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Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
Disaster Recovery Planning
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Disaster Recovery Planning

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Presented at "forum mahasiswa prodi manajemen" Ma Chung University

Presented at "forum mahasiswa prodi manajemen" Ma Chung University

Published in: Business, Technology
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  • 1. DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING Soetam Rizky
  • 2. WHY ? <ul><li>A study released by Harris Interactive, Inc. in September 2006 indicated that 39% of CIOs who participated in the survey lacked confidence in their disaster readiness. </li></ul><ul><li>24% of CIOs in 2004 felt their disaster plans were inadequate. </li></ul><ul><li>The World Trade Center bombing in Manhattan in 1993 resulted in 150 out of the 350 businesses located in the center going out of business—that’s about a 42% failure rate. </li></ul>
  • 3. WHY ?
  • 4. DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING What is “Disaster” ? From where is disaster come ? Are we care about it ? A disaster can best be defined as the occurrence of any event that causes a significant disruption in IT capabilities. It is typically an event that disrupts the normal course of business to the extent that monetary losses can be quantified (Maiwald,2002). <ul><li>Disaster not only be happen from nature anger, for example : earthquake, tsunami and flood. </li></ul><ul><li>However, the disaster can also happen from non-technical factors, for instance : electricity failure, hardware failure, virus or even human errors </li></ul><ul><li>Information system implementation rarely care about disaster recovery planning. </li></ul><ul><li>Eventhough datas from the application is very important for company, high level management seems ignoring all of the risk that can be happened in their company when the disaster come. </li></ul>
  • 5. DISASTER RECOVERY PLANNING <ul><li>Can guarantee trustworthiness in customer relationship, whether the company doing manufacturing business or services business. </li></ul><ul><li>Also undertaking business continuity planning that should come afterward disaster recovery planning </li></ul><ul><li>A business continuity plan can be considered the all-encompassing corporate plan that describes the processes and procedures an organization puts in place to ensure all aspects of business can resume and be recovered should a disruption occur </li></ul>
  • 6. BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING (BCP) <ul><li>A methodology used to create and validate a plan for maintaining continuous business operations before, during, and after disasters and disruptive events. </li></ul><ul><li>Companies require their businesses run continuously, and their overall operational plans reflect this priority regardless of the potential risk, threat, or cause of an outage. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex : server downtime strategy, old Y2k issue </li></ul>
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  • 11. COST OF DOWNTIME <ul><li>Step 1: Identify the Business Continuity Components That You Will Focus On </li></ul><ul><ul><li>People — How will you notify, evacuate, transport, and care for employees (including, for example, paying them)? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Property — What equipment will you need and how will you source it? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Systems — What portions of your computing and telecommunications infrastructure must be duplicated immediately? Is that in a minute, an hour, or a day? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data — What data is critical to run your business, and how will you recover critical data that's lost? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Step 2: Define What You're Protecting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Define what IT elements associated with those competencies must be protected. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>These competencies are the heart of what your business does and your unique proposition in the market - your competitive advan- tage. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A core competency could be a product, service, process, or methodology </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Step 3: Prioritize Business Functions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vault Management— The company's primary operational system that manages off-site tape inventories and movement. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customer Facing Applications— All hardware and software used by customers to retrieve information on their off-site data or to communicate with Iron Mountain about their account(s). </li></ul></ul>
  • 12. GRAMM-LEACH-BLILEY ACT (GLBA) <ul><li>Enacted in late 1999 and was intended to enhance competition in the financial services industry. </li></ul><ul><li>Requires financial institutions (and others that operate in the financial services industry) to create and implement policies to protect private information from foreseeable threats in both security and data integrity. </li></ul>
  • 13. GRAMM-LEACH-BLILEY ACT (GLBA) <ul><li>At least one employee assigned to manage the safeguards </li></ul><ul><li>A thorough risk management plan for each department that handles nonpublic information </li></ul><ul><li>A plan to develop, implement, test, manage, and monitor data security </li></ul><ul><li>A process for updating and changing the plan as methods of collecting, storing, transmitting, and managing data change </li></ul>
  • 14.  
  • 15. CONCLUSION <ul><li>There are disasters from many sources, anytime, anywhere. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s not just about disaster recovery planning, it also about business continuity planning </li></ul><ul><li>Auditors must recommend and checked client’s DRP and BCP </li></ul><ul><li>And, last but not least, the institution must aware about disaster. </li></ul>

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