“Biochar-Infused” Soil AggregatesPhoto by Dr. Saran                                Melissa K. EricksonPaul Sohi, UKBRC    ...
Carbon-Poor Soil vs. Native Carbon-Rich Soil                     Nutrient-Poor         Oxisol Amended                     ...
Background: Charcoal Amended Soils Around                 the World                     Orissa,                      India...
Why Amend Soil with Charcoal?    -Increased seed germination (~30% enhancement)    -Increased plant growth (~24% greater s...
Advantages of Bio-char in SoilEnhances Soil Biologically, Chemically and Physically    1. Prevents leaching of nutrients o...
Advantages of Bio-char Amendment - ContinuedAnimal Feed   1. Provides additional minerals   2. Helps maintain a healthy di...
Advantages of Natural Charcoal AmendmentResearchers at Iowa State investigating using charcoal and bio-  oil to produce a ...
Types of Charcoal and Soil AnalyzedResearch Approaches:1. Charcoal: SAFFE, B.C. 550°C (500 grams), Lots 11 and 122. Soil t...
Wooster Soils Amended with Charcoal              (wet/dry cycle-formed, 30% Charcoal shown)1. Added mixtures of ground soi...
Wooster Soils Amended with Charcoal                 (Molded, Conventional Till Soil as shown)1. Added mixtures of powdered...
Soil aggregate Stability by Two methodsDisplay of soil aggregatescontaining 30% charcoal;constructed after 10wetting/dryin...
Farming that Improves the EnvironmentRobert C. Brown, Iowa State’s Bergles Professor in Thermal Science is also studying c...
Current Studies of Charcoal Effectiveness                    as an Organic Fertilizer                      Growth and Harv...
Carbon Respiration Sample Preparation Method1. Convert vacuum tube into micro-   respirometer. Place glass wool in   the b...
Carbon Respiration Sample Evaluation Method1. Using a 1 ml syringe, pull the plunger past the 0.5 ml mark, then push   ful...
Carbon Respiration Sample Evaluation Method5. After completing the test run, flush each sample tube with dry CO 2 free   c...
Carbon Dioxide Respiration Results
Carbon Dioxide Respiration Results, Continued
Carbon Dioxide Respiration Results, Continued
Aggregate Stability ConclusionsThe Wooster Silt Loam soil from the Conventional Tillage (CT) areassampled exhibited a fine...
CO2 Respiration ConclusionsFor 10% to 90% charcoal/soil aggregates, no significant variation in CO 2respiration was observ...
AcknowledgementsThe researcher is very grateful for the cooperation and interest of Dr. Alvin Smuckerand the Soil Biophysi...
ReferencesCosentino, Diego Julian. (2006). “Organic matter contribution to aggregate stability in silty loamcultivated soi...
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"Biochar Infused" Soil Aggregates

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"Biochar Infused" Soil Aggregates

  1. 1. “Biochar-Infused” Soil AggregatesPhoto by Dr. Saran Melissa K. EricksonPaul Sohi, UKBRC Michigan State University
  2. 2. Carbon-Poor Soil vs. Native Carbon-Rich Soil Nutrient-Poor Oxisol Amended Oxisol Into Terra PretaPhoto courtesy of Bruno Glaser, 2000
  3. 3. Background: Charcoal Amended Soils Around the World Orissa, India Hokkaido, Japan Uganda, AfricaPhotos by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy
  4. 4. Why Amend Soil with Charcoal? -Increased seed germination (~30% enhancement) -Increased plant growth (~24% greater shoot height) -Greater crop yieldsNorman (1979)ZechUNCCD.pdf, published by Dr. Bruno Glaser
  5. 5. Advantages of Bio-char in SoilEnhances Soil Biologically, Chemically and Physically 1. Prevents leaching of nutrients out of soil 2. Increases available nutrients for plant growth 3. Increases water retention 4. Reduces the amount of fertilizer required 5. Decreases N2O, CH4 and other greenhouse gas emissions from the soil
  6. 6. Advantages of Bio-char Amendment - ContinuedAnimal Feed 1. Provides additional minerals 2. Helps maintain a healthy digestive system 3. Reduces animal methane production 4. Reduces odor and ammonia emissions from manure slurry
  7. 7. Advantages of Natural Charcoal AmendmentResearchers at Iowa State investigating using charcoal and bio- oil to produce a charcoal/anhydrous ammonia fertilizer. They expect three significant results from their studies:1. Farmers producing their own renewable energy to manufacture fertilizer for their fields.2. Farming that improves soils because the added charcoal to promote soil organisms.3. The charcoal sequestering carbon in the soil, thus reducing the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is estimated a 640-acre farm could retain the equivalent of 1,800 tons of carbon dioxide in the soil. Thats the annual emissions created by about 340 cars.
  8. 8. Types of Charcoal and Soil AnalyzedResearch Approaches:1. Charcoal: SAFFE, B.C. 550°C (500 grams), Lots 11 and 122. Soil texture: Wooster silt loam (fine-loamy, well-drained, mesic Typic Fragiudalf).3. Soil aggregates were sampled at depths of 0 to 5 cm from fields subjected to conventional till (CT), no till (NT), and native forest (NF) ecosystems of a Wooster silt loam using the following aggregate sizes: NF (Native Forest): 1.0 – 5cm, > 9.5mm NT (No Till): 0 – 5cm, > 9.5mm CT (Conventional Till): 0 – 5cm, > 9.5mm
  9. 9. Wooster Soils Amended with Charcoal (wet/dry cycle-formed, 30% Charcoal shown)1. Added mixtures of ground soil and 30% charcoal by weight.2. Filled sample cups with mixture and added six ml of water to 57mm aluminum dish.3. Hydrated sample mixtures with water for 48 hours.4. Removed water from samples and air dried for 24 hours.5. Repeated steps two through four nine more times, for a total of ten cycles.6. Inspected aggregate for structural Creation of aggregates from NF, integrity. NT and CT treatments mixed with 30% charcoal.
  10. 10. Wooster Soils Amended with Charcoal (Molded, Conventional Till Soil as shown)1. Added mixtures of powdered soil and 0%, 10%, 30%, 50%, 90%, and 100% charcoal by weight.2. Added distilled water to create a slurry.3. Filled molds with slurry from each percent sample through holes in the top.4. Dried in 60ο oven for 48 hours.5. Removed from molds and stored in petri dish till used. Molded synthetic aggregates from CT treatments mixed with 0%, 10%, 30%, 50%, 90%, and 100% charcoal using a rubber candy mold.
  11. 11. Soil aggregate Stability by Two methodsDisplay of soil aggregatescontaining 30% charcoal;constructed after 10wetting/drying cycles.Synthetic aggregatesconstructed by wetting anddrying cycles (right) andmolded samples (left).
  12. 12. Farming that Improves the EnvironmentRobert C. Brown, Iowa State’s Bergles Professor in Thermal Science is also studying charcoal amendment of soils with the aim of implementing farming practices that actually improve the environment through responsible, sustainable soil amendment techniques. In his words:“The conventional goal of good land stewardship is to minimize soil degradation and the amount of carbon released from the soil.”“This new approach to agriculture has the goal of actually improving soils.” Source: http://www.buyactivatedcharcoal.om/natural_fertilizer“In other words, producing and applying bio-char to soil would not only dramatically improve the soil and increase crop production, but also could provide a novel approach to establishing a significant, long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide” Johannes Lehman, in “Muck and Mystery: Bio-Char” website
  13. 13. Current Studies of Charcoal Effectiveness as an Organic Fertilizer Growth and Harvest of Soybeans Areas not using Areas using Areas Using Fertilizer nor Charcoal for ChemicalITEM Charcoal Compost fertilizerNo. of leaves 64 139 71Avg. Leaf Length cm 5.76 7.68 6.04Avg. of Leaf Width cm 3.25 4.08 3.26Germination Rate (%) 80 90 85Root Length cm 22 24 25.5Stem Length cm 14.66 17.19 18.23Stem Diameter cm 1.2 1.35 1.33No. of Seeds 26 89 37Weight of 100 Seeds g 28.1 44.25 33.85 Utilization Experiment of Charcoal Tested in Indonesia Data Provided by the Japanese Forestry Agency
  14. 14. Carbon Respiration Sample Preparation Method1. Convert vacuum tube into micro- respirometer. Place glass wool in the bottom, then the aggregate, and seal with the top with septum.2. Add 12% distilled water to each vial being analyzed, using a syringe.3. Equilibrate water within soil aggregate sample.4. Flush respirometer with CO2 free air.5. Maintain constant temperature during CO2 analysis of sample. Micro-respirometer chamber with soil aggregate.
  15. 15. Carbon Respiration Sample Evaluation Method1. Using a 1 ml syringe, pull the plunger past the 0.5 ml mark, then push fully forward. Repeat this process at least two more times, to ensure the syringe is completely evacuated.2. Insert needle through rubber septum of respirometer containing aggregate sample. Gently pull the plunger back past the 1.0 ml mark, then push forward to extract exactly 1.0 ml of gas in sample tube.3. In a slow, smooth motion, inject the full 1.0 ml sample into the injection port of the Infrared Gas Analyzer (IRGA).4. The IRGA results are correlated to CO2 gas standards with accuracies of 1 microgram (µg). Repeat steps 1 through 3 for each sample to be evaluated.
  16. 16. Carbon Respiration Sample Evaluation Method5. After completing the test run, flush each sample tube with dry CO 2 free compressed air.6. Incubate samples at 23 C for the time determined in the sampling schedule. Repeat steps 1 through 5 at each sample interval. Sample flushing manifold IRGA Setup
  17. 17. Carbon Dioxide Respiration Results
  18. 18. Carbon Dioxide Respiration Results, Continued
  19. 19. Carbon Dioxide Respiration Results, Continued
  20. 20. Aggregate Stability ConclusionsThe Wooster Silt Loam soil from the Conventional Tillage (CT) areassampled exhibited a finer soil aggregate structure, compared to thecompaction seen in Native Forest (NF) and No-Till (NT) soil samples.The finer CT soil structure allowed for greater penetration of theintroduced charcoal into the soil matrix than was observed with the NFand NT soils.The charcoal added to the soil matrix increased aggregate stability andimproved erosion resistance.
  21. 21. CO2 Respiration ConclusionsFor 10% to 90% charcoal/soil aggregates, no significant variation in CO 2respiration was observed for the first 24 hours of respiration datacollection, regardless of charcoal content or aggregate formation method.For 10%, 30% and 50% charcoal/soil aggregates, molded sample CO 2respiration after 48 hours exceeded that of the wet/dry cycle-formedaggregates.For pure charcoal aggregates in the same time frame, and 90%charcoal/soil aggregates after 144 hours, wet/dry cycle-formed CO 2respiration rate exceeded that of the molded samples.It was observed that molded aggregates exhibited a more compactnature, while wet/dry cycle-formed aggregates were looser and moreporous at all charcoal concentrations.
  22. 22. AcknowledgementsThe researcher is very grateful for the cooperation and interest of Dr. Alvin Smuckerand the Soil Biophysics Laboratory, who supported and guided this study.This research was supported and funded by Michigan State University College ofAgriculture and Natural Resources Undergraduate Research program.The researcher wishes to thank her committee; Professor Alvin Smucker, ProfessorKaren Renner, and Professor Sasha Kravchenko, and also her colleague and peer,Hyen Chun, for their many hours of review and suggestions to the report andpresentation.
  23. 23. ReferencesCosentino, Diego Julian. (2006). “Organic matter contribution to aggregate stability in silty loamcultivated soils. carbon input effects,” PhD thesis Matières organiques du sol, AgroParistech2006INAP0041 p.186.Cosentino, D., Claire Chenu, C., and Yves Le Bissonnais. (2006). “Aggregate stability and microbialcommunity dynamics under drying–wetting cycles in a silt loam soil,” Soil Biology and Biochemistry,Volume 38, Issue 8, August 2006, Pages 2053-2062Lehmann, J. (2007). “Bio-energy in the Black,” Front Ecol Environ 5(7): 381-387 (2007)Lehmann, J., and M. Rondon. (2006). Biological Approaches to Sustainable Soil Systems .http://soil.scijournals.org/cgi/content/full/69/6/1912Liang, B., Lehmann, J., Solomona, D., Kinyangia, J., Grossman, J., ONeilla, B., Skjemstadb, J.O.,Thiesa, J., Luizãoc, F.J., Petersend, J., and E. G. Nevese. (2006). “Black Carbon Increases CationExchange Capacity in Soils,” Soil Science Society of American Journal 70:1719-1730 (2006)http://soil.scijournals.org/cgi/content/full/70/5/1719Park, E.J., and A.J.M. Smucker. (2005). “Erosive Strengths of Concentric Regions within SoilMacroaggregates,” Soil Science Society of American Journal 69:1912-1921 (2005).http://soil.scijournals.org/cgi/content/full/69/6/1912Park, E.J., and A.J.M. Smucker. (2005). “Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity and Porosity withinMacroaggregates Modified by Tillage,” Soil Science Society of American Journal 69:38–45 (2005).http://soil.scijournals.org/cgi/reprint/69/1/38.pdf
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