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"Everybody is a Somebody" A Dialogue on Classism in Cooperative Extension

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    "Everybody is a Somebody" A Dialogue on Classism in Cooperative Extension "Everybody is a Somebody" A Dialogue on Classism in Cooperative Extension Presentation Transcript

    • TitleDate XX, XXXX
      “Everybody is a Somebody”…
      A Dialogue on Classism in Cooperative Extension
      Liz Hilts, Western District Program Associate
      Deb Jones, Western District Director
      October 21, 2010
    • CE Values…Inclusiveness
      We recognize, appreciate and honor the differences, similarities and contributions of all people and communities. We are intentional in our efforts to ensure equity, justice and fairness. We embrace new ideas and approaches in our work.
    • Robert Fuller in Somebodies and Nobodies (2003) suggests that rank divides us into "somebodies" and "nobodies." More than most care to admit, we treat others--and are treated by others--based on our relative rank. The truth is that each of us has felt like a somebody some times and a nobody at others. A key to feeling like a somebody is being recognized by others. Without recognition from others, we may feel discounted, disconnected, marginal, or even invisible.
      Somebodies and Nobodies
    • Somebodies and Nobodies
      • Contribute your thinking
      • Speak with your mind and your heart
      • Listen together for deeper insights and understanding
      • All perspectives will be respected
      • After the session, we can share what we said…not what others said
      Ground rules
      • Think about the people you work with daily.
      • Draw a diagram of your work team and how they relate to each other
      • Draw the team as it “feels” to you…NOT as it may appear on the organizational chart.
      • Some examples…
      Let’s Get Started…
    • Example 1
      Open loop
    • Example 2
      Closed loop
    • Example 3
      Someone Else
      Someone
      Just started…don’t know what I’m doing
      Doin’ my own thing
      Need help
      Don’t care what anyone else is doing
      Been here forever
      Another someone
      Send help
      Out in the field…never in the office
      No loop!!
    • Sharing and Discussion
    • Nobodies Feel…
      Overlooked
      Discouraged
      Disrespected
      Excluded
      Demeaned
      Shamed
      Less-than-zero
    • Somebodies Feel…
      Noticed
      Encouraged
      Welcomed
      Appreciated
      Respected
      Included
      Esteemed
      Loved
    • I feel like a “nobody” when…
    • I feel like a “somebody”…
      Participate as a resource and assistant with all colleagues
      Attend meetings and share ideas as an equal contributor
      Part of marketing initiative and movement
      Part of internship recruitment
      New Orleans Cultural Immersion participant
      My ideas are important for what I contribute; not based on rank.
    • I Feel Like a Nobody When…
      I Feel Like a Somebody When…
    • Organizational Culture
      Organizational silence is a barrier that occurs when individuals or groups feel compelled to remain silent in the face of issues, problems or concerns. Organizations lose vital information necessary for making change.
      Some work place cultures retard innovation by focusing on the way things have always been done.
    • Have you ever been in a situation where you have remained silent even though you had information important for the decision or problem?
      What contributed to your silence?
    • How are we doing in CE?
      Small group discussion:
      Things we do well
      Barriers to inclusion
      Large group sharing
    • Western District Examples
      Terminology:
      Never “academic staff”; “faculty”
      “Educators”
      Colleagues
      All colleagues in the office participate in Civil Rights Days
      County support staff are recognized on birthdays, Administrative Professional Day, and with an annual in-service
      Recognize office teams at district meetings
    • Where do we go from here?
      Everyone has a role and shares responsibility
      Difficult conversations
      They are more about US than THEM
      It’s the RIGHT thing to do
      Change is not created without dialogue
    • Where do we go from here?
    • To really comprehend rankism, we must be changemakers.
    • "Inclusion is a process of identifying, understanding and breaking down barriers to participation and belonging.“ Author Unknown 
    • TitleDate XX, XXXX
      “Everybody is a Somebody”…
      A Dialogue on Classism in Cooperative Extension
      Liz Hilts, Western District Program Associate
      Deb Jones, Western District Director
      October 21, 2010