The big window, bbc & solutions 2 - changing the way we think about age

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The big window, bbc & solutions 2 - changing the way we think about age

  1. 1. Consumer andOrganisational Psychology It’s all in the mind: Changing the way we think about age David Bunker, BBC Lisa Edgar, The Big Window The Big Window Consultancy Limited www.the-big-window.co.uk l info@the-big-window.co.uk
  2. 2. Imagine… …so you decide…
  3. 3. …a pretty typical sample… Age Gender SEG/Wealth Behaviours
  4. 4. …though you wanted to keep it tight… Age 64years Gender Male/Female SEG/Wealth AB/affluent Behaviours Travels Eats out Domestic help
  5. 5. Mod All 64 (2012) Essential
  6. 6.  The female group not feeling any more cohesive!Mod All 64 (2012) Essential
  7. 7.  All of which challenges our thinking and use of chronological age  does it really bind us together? Jacob Rees Mogg Jack Black 43 years old in 2012 43 years old in 2012
  8. 8.  At a time when we really need to understand more about age  getting older 35% 30% 30% 28% 25% 22% 20% 2010 15% 2030 2050 10% 5% 0% 0-14 years 15-29 years 30-44 years 45-59 years 60+ years (ONS, 2010)  and living longer
  9. 9. Ultimately, we needed to understand how consumers saw themselves, not how we see them  perceived age
  10. 10. We approached the BBC and asked if they were interested too  they were
  11. 11.  Our challenges 1. develop a model and measures for perceived age 2. identify the key determinants of perceived age 3. predict consumer preferences and behaviours using perceived age 4. help organisations understand their consumers/audiences better and help them more accurately target and communicate with them ➔ the Age Frame
  12. 12. Developed a 10-item questionnaire Additional questions -disposition -situation -motivationPlaced on BBC ‘Pulse’ media panel (5th - 15th Dec, 2011) c3000 responses
  13. 13.  What we found was fascinating 3.6 2.6 1.3 Years 17.0 22.0 27.0 32.0 37.0 42.0 47.0 52.0 57.0 62.0 67.0 74.5 -0.9 -3.2 -4.2 -7.0 -9.0 -11.2 -12.5 -13.9 -16.5 I feel 58 years old
  14. 14.  After early 70s: the gap starts to narrow tAF© Age 70.0 60.0 Chronological age 50.0 Perceived age (tAF©) 40.0 30.0 20.0 10.0 0.0 17 22 27 32 37 42 47 52 57 62 67 75 Chronological age
  15. 15.  A predictive model for an overall perceived age construct  … and the factors that underpin it Overall the Age Frame© Construct ‘Internal AF ‘Interactive AF ‘External AF’ Age’ Age’ age
  16. 16. Engaged in Modern Life Mentally (> physically) stimulated PC/Internet Savvy Young at Heart Older at heart Confident Spontaneous  implications for social policy…?
  17. 17. More traditional Limited PC/Internet use Less engagedYoung at Heart Older at heart ‘Planners’ More cautious
  18. 18. Exciting potential  Sector-appropriate analysis  Brand-mapping  Marketing and communication development  Social policy  … now for the test
  19. 19. Perceived age – a real opportunity Big age study in November 2011 – published this year Reinforced that age on paper not the whole story Perceived Age has potential to explain actual consumption Serving all ages The views of the audience and experts Authors: Clarissa White, Gareth Morrell, Clare Luke and Penny Young (NatCen Social Research) with David Bunker (BBC) Date: 31/01/2012
  20. 20. Mapping out programmes and channels Older at heart Consumers are relatively ‘older at heart’ Age 20 Age 70Younger at heart Consumers are relatively ‘young at heart’
  21. 21. TVYounger at Older at heart heart channels
  22. 22. 30 50
  23. 23. 50 70
  24. 24. Perceived age adds another dimension Younger at heart of all ages drawn to lighter content – celebrity, fashion, talk shows, entertainment and comedy, music radio – but also arts and Radio 3! Older at heart of all ages drawn to more ‘substantial’ subjects – current and consumer affairs, religion, nature, speech radio – but also to quiz and leisure shows Presenters/treatments can cross boundaries – Who Do You Think You Are/Brian Cox
  25. 25. How could we use this insight? Many commercial and non commercial opportunities Some ideas BBC will be exploring:  More intelligent scheduling  More sympathetic trail/ad context  More intelligent targeting of new viewers/listeners And we plan to take it further:  Changes over time/changing circumstance?  National and international differences
  26. 26. ThanksLisa Edgar, 43years, going on 38yearsDavid Bunker, 48years, going on 39years

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