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Basic Personal Safety Concepts

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This PDF contains Basic Personal Safety Concepts.

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  • 1. A Research & Analysis Services Company
  • 2. RiskThe elements where a person has a certain level of control,such as social contacts, and how these elements may exposehim/her to unforeseen dangers.ThreatThe broader elements that affect a person and are beyondhis/her control; traveling, business position, politics, theweather, etc. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 4
  • 3. Categories of Risks/Threats Against a Person’s Safety / Security Against a Person’s immediate Family Against a Person’s psychological well-being Against a Person’s Privacy Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 5
  • 4.  Wealth Social Status Celebrity / Public Exposure Political Views Symbolic Status Personal / Business Travel Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 6
  • 5. Types of Threats Verbal Assault Physical Assault Use of Blunt Objects Edged Weapons Firearms Explosives Kidnapping Severe Weather Natural Disasters Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 7
  • 6. Types of Potential Attackers The Deranged Individual Former Intimate Stalker Unknown Stalker Disgruntled Employees / Co-Workers Personal Vendetta / Revenge Criminals Professional Assassins / Contract Killers Terrorists Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 8
  • 7. Types of Health Risks Heart Problems Allergic Reactions Diabetes Previous Injuries Communicable Diseases Previous Surgeries Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 9
  • 8. Types of Personal Risks/Threats Sexual Encounters Association with known criminals Excessive Drinking Drug Use Financial Problems Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 10
  • 9. Daily Transit ActivityWhen you are in transit, from Point A to Point B, youautomatically have less control over the environment and are open to many Risks and Threats. You must learn to keep a Mental Snapshot of your Surroundings throughout your day. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 12
  • 10. ExerciseDraw a map from Point A to Point B identified by the course Instructor.What Risks or Threats can you identify along the route that you took? Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 13
  • 11. Situational Awareness Being Aware of your environment and of any Potential or Real Risks or Threats that might be present is the first and most important key of Personal Safety and Security. You should apply the Concepts while at Home, Work, School, In Transit, etc. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 15
  • 12. Situational Awareness Being Aware of your Surroundings will help you Avoid hostile actions and violent confrontations. Do you have a Safety and Security Plan to address any Potential or Real Risks or Threats you might face? Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 16
  • 13. Situational Awareness It is always better to EVADE any hostile and dangerous situation by any means possible.There is nothing wrong with running from a Risk or Threat if possible. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 17
  • 14. 4 Levels of Personal Safety UNAWARE A State of Mind in which you are not Alert to your immediate surroundings. This would include while you sleep, watch TV, cook a meal, being at home, etc. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 18
  • 15. 4 Levels of Personal Safety Aware The State of Mind in which you are Aware of your environment. At this level, you have not yet identified any Potential or Real Risk or Threat that may be present. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 19
  • 16. 4 Levels of Personal Safety AwareAwareness involves the use of your Five Senses: Sight Sound Smell Touch Taste Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 20
  • 17. 4 Levels of Personal SafetyDuring conditions where a Potential or Real Risk orThreat is Present, you should avoid using items that willimpair your Vision and Sound.Example: Avoid using headphones while jogging orwalking, especially at Night and Alone. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 21
  • 18. 4 Levels of Personal Safety Alert In this State of Mind, you have identified a Potential or Real Risk or Threat within your environment. Your spider sense is going nuts… Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 22
  • 19. 4 Levels of Personal Safety Alert General RuleAny person not known to you or your family can constitute a Potential or Real Risk or Threat. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 23
  • 20. 4 Levels of Personal Safety Alarm In this State of Mind, the Potential Risk or Threat has now become a Real and your Personal Safety and Security has been compromised. A high level of FEAR and ANXIETY takes over. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 24
  • 21. Alarm Alert Aware UnawareCopyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 25
  • 22. The Defensive MindsetThe values, mental techniques, and attitude thatmaximizes the effectiveness of how you respond to a Risk or Threat. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 26
  • 23. Defensive Mindset Concepts Ability to Defend Do you have the ability and willingness to defend yourself and not become a VICTIM?Be wary of self-defense instructors that claim they can train to defend yourself…their systems are untested and are more for sport. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 27
  • 24. Defensive Mindset Concepts Ability to DefendThe State of Texas’ new Self-Defense Castle Doctrine Statute effective September 1, 2007. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 28
  • 25. Defensive Mindset Concepts Never Give UpA person becomes a VICTIM because he / she gives up and is overpowered by the Offender. You must be determined to persevere by all means necessary and never give up. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 29
  • 26. Defensive Mindset Concepts Develop A Plan Planning is an important component of Personal Survival. Are you laying the foundation to be Victimized? Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 30
  • 27. Defensive Mindset Concepts Develop A PlanA Plan is a Pre-Determined Course of Action used to respond to specific situations you might encounter.A Threat Assessment and Risk Analysis complement your Personal Safety and Security Plan. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 31
  • 28. Defensive Mindset Concepts2 Steps To Take After Identifying A Potential Or Real Risk or Threat:1. Formulate a Hypothetical Plan of Action to deal with the Risk or Threat.2. Establish Barriers that will initiate your Plan of Action. An Aggressive Gesture, entering your Personal Space, etc. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 32
  • 29. Defensive Mindset Concepts Situational VisualizationThis is the formation of a mental image for handling different Situations.It is also a major component of Developing A Plan. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 33
  • 30. Defensive Mindset Concepts RememberPanic = Victimization Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 34
  • 31. Fear Fear is good…it is your body telling you that you are in some type of Danger. If Fear becomes paralyzing, it can’t help you fight harder or run faster. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 36
  • 32. Fear Fear = Release of Adrenaline into the bloodstream. Adrenaline dictates the Fight or Flight Concept. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 37
  • 33. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear1. TachypsychiaThe perception from people under stress that describes time moving in slow motion. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 38
  • 34. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear1. TachypsychiaThe brain is processing very quickly to allow for a faster defensive response.This is a positive side effect that can enhance defensive abilities. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 39
  • 35. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear2. Auditory Exclusion The brain’s ability to block sound while focused on a Threat. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 40
  • 36. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear2. Auditory Exclusion The brain blocks auditory input to allow you to focus completely on the Threat. This has both a positive and negative effects. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 41
  • 37. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear2. Auditory Exclusion You get an increased ability to focus (positive) while it also keeps you from noticing or hearing other potential risks or threats coming at you (negative). Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 42
  • 38. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear3. Tunnel VisionThis is the narrowing of your field of vision as you focus on a particular Risk or Threat. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 43
  • 39. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear3. Tunnel Vision You loose peripheral vision, which prevents you from identifying other Risks or Threats that may be approaching you from your left or right. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 44
  • 40. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear3. Tunnel VisionTo avoid Tunnel Vision, SCAN the immediate area Left and Right after engaging a Risk or Threat. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 45
  • 41. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear4. Cognitive Dissonance This is a Disassociation with the actual events as they occur. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 46
  • 42. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear4. Cognitive DissonanceA Disassociated Mind is the most dangerous reaction to Fear because it is rejecting the idea that something terrible is happening. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 47
  • 43. 4 Types of Reactions to Fear4. Cognitive DissonanceWhen this happens, the Victim is negating the ability to effectively fight back or retreat. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 48
  • 44. The “6 P’s Principle”Proper Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 50
  • 45. Victimization / Targeting
  • 46. Victimization / Targeting 3 Elements of a Potential Criminal Act1. DesireThe criminal (s) must have a desire and / or motivation tojustify the actions or receive some type of tangible /intangible benefit from the criminal act. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 52
  • 47. Victimization / Targeting 3 Elements of a Potential Criminal Act2. AbilityThe criminal (s) need to recognize his ability, physicalskills, knowledge, available assets, etc. to commit thecriminal act. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 53
  • 48. Victimization / Targeting 3 Elements of a Potential Criminal Act3. OpportunityThe criminal (s) selects his target based on vulnerabilityand accessibility. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 54
  • 49. 3 Elements of a Potential Criminal Act Desire Ability Opportunity Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 55
  • 50. Victimization / Targeting 3 Elements of a Potential Victim1. SuitabilityAre you a Suitable Target?Would coming after you further the criminal’s Goals,Desires, or Motivations?What do you possess that the criminal wants? Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 56
  • 51. Victimization / Targeting 3 Elements of a Potential Victim2. VulnerabilityWhat type of security measures do you have in place toprotect yourself and your family? Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 57
  • 52. Victimization / Targeting 3 Elements of a Potential Victim2. Vulnerability Personal Behaviors Physical Security (Alarms, Lights, Fences) Information Security (Denying Access) Computer Security (Passwords, Locks) Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 58
  • 53. Victimization / Targeting 3 Elements of a Potential Victim2. Vulnerability Some Vulnerabilities can be very obvious and can be detected without much effort. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 59
  • 54. Victimization / Targeting 3 Elements of a Potential Victim2. Vulnerability A measure of your Attractiveness to a criminal or terrorist. What are your Vulnerabilities? Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 60
  • 55. Victimization / Targeting 3 Elements of a Potential Victim3. Probability of SuccessWhat is the probability that if the criminal comes after you,he will be successful?Keep in mind that by the time the criminal comes after you,he has already studied you and determined the Risks andThreats to himself. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 61
  • 56. 3 Elements of a Potential Victim Suitability Vulnerability Success Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 62
  • 57. Victimization / Targeting Victim Selection + Victim Behavior = VICTIMIZATION Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 63
  • 58. Observation Skills The eyes provide the visual information, which is sent to the brain for processing, and causes a person to respond to a particular situation. Since you were a child, you have been trained using your eyes. You need to further develop this skill. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 65
  • 59. Observation Skills Your eyes are trained to SCAN an area within your sight from LEFT to RIGHT. This is the skill you use to read a book. You are also trained to SCAN an area within your sight from LEFT to RIGHT to LEFT. This is the skill you use when driving a vehicle. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 66
  • 60. Observation Skills By SCANNING Left / Right / Left, the retention of what you observe increases,and gives you a better picture of what you have seen. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 67
  • 61. Observation SkillsSCANNING and GLANCING at something or someone that has caught your attention are a more relaxing and effective ways of observation. Do not stare because this action tires your eyes and causes your vision to become unclear and fuzzy. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 68
  • 62. Observation SkillsOne day, you might get the feeling or intuition that you are being followed by another vehicle.This is your mind warning you of a Potential or Real Risk or Threat. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 69
  • 63. Observation Skills Surveillance Indicators Multiple sightings of same suspicious individuals , a vehicle, or other activity separated by: Date  Time  Location Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 70
  • 64. Observation Skills Surveillance IndicatorsTEDDTimeEnvironmentDistanceDeportment Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 71
  • 65. Observation Skills What To Look For: A vehicle that slows down when you slow down, but keeps its distance. A vehicle that does not pass you; this goes beyond driving behavior. A vehicle that turns a corner when you do. A vehicle that stops at a distance when you stop at your destination. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 72
  • 66. Observation Skills How To Respond: Pull your vehicle over and try to get a license plate. Keep driving but do not go directly to your destination; go somewhere else. Request police assistance. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 73
  • 67. Auditory SkillsThe most important rule for maximizing your Hearing accuracy is: Breathing Control Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 74
  • 68. Auditory Skills During a dangerous situation, the pace of your Breathing increases, and so does your Heart Rate.Take deep, slow breaths to control your heart rate and increase your Auditory Skills. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 75
  • 69. Smelling SkillsYou are programmed to React to scents that are pleasing or unpleasant.A particular odor will trigger your sensory memories that will correspond to your past events. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 76
  • 70. Smelling SkillsTo improve your sense of smell, practice these steps: Close your eyes Take a deep breath Let your mind instead of your eyes determine the scent Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 77
  • 71. Basic Criminal Warning Signs A person intent on committing a Crime will put on a “FALSE FACE”. The criminal’s intent is to deceive the Target (Victim). Everything that the criminal says and does will most likely be LIES. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 79
  • 72. Basic Criminal Warning SignsThe criminal will be extremely Charming and Friendly. Alert: These behaviors are Warning Signs. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 80
  • 73. The Victimization Process1. Pre-Victimization At this point, the criminal will be searching for his Victim. This victim selection process is called “TROLLING”. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 82
  • 74. The Victimization Process1. Pre-Victimization The criminal will Troll for his Targets at: Malls Colleges / Universities Nightclubs Grocery Stores Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 83
  • 75. The Victimization Process2. Initial ContactOnce the criminal selects a Target, he will do all he can to initiate contact. At this point, the selected Target is unaware about the Initial Contact’s intentions. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 84
  • 76. The Victimization Process2. Initial ContactThe criminal will attempt to make contact with his target in some manner. The criminal will get close enough to begin a conversation with the Target. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 85
  • 77. The Victimization Process2. Initial Contact The Initial Contact is to lower the selected Victim’s defenses.The conversation will be prepped in order to take control of the situation. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 86
  • 78. The Victimization Process2. Initial Contact The Initial Contact can be made days or weeks before the Target becomes a Victim. The Initial Contact is part of the victim selection process. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 87
  • 79. The Victimization Process2. Initial Contact The Initial Contact is to commit the Target into some type of obligation and to gain trust.The criminal might do a favor or task in which the Target becomes in Debt to him. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 88
  • 80. The Victimization Process2. Initial Contact The favor might be one that is ongoing and one that makes the Target accompany the criminal into a more private and secluded location. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 89
  • 81. The Victimization Process3. Follow-Up Contact The criminal sets-up the situation in which the Target runs into him to do a follow-up contact.By this point, the criminal has already studied his Target and has decided to Victimized the Target. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 90
  • 82. The Victimization Process4. Target Isolation The objective now is to Isolate the Target.If the criminal has previously gained the trust, it will be easier to Isolate the Target from other people. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 91
  • 83. The Victimization Process4. Target Isolation The Target must be prepared to refuse to be alone with the criminal. Ask yourself…Why should I go alone with this person? Be Inquisitive. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 92
  • 84. The Victimization Process5. Target Victimization Once the Target is completely Isolated, the criminal will attack. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 93
  • 85. The Victimization Process6. Post-VictimizationOnce the criminal completes the attack, he has to decide whether to release or kill the Victim. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 94
  • 86. The Victimization Process6. Post-Victimization More likely, the Victim will be killed. The criminal will then attempt to cover up the crime by destroying evidence and disposing of the Victim’s body. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 95
  • 87. The Victimization Process6. Post-Victimization The criminal will then depart the crime scene without being seen. Keep in mind that the seasoned, career criminal has more experience and Situational Awareness that a beginner and Victims. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 96
  • 88. The Victimization Process AlertThe criminal will make his movewhen it is most convenient to himand the Target is most Vulnerable. Copyright (c) 2011. SOA. All Rights Reserved. 97
  • 89. Sergio Olivares, MPA President & General Manager (361) 694 - 2385research_and_analysis@yahoo.com