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Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons
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Educational Fair Use And Creative Commons

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  • 1. Educational Fair Use and Creative Commons
  • 2. Fair Use <ul><li>Fair use is the limited property rights given to creators in order to support their production of culture related products. At the same time other creators are given the right to use the same material without having to ask for permission or submit payment. The allowance of creators to use the work of others to enhance their creations permits the growth of cultural work on our society. </li></ul>
  • 3. Educational Fair Use <ul><li>Educational Fair Use is the opportunity for educators to be open about the use of copy righted material. In any case that the use of material is challenged, the Fair Use doctrine would be considered since the material being used is under an educational setting. </li></ul>
  • 4. EMPLOYING COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL IN MEDIA LITERACY LESSONS <ul><li>The use of media literacy in lessons is commonly used to provide a real world connection to lessons and activities in the classroom. By using outside resources such as newspapers, magazines, and websites teachers are providing students with ways to enhance their critical thinking skills. By using such resources students can analyze information and dissect the material by way of Blooms taxonomy style learning. Analysis, demonstration, and evaluation are just some ways that media literacy lessons can enhance learning for students. They are given learning opportunities that extend beyond the common classroom lesson. Teachers, using only the amount of material they need whether it be an excerpt or a whole resource, can take opportunities to teacher how to properly cite work where credit is due. </li></ul><ul><li>Five Principles </li></ul>
  • 5. EMPLOYING COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL IN PREPARING CURRICULUM MATERIALS <ul><li>Using copyrighted material in books, workbooks, websites etc. The copyrighted material is essentially used to create lesson plans, tool kits and other things that would be used to prepare the curriculum for enhancing student learning. Educators should provide credit wherever possible and only use what ever is necessary of the copyrighted work. If the need a clip of something then the should use just that instead of the whole thing. </li></ul>
  • 6. SHARING MEDIA LITERACY CURRICULUM MATERIALS <ul><li>This allows for teachers to share copyrighted material with each other in cases such as lessons, professional development and presentations. If the creator is making sound decisions in their creation then it should be acceptable to share in the education setting. Anything used by education professional to promote anything personal is unacceptable in this case. They should also consider what they sharing and they should ensure its use is purposeful when related to education. </li></ul>
  • 7. STUDENT USE OF COPYRIGHTED MATERIALS IN THEIR OWN ACADEMIC AND CREATIVE WORK <ul><li>This is the opportunity for students to use various forms of copyrighted material such as images, sounds, music and video to enhance creativity and critical thinking. They are encouraged to express the meaning of their work and share it with others. Ideally this will stimulate discussions and collaboration amongst students. </li></ul>
  • 8. DEVELOPING AUDIENCES FOR STUDENT WORK <ul><li>This goes beyond collaboration for students when creating their work. They are expected to incorporate copyrighted material into a production specific for an audience. In such cases the requirement could be for the student to distribute their work. Students and educators work together in order to determine what is appropriate for distribution. If the student work uses material that has been adapted or represented again in another for it is considered fair use and can be distributed in an educational setting. </li></ul>
  • 9. Creative Commons <ul><li>Creative Commons (CC) is a non profit organization that provides you with a public space for legal sharing. Whenever anything is created all rights are reserved. Creative commons allows you to share it online and select the amount of restrictions you want. The Creative Commons licenses exist to work alongside copyright laws. They are not an alternative so they can be modified to the terms that best suit your needs. </li></ul>
  • 10. Creative Commons Licenses <ul><li>Attribution </li></ul><ul><li>You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request. </li></ul><ul><li>Share Alike </li></ul><ul><li>You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work. </li></ul><ul><li>Non-Commercial </li></ul><ul><li>You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for non-commercial purposes only. </li></ul><ul><li>No Derivative Works </li></ul><ul><li>You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it. </li></ul>
  • 11. FlickR <ul><li>FlickR is a site that is combined with Creative Commons to allow users to run an advanced search for images or video. Users can click on the cc option to search FlickR for things without having to deal with the issues of educational fair use. </li></ul><ul><li>FlickR also provides users a way to organize and share photos and video online. </li></ul>
  • 12. References <ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://creativecommons.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://online.education.ufl.edu/file.php/3764/05DigitalCitizen/CodeofBestPracticesinFairUse.pdf </li></ul>

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