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Spatiotemporal Mashups: A Survey of Current Tools to Inform Next Generation Crisis Support - ISCRAM 2009 Conference
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Spatiotemporal Mashups: A Survey of Current Tools to Inform Next Generation Crisis Support - ISCRAM 2009 Conference

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ISCRAM 2009 Conference for the Human-Computer Interaction track on Interactive Map Technologies session …

ISCRAM 2009 Conference for the Human-Computer Interaction track on Interactive Map Technologies session

Abstract: Developments in information and communication technology (ICT) have adjusted the opportunities for spatial and temporal representations of data, possibly permitting the simultaneous visualization of how different regions and populations are affected during large-scale emergencies and crises. We surveyed 13 crisis-related mashups to derive some high-level design directions to guide the design and testing of next generation crisis support tools. The current web mashups offer a new way of looking at how crises are spatiotemporally ordered. However, since all technology is constrained by limitations of design choice, examining the limits and possibilities of what current design choices afford can inform attributes of what next generation crisis support tools would require.

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  • People use the dimensions of time and place to explain how such a crisis develops to make sense of its impact on society. We all care about designing crisis support tools. Our research lab particularly cares about what technology does to our understanding of how crises play out in time and place. In my current research, I am not only interested in how to use this data in the immediate-term but also in the long-term. Therefore, in this paper, we suggest some design directions to help make sense of crisis data useful in the long-term.
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    • 1. SOPHIA B. LIU AND LEYSIA PALEN CONNECTIVIT LAB UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT BOULDER, USA April 19, 2009 (Talk: May 11, 2009) ISCRAM 2009 – Gothenburg, Sweden
    • 2. SPATIAL ZONES SOCIO-TEMPORAL STAGES
    • 3.
      • Make visible and constrain perceived social ordering depending on the design choices
      • How information is displayed can affect social behavior and support understanding of crises
      • Design choices of crisis-related web mashups
    • 4.
      • Mashups combine data or functionality from two or more sources into a single integrated application
      • To provide a new service, to present information in a new way, and/or to create a new user experience
      • Web mashups possibly challenge and/or extend space-and-time models to inform technology design
    • 5. 13 Crisis-related Web Mashups
    • 6.
    • 7.
    • 8.
    • 9.
    • 10.
    • 11.
    • 12.
    • 13.
    • 14.
    • 15. In the Context of ICTs
    • 16. SPATIAL ZONES SOCIO-TEMPORAL STAGES
    • 17.
      • Disasters should more accurately be viewed as processual phenomena (Oliver-Smith, 2001)
        • Often considered an event rather than a process
        • Physical and social event/processes
        • Socially constructed and experienced differently
        • Multiple interpretations of an event/process
      • Spatial zones and temporal phases are not discrete but rather multidimensional (Neal, 1997)
        • Social time rather than objective time
        • Multiple perceptions from different stakeholders
    • 18.
      • “ Space of flows” (Castells, 1996)
        • Social interaction across multiple places
        • Constellation of information, people, and artifacts
        • New spatial form shaped by the network society
      • “ Timeless time” (Castells, 1996)
        • Transforming human time in socio-technical context
        • Mix of tenses: Simultaneity and Timelessness
        • Displaying diverse temporalities
    • 19.
      • 3 design directions to guide the technology design and user testing of next generation crisis support tools
      • Knowledge granularity from temporal collages
      • Learning from the past through data preservation
      • Recognizing geographical vulnerabilities
    • 20.
      • Diverse temporalities mixing tenses (Castells, 1996)
      • Simultaneity of real-time updates at the macro level
      • Replay data backwards and forwards in time
    • 21.
      • Potential for chaotic clutter of information
      • Never-ending timeline allows for projected reports
      • Power in visualizing the past, present, and potential futures simultaneously
      • Diverse temporalities mixing tenses (Castells, 1996)
      • Simultaneity of real-time updates at the macro level
      • Replay data backwards and forwards in time
    • 22.
      • Preserving time-sensitive information could support investigative, forensic, and heritage-preserving efforts
      • Past spatiotemporal data can inform future vulnerabilities in the same geographical region
      • Preservation of and easy accessibility to historic data
    • 23.
      • Spatial trends provide visual indications of geographical vulnerabilities
      • Clustering and patterning of icons help point out known geographical vulnerabilities
      • Use multidimensional or dynamic icons
      • Designing features that externalize geographical vulnerabilities based on geological, scientific, and/or socio-behavioral data
    • 24.
      • Current mashups offer a new way to visualize crisis-related spatiotemporal data and social organization
      • 3 high-level design directions to guide future design and testing for next generation crisis support tools
      • Certain design choices afford different forms of interaction and understanding of data
      • Current design choices illustrate crises as processual by displaying data not typically visualized
    • 25. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation: NSF Graduate Fellowship NSF CAREER Grant IIS-0546315 EMAIL: Sophia.Liu@colorado.edu FACEBOOK: Sophia B Liu TWITTER: sophiabliu