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What Customers Want: The Brand Experience
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What Customers Want: The Brand Experience

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An insight on the evolution of consumer behavior, from modernism to postmodernism, and its reflection on marketing techniques, with a specific focus on brand experience and on experiential marketing. ...

An insight on the evolution of consumer behavior, from modernism to postmodernism, and its reflection on marketing techniques, with a specific focus on brand experience and on experiential marketing. Considerations on brand awareness, brand perception, customer engagement.

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    What Customers Want: The Brand Experience What Customers Want: The Brand Experience Presentation Transcript

    • Sonja Albanese – Roma, November 2013
    • Contents • Introduction • Historical overview  From utilitarian to experiential consumption • A portrait of the new type of demand  The experiential consumer  Modern vs Postmodern consumer • What customers want  The value of the brand  The brand experience  Successful examples of brand experience What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 1
    • Contents • The evolution of communication  The decline of traditional marketing  From traditional to experiential marketing • Providing the experience  The experiental marketing approach  Some successful tools • Considerations What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 2
    • Introduction (1/2) “ Products are made in the factory, but brands are created in the mind. ” Walter Landor What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 3
    • Introduction (2/2)  How do consumers become “brand aware”?  Which are the factors that render a brand memorable? What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 4
    • Historical overview (1/7) From utilitarian to experiential consumption Researchers tend to agree on the rise, since the early 90s, of a new level of consumption based on a different type of interaction with products, that favors an emotional and perceptive relation to a possession end to itself. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 5
    • Historical overview (2/7) From utilitarian to experiential consumption The shift from utilitarian to experiential consumption can be related to the deep transition occurring at the beginning of the century from modernism to postmodernism. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 6
    • Historical overview (3/7) From utilitarian to experiential consumption Thanks to the interactive structure of digital media consumers are no longer passive targets of advertising, but active speakers in the corporate communication process. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 7
    • Historical overview (4/7) From utilitarian to experiential consumption “ What they want are products, communications, and marketing campaigns that arouse the senses, touch their hearts, and stimulate their minds. ” Bernd H. Schmitt What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 8
    • Historical overview (5/7) From utilitarian to experiential consumption Through blogs, forums, applications they are able to exchange information with other consumers and even to get in touch directly with manufacturers providing their personal insight into products. Since the advent of new media a new need has arisen: a need for engagement, for participation, for experience... What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 9
    • Historical overview (6/7) From utilitarian to experiential consumption From a theoretical perspective, the main utilitarian logic adopted in consumer behavior studies is revolutionized. In 2005 Arnould and Thompson, with their Consumer Culture Theory (CCT), establish a new focus on brand experience. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 10
    • Historical overview (7/7) From utilitarian to experiential consumption What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 11
    • A portrait of the new type of demand (1/4) The experiential consumer Postmodern consumers live in a dynamic and fragmented society, that is overwhelmed with information and accelerated by the pace of innovation. Products are used by them to build a sense of “self”, a social image that defines their role within society. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 12
    • A portrait of the new type of demand (2/4) The experiential consumer Unlike their predecessors, they are not just focused on the products’ functionality but they also greatly value the products’ contribution to the construction of their own identity. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 13
    • A portrait of the new type of demand (3/4) The experiential consumer This contribution is made of a combination of meanings, values, symbols: factors which are all enclosed in the intricate concept of the brand. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 14
    • A portrait of the new type of demand (4/4) Modern vs Postmodern consumer What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 15
    • What customers want (1/6) The value of the brand In contemporary consumer culture, brands are more than just names or graphic signs: they constitute means of communication that possess a unique identity and represent a distinctive value for each customer. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 16
    • What customers want (2/6) The brand experience By experiencing a brand, consumers achieve a psychological and social state of mind that provides desirable perceptions and sensations related to the values enclosed by the brand itself. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 17
    • What customers want (3/6) The brand experience Unlike in modern age, in experiential postmodern era value is not created during the production process but in the act of consumption. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 18
    • What customers want (4/6) Successful examples of brand experience Quality, design, innovation. Apple is not just technology, it’s a status. Its products provide a rich, sophisticated, interactive technological experience that is valued both for its utility and for the status quo it provides to users. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 19
    • What customers want (5/6) Successful examples of brand experience Just coffee? No, Starbucks is more than that. Starbucks is a lifestyle. Its big cups, its welcoming shops and its free wifi are meant to let the consumer slowly savour the coffee and in the meantime enjoy a relaxing and satisfying experience while keeping in touch with the rest of the world. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 20
    • What customers want (6/6) Successful examples of brand experience High definition graphics, compelling plots, realistic gameplay: Ubisoft makes adventurous dreams come to life. The games of the french video game developer provide an engaging and satisfactory break in our daily routine. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 21
    • The evolution of communication (1/4) The decline of traditional marketing Changes brought by information age in the consumption system have completely changed the communication approach towards consumers. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 22
    • The evolution of communication (2/4) The decline of traditional marketing On one side, the mediatic fragmentation caused by the continuous and rapid development of the telecommunication industry keeps reducing the range of traditional media and forces marketers to research new ways to communicate effectively. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 23
    • The evolution of communication (3/4) The decline of traditional marketing On the other side, customers’ new needs for emotions and enhanced control over information make traditional media obsolete and require new marketing schemes that focus on engagement as a crucial aspect in the costruction of a long-term relationship with the brand. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 24
    • The evolution of communication (4/4) From traditional to experiential marketing What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 25
    • Providing the experience (1/7) The experiental marketing approach Being aware of consumers’ basic knowledge of traditional advertising techniques as well as of their skepticism towards standard media, experiential marketers try to create an effective communication while veiling the persuasive intention beyond it. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 26
    • Providing the experience (2/7) The experiental marketing approach Their main goal is to capture the essence of the brand with creativity, immagination and innovation by providing an unforgettable experience, a memory of the product that remains well imprinted in the user’s brain. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 27
    • Providing the experience (3/7) The experiental marketing approach To ensure success, experiential strategies mainly focus on the drivers of brand experience: • engagement • empathy • symbolic value What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 28
    • Providing the experience (4/7) Some successful tools • Product placement This experiential technique consists in inserting a product or a brand in movies or in tv shows. It captures the attention of the audience and uses its emotional engagement in order to build brand awareness. Ray-Ban Aviator glasses in Top Gun (1986) What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 29
    • Providing the experience (5/7) Some successful tools Price ($) Reflection of the price on sales 150 According to Times Magazine, sales of the Ray-Ban Aviator rose by 40% after the release of Top Gun in 1986. 100 50 0 Before the release After the release What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 30
    • Providing the experience (6/7) Some successful tools • Branded entertainment This experiential technique may be considered as the evolution of the former. It is used to insert a brand or a product in the most diverse entertainment contexts such as video games, tv series, books, music videos. Magnum’s advergame Pleasure Hunt (2011) What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 31
    • Providing the experience (7/7) Some successful tools Recall after gameplay 100 In 2006 Winkler & Buckner used memory-based measures to asses the effectiveness of advergames. After gameplay, 86% of respondents remembered seeing the brand logo and 97% could also recall one specific logo position. 95 Gameplayers 90 (%) 85 80 Logo Logo position What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 32
    • Considerations (1/3) Many companies still consider experiential marketing as a “plus”, a marginal or unnecessary tool within the corporate communication portfolio. Most of them believe that these marketing approaches don’t have the same effectiveness of traditional techniques failing to consider that new trends in consumer behaviors require strategical changes. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 33
    • Considerations (2/3) In today’s socio-economic context, marketers should stop thinking like marketers and start thinking like consumers. In order to provide an effective experience, they should adopt the point of view of brand users, i.e. of persons who are daily bombared with information and who seek refuge in the consistency of a sensation, an emotional vibration. What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 34
    • Considerations (3/3)  What do I expect from this specific brand?  Which experience do I want it to make me live?  Which emotions do I want it to make me feel? What customers want: The brand experience – Roma, November 2013 35
    • (Bernd H. Schmitt, 2007) Sonja Albanese – Roma, November 2013