Engaging The Board In Fundraising
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Engaging The Board In Fundraising

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Three part strategy in engaging your board in fundraising

Three part strategy in engaging your board in fundraising

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  • SAMPLE POLICY HANDOUT?

Engaging The Board In Fundraising Engaging The Board In Fundraising Presentation Transcript

  • Engaging Your Board in Fundraising The Center for Nonprofit Success Boston Fundraising Summit Boston, Massachusetts September 29 th , 2010
  • Workshop Facilitators
    • Clare McCully, Vice President of Development Newbury College
    • Terry O`Connor, Exec Director
    • Cardinal Shehan Center
    • Sondra Lintelmann-Dellaripa, Principal
    • Harvest Development Group
  • Syllabus One
    • Framing your Perspective
      • Partnership
      • What’s the point of having board involved?
      • Reasons Board Members resist
      • The Mirror
      • The Pillars
      • Defining Roles
    View slide
  • Syllabus Two
    • Planning and Measuring
      • Policy on Board Fundraising
      • Strategic Planning and engagement
      • Measurement tools
    View slide
  • Syllabus Three
    • Training and Communication
      • Access
      • Authority
      • Formal
      • Informal
    • Q&A: 15 minutes
  • Framing Your Perspective
    • Partnership
    • What’s the point of having board involved?
    • Reasons Board Members resist
    • The Mirror
    • The Pillars
    • Defining Roles
  • Partner OR Benevolent Dictator How do you see your Board ?
  • What’s the Point?
    • Responsibility, On Stage, Enlarge Network
    • Board role in Philanthropy
      • Board role is to govern and act as fiduciary authority for the protection of the organization and its stakeholders.
      • Impactful reason
    • Change the view
      • Not about asking for money
      • Is about making a meaningful and tangible impact
    • Trustworthiness important to Passion
      • Work for us
      • Work for you
    • Passion=Philanthropy
    • The rest comes naturally- that’s fundraising.
  • Reasons Board members don't fundraise
    • No education
    • Too overwhelming
    • Too embarrassing (no skill)
    • Not aware what they were signing up for
    • No money themselves
    • Fear of rejection
    • Or fear that they are asking too much of someone, something the other can't part with.
    • Lack of confidence in plan, process, person, organization
    • Disinterested
    • Most board issues are not about the board, but about us.
      • Lack of concrete goals, lack of clarity in board roles, hazy expected objectives/outcomes, poor organization of donors, poor research, lack of effective communication of organizational success…….
  • Preparing for success
    • THOUGHTFUL BOARD DEVELOPMENT
      • Thoughtful and Strategic Board Development creates valuable board fundraising partners
        • Known GAPS and NEEDS
        • Clear expectations
        • Specific Agreement
        • Ongoing Structure
    • CHAMPIONS
  • Defining Roles
    • Board Role
      • Be actively engaged
      • Identify VIP’s
      • Open Doors
      • Build friends
      • Advocacy
      • High level asks
      • Social Oppy’s
      • Thank you
    • Staff Role
      • Set direction
      • Oversee operations
      • Maintain contact with donors
      • Direct solicitation process
      • Develop opportunities for engagement
      • Provide resources
  • Planning and Measuring
    • Policy on Board Fundraising
    • Strategic Planning and Engagement
    • Measurement Tools
  • Policy on Board Fundraising Good policy: Sets expectations Frames work Supports objectives Provides direction Builds confidence Ensures general satisfaction Establishes continuity
  • Strategic Planning and Engagement * What is the right balance of restricted vs. unrestricted income? * Should you build an endowment and if so, how quickly? * How will your organization stay competitive and relevant to funders? * How dependent should you be on any single source of funding? * How much risk are you willing to accept? * How much growth would investment in different revenue strategies produce? * What is the role of membership in your revenue generating strategy? * What role does fee-for-service income play in your organization? * What kind of investment is necessary to achieve these objectives? Over what timeline? * What is the obligation of the Board in revenue generation? * How will the Board effectively monitor fundraising success?
  • Measurement Tools "Technological man can't believe in anything that can't be measured, taped, or put into a computer." ~Clare Booth Luce
    • Measure progress, not completion of goal
    • Define success in terms other than financial
    • Establish credible Benchmarks/Metric
    • Define accountability
    • Agree on Plan B
    • Review monthly
  • Training and Communication
    • Access and Authority
    • Formal and Informal
  • Access and Authority
    • Access to staff
    • Access to data and details on
    • organizations fiscal responsibility, program
    • outcomes and on philanthropic results
    • Access to information and research on
    • donors
    • Authorized voice in the planning process
    • Authorized to partner with program and
    • development officers
    • Authorized to speak/advocate on behalf of
    • the organization
  • Formal and Informal
    • Training
      • Specific training on philanthropy: donor cycle, translational relationships
      • Modeling behaviors
      • Mentoring
      • Inclusion in organizational annual training activity
    • Communication
      • Formal data reports
      • Formal program reports (stories)
      • Congenial informal relationships encouraged with all staff
      • Success broadcast
  • Questions