Facebook Terms and Policies. Facebook. Retrieved 8 September, 2013 from: www.facebook.com/policies. Fisher, W. (2001). Freedom of Expression on the Internet . Retrieved September 8, 2013, from The BerkmanCenter for Internet & Society: http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/ilaw/Speech/ Lyon, D. (2002) “Everday Surveillance: Personal Data and Social Classification.” Information, Communication and Society 5, no. 1 Retrieved from: http://www.casa.ucl.ac.uk/cyberspace/lyon_ics.pdf Ravelo, E. (2012) “Fast Food.” [image] Fabrica. The Untouchables. Stoddart, J (2007) Privacy and Social Networks. Retrieved 9 October, 2013 from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7gWEgHeXcA&feature=player_embedded Smithers, R. (2011) Terms and Conditions: Not Reading the Small Print can Mean Big Problems. The Guardian. Retrieved 2 October, 2013, from: http://www.theguardian.com/money/2011/may/11/terms-conditions-small-print-big-problems Images have been screen-shot from Facebook. Surveillance image is from Microsoft’s clipart collection.

×