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The Architecture of Social Websites: Reputation
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The Architecture of Social Websites: Reputation

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The Reputation-specific slides from our IA Summit 2009 Workshop, The Architecture of Social Websites. Workshop given by Christina Wodtke, Joshua Porter, Christian Crumlish, and myself Bryce Glass.

The Reputation-specific slides from our IA Summit 2009 Workshop, The Architecture of Social Websites. Workshop given by Christina Wodtke, Joshua Porter, Christian Crumlish, and myself Bryce Glass.

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The Architecture of Social Websites: Reputation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Reputation Bryce Glass
  • 2. Reputation is… Information used to make a value judgment about an object or person …
  • 3. … or an animal. What do you think of this guy?
  • 4. “ Reputation is another potential source of information about an opponent's fighting ability . Reputation is defined here as the estimation held by one individual of another individual's qualities or characteristics . Reputation is thus a property of one animal in relation to another. One animal's reputation may be learned by another through personal experience with it, or secondhand, through the experiences of others .” — Deception, Perspectives on Human and Nonhuman Deceit By Robert W. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson Photo: “ Scars ” by Imansyah™ used under Creative Commons license .
  • 5. Reputation is… Information used to make a value judgment about an object or person within a context for a period of time .
  • 6. Reputation is… Information used to make a value judgment about an object or person within a context for a period of time . What kinds of information? Where does this information come from ?
  • 7. Reputation is… Information used to make a value judgment about an object or person within a context for a period of time . What kinds of value judgments can we make?
  • 8. Reputation is… Information used to make a value judgment about an object or person within a context for a period of time . We call these reputable entities . Reputable entities may be people on your site, or they may be the objects & artifacts that they interact with. What qualities do good reputable entities possess? Is people reputation ( karma ) demonstrably different than content reputation ?
  • 9. Reputation is… Information used to make a value judgment about an object or person within a context for a period of time . Can one reputation serve all contexts ? Global vs. local reputations Choosing the right scope . Is reputation portable ? Can I “carry” it from context to context?
  • 10. Reputation is… Information used to make a value judgment about an object or person within a context for a period of time . Nothing lasts forever. Reputations should decay . Use time-based filters for reputation-ranked content.
  • 11. Now we’re gonna jump around a bit.
  • 12. Reputable Entity (RE)
    • The objects or people within your system capable of accruing reputation.
  • 13. REs are…
    • Up to you to define
    • Things with some persistent value
      • They should stick around long enough for work done by the community to benefit others.
  • 14. RE as Person Reputation extends one’s identity… … esp. when said identity is weak Metadata is reputation Gathered from Ratings Associations & Affiliations are also reputation Rep can be displayed as a score
  • 15. RE as Object Objects frequently come from people . Statistical Evidence Volume of response Community Ratings
  • 16. Lighting Round: Identify the RE
    • 7 different web screens.
    • These all use reputation-type methods for enhancing the user experience.
    • Yell out the primary reputable entities on these sites. They might be people, or objects, or both.
  • 17.  
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  • 24. Different Strokes
    • Display reputation at all?
      • Flickr doesn’t
      • Y! Local does
    • To rank, or not to rank.
        • Again, Flickr doesn’t
        • Y! Answers does, in a leaderboard
        • Digg numbers, but doesn’t rank strictly according to # of Diggs.
  • 25. Different Strokes, cont.
    • Which display pattern to use?
    • For content:
      • Related to the input methods used to determine an objects score. (eg. If you’re collecting Star Ratings, then show Avg Star Rating back.)
    • For people:
      • Related to the context, the community, and other considerations.
  • 26. How about you?
    • Did you come here today with a reputation-based system in mind?
    • Care to share? What are the Reputable Entities you’re tracking and why did you choose those ones?
  • 27. How to choose?
    • Work backwards, from the types of value judgments users might make on your site.
  • 28. Do users want to…
    • … compare and contrast the quality of objects on your site?
    • … determine whether a piece of information is true or false?
    • …  determine the credibility of an author of an article?
  • 29. A user might ask…
    • “ Is this video worth my time? Should I watch it?”
    • “ What’s the best mid-size sedan in this price-range?”
  • 30. Choosing, cont.
    • Keep reputations for entities only when it makes sense to do so.
    • Only when it can be presented back to the user in a way that aids them in making these judgments.
  • 31. Good Decision
    • YouTube keeps numerous reputation-types, all derived from diff combinations of various inputs. These help users compare video quality/interest across several different axes.
  • 32. Bad Decision
    • Orkut allowed people to explicitly rate other users on iconic dimensions like trusty , cool , and sexy for no utility other than display. This caused all kinds of social backlash.
  • 33. Reputation is… Information used to make a value judgment about an object or person within a context for a period of time . What kinds of information? Where does this information come from? How do we experience it ?
  • 34.
    • A quick overview of how reputation systems work…
    Where does this information come from?
  • 35. The classic love triangle…
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  • 47. Sally has found her Bits.
  • 48. Bob is rewarded for his Bits.
  • 49. And, yes, Sally admires Bob.
  • 50.
    • Gathered by monitoring events that occur on (or off) your site.
    Where does this information come from?
  • 51.
    • The fundamental building block of any reputation system.
    The Reputation Statement
  • 52.  
  • 53. Individual statements combine to form aggregate or community scores
  • 54. What are the Targets? Claims?
  • 55.
    • Explicit: Someone makes a statement about the quality of something
    • Implicit: Someone acts on something, so we infer value from that.
    2 Kinds of Reputation Statement
  • 56. Explicit
  • 57. Implicit
  • 58. Lighting Round: Explicit or Implicit
    • Some of the examples from before
    • I’ve marked some possible reputation inputs ( events that generate reputation statements .)
    • For each input: is it an explicit statement? Or an implicit one?
  • 59.  
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  • 62.
    • Each method has value.
    • You can use them in combination.
    • Explicit invites gaming, tho’ neither method defends against it.
    Use both
  • 63.
    • To give a variety of means for participation
      • Vote, poll, ‘Buzz’, Rate
    • You want explicit DISPLAY
      • Show a score or Avg. Rating
      • To enable comparisons, leaderboards
    Go ‘Explicit’ when…
  • 64. Reputation is… Information used to make a value judgment about an object or person within a context for a period of time . What kinds of value judgments? Who’s doing the judging? How are these judgments expressed ?
  • 65. Reputation can help your users decide…
    • “ Is this video worth my time?”
    • “ Who are the people on this site that I should pay attention to?”
    • “ Who’s most helpful here?”
      • Funniest?
      • A good conversation-starter?
  • 66. But not always in the ways you think!
  • 67. Consider instead…
  • 68. Or…
  • 69.
    • For your project, you’ve already identified the users & drafted some designs to represent their Identities . Furthermore, you’ve thought about the Social Objects that they’re likely to generate, and the types of activities that those objects will support…
    Exercise 3
  • 70.
    • Now, let’s identify the types of reputations that would be most useful
    • Identify which entities on your site (people and objects) should be reputable ones
    • Discuss what types of reputations you’d like to keep for each
    • List a number of Inputs, or actions that—when taken—will produce Reputation Statements.
    Exercise 3, cont.