2010 Connections and Engagement
Conference
October 21, 2010
Professor Andrew Lewis
Maria Alvarez-Stroud
John Pederson
Buil...
Presentation Outcomes
 Build awareness of broadband & its
importance to community
sustainability
 Expand understanding o...
Name This Technology
Once upon a time…..
http://localtechwire.com/business/local_tech_w
Why U.W. Extension?
Building Organizational Capacity
 It describes the work of the university’s extension
faculty in building some of the sta...
The Road to Prosperity
What is Broadband?
Federal Communication Commission (FCC)
definition:
• Any connection that transfers data at
speeds great...
Context
What is broadband?
1 Gbps: ‘Broadband’
as
‘Broadband’: Dial-up
What is Broadband?
http://www.linktionary.com/b/bandwidth.html
Don’t confuse promising new tools with
panaceas
“In short, access to telecommunications
technology may be a necessary cond...
Context
Why is broadband important?
Digital exclusion costs
$55 billion annually.
Percentage Increase in the Number of
High Speed Lines (’03-’08)
Percentage of High Speed Lines for
Business Use (June 2008)
Our Role
 Build community leadership
 Link broadband expertise &
knowledge with the communities
 Create opportunity for...
The $7.2 Billion Dollar Solution??
Project Background
 Failed Round 1 attempt
 Engaged demonstration communities
 Engaged partners
 Wrote grant applicati...
The Journey to Engagement
Chippewa Valley
Platteville
Superior
Wausau
Menominee Nation
Comprehensive Community
Infrastructure (CCI) & Sustainable
Broadband Adoption (SBA)
Building Community Capacity through
Br...
The Journey to Engagement
Principles
 Mutual benefit
 Extension as facilitator
 Community ownership
 Public-private partnership
 Advancement of...
Sustaining the Engagement
 Organizational design
 Communication
 Shared vision
 Shared results
WiscNet
CAN’s
Programming
 Community Area Networks
 How to lead together
 Broadband use to improve quality
of life & local economy
Development & Education
 Broadband use webinars
 Virtual Inventors & Entrepreneurs Club
 Awareness/marketing campaign
...
Awareness Campaign
 Community-based
 Statewide
Evaluation & Metrics
 Phone survey/state broadband
planning/mapping project
 Broadband preparedness index
 Qualitative ...
Your Role
How many of you are engaged in
building community capacity
through broadband?
Thank you!
Maria Alvarez-Stroud
Project Manager
Building Community Capacity
through Broadband
Office of Community
Sustaina...
Thank you!
John Pederson
Educational Technology Liaison
WiscNet - Wisconsin's Research and
Education Network
johnpederson@...
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Building Community Capacity through Broadband

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  • Please indulge me while I tell you a quick story about an important technology. This technology changed the lives of urban residents, transformed communities and created new economic opportunities for businesses in Wisconsin’s cities. However, most rural homes, farms and businesses didn’t have access to this technology. The low population density and distances between rural households and communities meant too little demand relative to the high cost of constructing a delivery network and thus little potential for profit. As a result, rural America went without service for over two decades. Rural residents, communities and businesses that wanted access had to finance the infrastructure themselves. When they did, the prevailing rates were commonly twice as high as urban rates. What was this powerful and essential technology? Electricity Local rural leaders responded by creating rural electric cooperatives. With low-interest loans from the Rural Electrification Administration (REA), local coops built networks of transmission lines and provided farmers with electricity. The task of organizing rural electric cooperatives was generally left to local leaders; they organized meetings, collected fees, enrolled consumers, and worked with the REA on program details. Here in Wisconsin, on May 7, 1937, the states first co-op, the Richland Electric Cooperative, went into service. The founding President of the Richland Electric Cooperative was Richland County Extension Agent A.V. (Vernon) Miller who served as President until 1943. Within fifteen years, 90% of American farms had electricity2
  • In Celebration of Wisconsin’s Sesquicentennial, retired Dean, Ayse Somersan wrote this book in 1997.
  • Historically communities developed along important waterways, then stage coach roads , riailroads and highways (and other infrastructure like mills and electicity).  Why?  Access to markets.  Where is your nearest on-ramp to the world-market via the Internet ? How many lanes does it have and what is the speed limit?  Successful communities and their businesses in the next years will be those that tap into this huge potential.  Successful communities will be those that bring this essential infrastructure to their community. 
  • The Federal Communications Commission defines broadband as any connection that transfers data at speeds greater than 768 kilo bits per second.There is a problem with the idea that – if it’s not dial-up, it must be broadband.Do not confuse broadband with “really fast.”An alternative definition is connection that does not limit applications such as Voice Over Internet Protocol and web-based video streaming.
  • Judson Edwards concludes that “access to telecommunications technology may be a necessary condition for rural economic growth, but it is far from sufficient. We have to provide broadband access….and teach people and businesses how to maximize its use for improved public safety, governmental services, telemedicine and electronic commerce.
  • Digital exclusion has a huge impact – more than $55 billion annually, including $15 billion in lost economic opportunities and $15 billion in health care costs.
  • While Wisconsin is adding high-speed lines, we’re not adding them as fast as the country as a whole or as fast as our neighboring states: 381% increase in Wis. vs 478% in US and 572% in Iowa.
  • Wisconsin is behind neighboring states’ & US averages in the percentage of high-speed lines providing broadband connectivity for business use (28% compared to 40% US and Minnesota averages ).Wisconsin also is behind in connecting farms.Of Wisconsin farms, 29 percent have high-speed Internet access vs. 33% in US (2007 data).
  • The Broadband Technology Opportunities program launched this year provides some hope for helping us bridge the divide but its not going to solve the problem. The second and last phase of this funding was announced this month, and like the rural electrification example I gave you earlier, U.W. Extension will be submitting an application that proposes to increase the level of connectivity in 5 pilot communities, that the rest of the state can learn from. Those communities are Superior, The Chippewa Valley, Wausau, the Menominee Nation and Platteville.
  • CCI = $42.7 million ($29.9 request, $9.2 cash match, $3.6 in-kind contribution)SBA = $3.4 million ($2.4 request, $753,845 cash match, $221,096 in-kind contribution)
  • Demonstration communities benefitting from the $29.9-million Comprehensive Community Infrastructure grant are the Chippewa Valley region, Platteville, Superior and Wausau. The $2.4-million Sustainable Broadband Adoption grant benefits those four communities and the Menominee Nation with outreach and education.The project – known as Building Community Capacity through Broadband – is supported by additional donations in the form of cash or in-kind contributions by local and statewide partners.
  • I would like to point out that most of the money that is being requested will actually be spent on private sector services. However, the money will go to vendors that chose to bid on the request for services and some companies like AT&T opted not to do that.
  • *A Community Area Network is the interconnection of community anchor institutions (such as schools, libraries, colleges, universities, municipalities, hospitals) within a region through network services delivered primarily via optical fiber.*The institutions build networks that meet current and future needs identified by the served institutions. *A Community Area Network also is a consortium of organizations organized to manage the fiber-based network services and to deliver community-focused education regarding advanced broadband uses.*Examples of Wisconsin CANs include: CINC (Chippewa Valley Inter-Networking Consortium) and PCAN (Platteville Community Area Network). 
  • These are the principles that guided our work.
  • Your handout includes details about the planned broadband leadership development & educational programming.
  • Your handout on the BCCB Awareness Campaign includes details on the *community-based campaign through Community Area Networks and local broadband coalitions* and the statewide campaign through ICS, WPT, WPR and the BCCB website.
  • Building Community Capacity through Broadband

    1. 1. 2010 Connections and Engagement Conference October 21, 2010 Professor Andrew Lewis Maria Alvarez-Stroud John Pederson Building Community Capacity Through Broadband
    2. 2. Presentation Outcomes  Build awareness of broadband & its importance to community sustainability  Expand understanding of the role of engagement in building healthy communities  Stimulate thinking about UWEX’s role in building broadband capacity
    3. 3. Name This Technology Once upon a time….. http://localtechwire.com/business/local_tech_w
    4. 4. Why U.W. Extension?
    5. 5. Building Organizational Capacity  It describes the work of the university’s extension faculty in building some of the state (and nation’s) great organizations and movements.  “There is a formula to this history,” said Somersan. “It has to do with the people involved in creating self-sustaining organizations and movements. They have all been tops in their field, they all had a deep passion for what they were doing. They had very strong bonds with community leaders, partnered very well with others, and were willing to do the grunt work it takes to nurture organizations from birth to graduation.”
    6. 6. The Road to Prosperity
    7. 7. What is Broadband? Federal Communication Commission (FCC) definition: • Any connection that transfers data at speeds greater than 768 kbps Problem: • Medical Transmissions (Up to 50 mbits/sec) • Full Motion Video (1 -2 gbits/sec) Alternative definition: • Connection that does not limit application (i.e. VoIP, web-based video streaming)
    8. 8. Context What is broadband? 1 Gbps: ‘Broadband’ as ‘Broadband’: Dial-up
    9. 9. What is Broadband? http://www.linktionary.com/b/bandwidth.html
    10. 10. Don’t confuse promising new tools with panaceas “In short, access to telecommunications technology may be a necessary condition for rural economic growth, but it is far from sufficient.” (Digital Deliverance, p. xiv) Dr. Judson Edwards, Director of the Center for International Business, Troy University
    11. 11. Context Why is broadband important? Digital exclusion costs $55 billion annually.
    12. 12. Percentage Increase in the Number of High Speed Lines (’03-’08)
    13. 13. Percentage of High Speed Lines for Business Use (June 2008)
    14. 14. Our Role  Build community leadership  Link broadband expertise & knowledge with the communities  Create opportunity for innovation
    15. 15. The $7.2 Billion Dollar Solution??
    16. 16. Project Background  Failed Round 1 attempt  Engaged demonstration communities  Engaged partners  Wrote grant applications  Implementation
    17. 17. The Journey to Engagement Chippewa Valley Platteville Superior Wausau Menominee Nation
    18. 18. Comprehensive Community Infrastructure (CCI) & Sustainable Broadband Adoption (SBA) Building Community Capacity through Broadband (BCCB) CCI = $42.7 million ($29.9 request, $9.2 cash match, $3.6 in-kind contribution) SBA = $3.2 million ($2.4 request, $875,000 match)
    19. 19. The Journey to Engagement
    20. 20. Principles  Mutual benefit  Extension as facilitator  Community ownership  Public-private partnership  Advancement of innovation  Two-way flow of knowledge
    21. 21. Sustaining the Engagement  Organizational design  Communication  Shared vision  Shared results
    22. 22. WiscNet
    23. 23. CAN’s
    24. 24. Programming  Community Area Networks  How to lead together  Broadband use to improve quality of life & local economy
    25. 25. Development & Education  Broadband use webinars  Virtual Inventors & Entrepreneurs Club  Awareness/marketing campaign  Community broadband assessment tool  Community-based education  Best practices video case studies  Website
    26. 26. Awareness Campaign  Community-based  Statewide
    27. 27. Evaluation & Metrics  Phone survey/state broadband planning/mapping project  Broadband preparedness index  Qualitative case studies  Economic indicators
    28. 28. Your Role How many of you are engaged in building community capacity through broadband?
    29. 29. Thank you! Maria Alvarez-Stroud Project Manager Building Community Capacity through Broadband Office of Community Sustainability Univeristy of Wisconsin Extension maria.alvarez-stroud@uwex.edu 608-263-9295 Professor Andy Lewis Community and Economic Development Manager Building Community Capacity through Broadband Office of Community Sustainability 610 Langdon St. Madison, WI 53703 608-263-1432 andy.lewis@uwex.edu http://www.uwex.edu/ces/cced/andylewis.cfm
    30. 30. Thank you! John Pederson Educational Technology Liaison WiscNet - Wisconsin's Research and Education Network johnpederson@wiscnet.net 608-265-1126

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