SOC 1013.005 (Q)
Introduction to Sociology
Spring, 2013
Tues / Thurs 2:00-3:15
SB 2.03.12

Instructor:
Email:

Michael Mil...
Course Management System:
Blackboard Learn is available by virtue of enrollment in this class. It is a vitally important r...
5. Notetaking. PowerPoint slides are regularly used in class to overview key ideas. Such slides will
include images, graph...
Course Schedule

Week 1
Jan 15
Topic:

Course Orientation

Jan 17
Topic:

What Is Sociology?

Text Assignment:

Barkan - 1...
Jan 31
Topic:

Sociological Knowledge & Research (continued)

Video Assignment:
The Joy of Stats
Why is Hans Rosling excit...
Week 6
Feb 19
Topic:

Developmental Socialization

Video Assignment:
Growing Up Online and digital_nation
Growing Up Onlin...
Week 9
Mar 11-15

Spring Break

Week 10
Mar 19
Topic:

Interpersonal Influence: Compliance Techniques

Video Assignments:
...
Week 12
Apr 2

Exam 2

Apr 4

Exam Review

Week 13
Apr 9
Topic:

Race / Ethnicity

Text Assignment:

Barkan - 10

Apr 11
T...
Banished: The Lost Boys of Polygamy
How to Breakup with Your Girlfriend in 64 Easy Steps

Week 15
Apr 23
Topic:

Sex and G...
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  1. 1. SOC 1013.005 (Q) Introduction to Sociology Spring, 2013 Tues / Thurs 2:00-3:15 SB 2.03.12 Instructor: Email: Michael Miller michael.miller@utsa.edu Office Address: Office Hours: MS 4.02.26 T / R, 12:45-1:45 Text: Barkan, S. (2011) Sociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World. Comprehensive Edition (Note: This is an eBook. You may order at http://students.flatworldknowledge.com/course/1247035) The Course: Description SOC 1013.001 (Q) is an introduction to the study of human life within the context of various types of collectivities, including relationships, groups, formal organizations, communities, and societies. Course attention will therefore be devoted to understanding the structure and dynamics of human behavior by reference to social explanations. We will examine a core set of concepts and principles related to theory, methods, culture, and social structure, and as well, survey various sociology subfields, including social stratification, race and ethnic relations, work and occupations, demography, marriage and family, and religion. This section of SOC 1013 is also a Q-course, which means we will pay special attention to working with quantitative data as these topics are addressed over the semester. Additionally, this section of SOC 1013 is a hybrid course in that it combines conventional in-class teaching with supplemental instruction derived through online content. You will be required to devote out-of-class time to examining media programs and clips linked to the course via this syllabus. To learn about my approach to teaching with media, read A System for Integrating Online Multimedia Into College Curriculum. Course Objectives The course provides an opportunity for you to learn to see the social world and human behavior more clearly and objectively through the major concepts, theories, and findings of the discipline. As a Qcourse, it will also encourage you to develop quantitative skills by requiring you to describe, analyze, and interpret data. Course objectives will be sought through class lectures and discussions, text readings, and online assignments. Degree-Program Requirement Successful completion of the course meets the UTSA’s Quantitative Scholarship requirement (see requirement #3). In addition, SOC 1013 satisfies 3 hours of the 18-hour Core Curriculum requirement for Social and Behavioral Sciences.
  2. 2. Course Management System: Blackboard Learn is available by virtue of enrollment in this class. It is a vitally important resource which will allow you access to the course syllabus, assigned materials, and course grades. (Let me know immediately if you have any difficulties with this site.) Student Contributions: The course requires your active involvement. At the minimum, you are expected to attend class, read text assignments, cover assigned Internet materials prior to class, and take examinations as specified. To facilitate your success, consider the following suggestions: 1. You are responsible for becoming familiar with all rules concerning conduct, including those relevant to scholastic dishonesty (see The Student Code of Conduct). You are also expected to reflect the Roadrunner Creed in your behavior, and adhere as well, to the UTSA Honor Code. 2. Do not be a “spectator.” Your success in the class will be proportional to your engagement. This is your class—actively participate. Ask questions, discuss experiences, offer opinions... Get to know other students (exchange phone numbers/email addresses). Talk about the course, share lecture notes, hold study sessions before exams... 3. Read / watch / listen to assigned text and Internet materials before the presentation date. In reading the text, make sure you also study tables, charts, and graphs. It will be helpful to take notes as you watch videos and listen to audios. 4. Should you have any concern or problem that is affecting, or may affect, your academic status or class involvement, please communicate with me about it. If posted meeting times are inconvenient, you may arrange a conference at another time. Note: all e-mail communication should be directed to me at michael.miller@utsa.edu Support services, including registration assistance and adaptive equipment, are available to those with documented disabilities through the Office of Disability Services, MS 2.03.18. Call 458-4157 to make arrangements. Course Practices and Policies: 1. Student Survey. During the first week, please complete an online survey about yourself in order to better meet your learning needs. 2. Class Beginning. A few minutes before starting each class, a selection of popular music may be played that in some way relates to the topic to be discussed that morning. Please listen in silence and try to determine how the lyrics of the song are relevant to topic concepts. At the conclusion of the song, volunteers will be called on for brief discussion. Note: My knowledge of current popular music is quite limited—therefore, any song contribution from you would be appreciated (please e-mail suggestions to me with brief description of how the music applies to concepts). 3. Attendance. Regular attendance is crucial to success in the course. 4. Coming Late. Please enter and take a seat without disrupting others.
  3. 3. 5. Notetaking. PowerPoint slides are regularly used in class to overview key ideas. Such slides will include images, graphics, animations, and video. Understand that your notetaking effort should be directed to what I am saying, rather than solely the slides. Slides are not posted. 6. Lighting. To facilitate multimedia display, classroom lighting will be kept at a dim level. If you find this to be a problem for notetaking, try attaching a very dim reading light to your notebook. During some videos, lighting will be turned off altogether. Do not try to negotiate the stairs at these times. 7. Class Ending. Do not attempt to leave (nor pack-up) until I specify that the class is over. Class ends at 3:15—please let me know if I run past that time. 8. Technology Use. Avoid embarrassment: turn your cell phone off before class starts. Under no circumstances can a cell phone be out during an exam. The use of laptop and tablet computers is permitted during class for course purposes only. 9. Grade Reporting. All scantrons and Q assignments (except the final exam) will be returned to you in class (no one else may pick these up for you). Grades will also be made available to you on Blackboard (grades cannot be reported to you by telephone, fax, or e-mail). 10. Drop Procedure. Should you decide to no longer attend, be sure to follow appropriate UTSA administrative requirements. A grade of F will be assigned upon failure to properly withdraw from the course. Evaluation Exams: Three exams, including a non-cumulative final exam, will be administered over the semester. Each exam will consist of 50 multiple-choice questions, and will account collectively for 75 percent of your final grade. You will need to provide a Scantron grading sheet (882) for each exam. Should you miss an exam for a valid reason, you must submit a written request (paper copy) for a make-up exam, including thirdparty documentation for your absence, at the time of your return to class. All make-up exams will consist of essay-length questions, and will be administered immediately after your completion of the final exam. Q-Course Assignments: Given that this section of SOC 1013 is a Q-course, you will be required to work with data. Assignment submissions should reflect only your own efforts, and will collectively account for 25 percent of your final grade. Due Dates: Q Assignment 1 – Feb 14 Q Assignment 2 – March 7 Q Assignment 3 – April 25 Grading Scale: Exams, Q assignments, and your final average should be interpreted on the following basis: A = > 89 B = 80 - 89 C = 70 - 79 D = 60 - 69 F = < 60
  4. 4. Course Schedule Week 1 Jan 15 Topic: Course Orientation Jan 17 Topic: What Is Sociology? Text Assignment: Barkan - 1 Reading Assignment: What is it about 20-Somethings? In the opinion of the writer, identify the main reasons why young adults, including most college students today, are taking so long to assume adulthood. Which parts of this argument are consistent with your observations and experiences? Which are not? Video Assignments: Know Thine Enemy In what important ways does this brief video suggest a sociological approach to understanding human behavior? A Radical Experiment in Empathy Sam Richards suggests that empathy is perhaps the most important point to sociology. How does he propose we develop empathy? If we do this, what does Richards assert will likely happen? Identify how what he has to say directly relates to the Know Thine Enemy clip. For Your Information: Majoring in Sociology Week 2 Jan 22 Topic: Culture Text Assignment: Barkan - 3 For Your Enjoyment: George Carlin: Modern Man Jan 24 Topic: Culture: Key Components Video Assignments: Becoming Human (Part 1) (Part 2) (Part 3) Watch all three parts of this fascinating NOVA series to understand the basic course of human evolution. Be sure to identify the ways we are alike and the ways we are different from our nearest primate relatives. The Millennials Are Coming! To what extent do you believe that this description is accurate about others you know of this generation? If you are of this age group, how well does it describe you? For Your Enjoyment: Hamburger Virgins The Distant Mirror Week 3 Jan 29 Topic: Sociological Knowledge & Research Text Assignment: Barkan - 2
  5. 5. Jan 31 Topic: Sociological Knowledge & Research (continued) Video Assignment: The Joy of Stats Why is Hans Rosling excited by statistics? What are statistics, according to him? When did their collection begin, by whom, and for what purposes? What utility do statistics have today for us? Identify examples that Rosling gives about their tremendous current public value. For Your Information: Stochasticity Week 4 Feb 5 Topic: Data Visualization Video Assignment: Martin Wattenberg: Turning Words into Pictures Wattenberg discusses some of the data visualization programs he’s recently developed. Identify each of his innovations and describe what each can do. (You may find it especially fun to play around with his Baby Name Wizard.) Reading Assignment: Word Cloud: How Toy Ad Vocabulary Reinforces Gender Stereotypes Compare and contrast the content of “boy” versus “girl” toy ads. To what extent do such ads play on traditional gender stereotypes? For Your Information: The Beauty of Data Visualization Shocking Stats Feb 7 Topic: Structure/Interaction: Status & Role Text Assignment: Barkan - 5 Week 5 Feb 12 Topic: Structure/Interaction: Status & Role (continued) Video Assignments: Interrogator Interview Zimbardo: Prison Experiment Why do decent people sometimes do bad things? Compare and contrast Zimbardo's experiment with the case of Abu Ghraib. Consider the extent to which we "become" our roles. How likely are we to identify with the roles we play, no matter how disagreeable they might personally seem to us at first glance? While watching these videos, consider the following questions: 1. How did those (soldiers and students) who served as guards generally come to behave? 2. For what purposes were prisoners subjected to abuses by guards? 3. Why did the guards engage in such behavior? 4. Do you think that you could have personally resisted "becoming" fully absorbed in either role? 5. What lessons about human behavior can we learn from these two video clips? Cab Driver to Donate Kidney In your opinion, what is the most remarkable thing about this cab driver (other than volunteering to donate a kidney to a customer)? Feb 14 Topic: Socialization: Self and Society Text Assignment: Barkan - 4 Due: Q Assignment 1
  6. 6. Week 6 Feb 19 Topic: Developmental Socialization Video Assignment: Growing Up Online and digital_nation Growing Up Online and its follow-up, digital_nation, address many aspects of life in a plugged-in, hyper-connected, digital society. Identify the major ways technology and the Internet have altered life over the past 20 years or so. To what extent are your observations and experiences consistent with those made in the two documentaries? For Your Information: Spartan Boot Camp Feb 21 Topic: Resocialization Video Assignment: Lord's Children Who are “child soldiers”—i.e., where are they from, how do they come to be, what are they forced to do, what impact does becoming one have on them? How are they commonly treated by family members when they escape? Describe efforts to resocialize them. Generally, how effective are such efforts? Note: the video, KONY 2012 http://vimeo.com/37119711, went viral on the Internet during 2012 and has sparked a large-scale movement to publicize the atrocities of the LRA and capture Kony (see http://invisiblechildren.com/), as well as a torrent of subsequent controversy (see, e.g., http://www.huffingtonpost.com/fatima-muneer/the-kony-2012-controversy_b_1503990.html). Week 7 Feb 26 First Exam Feb 28 Exam Review Week 8 Mar 5 Topic: Social Organization and Group Dynamics Text Assignment: Barkan - 6 Mar 7 Topic: Social Organization and Group Dynamics (continued) Video Assignment: Constructing Social Reality Scroll down to Program 20 – “Constructing Social Reality” and then click on the “VoD” icon on right side of selection. You may then need to register at the site to gain free access to streamed videos. After retrieving film, enlarge viewing area by placing cursor on video image, right clicking, then > “zoom” > “full screen”. What is social reality? How is it constructed? Do people have different “realities”? How is it possible that subjective realities may become actual realities? Also be able to describe the following: Elliott’s “brown-eyed/blue-eyed” experiment, Rosenthal’s “Pygmalion effect,” Aronson’s “jigsaw classroom,” and Cialdini’s strategies of influence. For Your Information: Why I Hate Beauty Up and Then Down Trapped in an Elevator Why homeless hero Hugo Alfredo Tale-Yax Died on NYC Street Due: Q Assignment 2
  7. 7. Week 9 Mar 11-15 Spring Break Week 10 Mar 19 Topic: Interpersonal Influence: Compliance Techniques Video Assignments: Hassan Cult Interviews (view all 3 parts) Identify the manipulative procedures commonly used to recruit people into some organizations and groups. (For additional information, see http://www.freedomofmind.com/resourcecenter/articles/BITE.htm.) Before You Enlist Identify the compliance tactics recruiters employ to manuever young adults into volunteering for the U.S. military. What does the video allege that recruiters never mention before they get them to sign on the dotted line? For Your Information: Changing Minds Bookmark and then take time to go through this compilation of principles, techniques, and tips devoted to helping one more effectively interact with others. For example, learn to better detect lying by visiting http://www.changingminds.org/explanations/behaviors/lying/detecting_lies.htm Mar 21 Topic: Population and Urbanization Text Assignment: Barkan - 19 Video Assignments: Basic Population Concepts/Issues Click on each topic in the "Population Animations" box, and then for each, click "launch movie." This site provides flash video tutorials for several concepts and issues that are critical to demography. Review each tutorial to be sure you understand relevant concepts and issues. World’s Toilet Crisis Identify the scope of the problem. Describe the public health implications of this problem. Are the proposed solutions to the problem workable, in your opinion? For Your Information: 7 billion The Disappearing Male Immigration Resources, NY Times Week 11 Mar 26 Topic: Social Stratification and Inequality Text Assignment: Barkan – 8 Mar 28 Topic: Social Class in the U.S. Video Assignment: Poor Us: An Animated History of Poverty Why does poverty exist? Identify varied approaches to resolving poverty, and determine if poverty can ever be solved. For Your Information: NY Times: Class Matters Big Spenders
  8. 8. Week 12 Apr 2 Exam 2 Apr 4 Exam Review Week 13 Apr 9 Topic: Race / Ethnicity Text Assignment: Barkan - 10 Apr 11 Topic: Race / Ethnicity (continued) Video Assignments: Freedom Riders Who were the Freedom Riders? What was the purpose of their activities? What kinds of public reactions did they encounter? Why were such reactions common? How successful were they in accomplishing their goals? Had you been alive during this era, how likely would you have been to volunteer to be a Freedom Rider? A Girl Like Me Short documentary produced by teen that addresses the problem of minority self-hatred. What forces are at work producing such biases? Interactive Assignment: Implicit Association Test Take the test. What did you find out about yourself? Are you "racially biased," according to test results? For Your Information: Prom Night in Mississippi Shopping While Black Satchel: Confronting Racism One Fastball at a Time Massacre at Murambi A Class Divided Week 14 Apr 16 Topic: Marriage and Family Text Assignment: Barkan - 15 Apr 18 Topic: Marriage and Family (continued) Video Assignment: Child Brides: Stolen Lives Identify the major ways early marriage negatively affects the lives of such youth, particularly girls. For Your Information: That Thing Called Love Multiple Husbands American Marriage Science of Seduction: Love Under a Microscope Science of Seduction: Love is in the Air Science of Seduction: Love: The Single Biggest Prize Friends with Benefits Arranged Marriage Surrogacy Factory
  9. 9. Banished: The Lost Boys of Polygamy How to Breakup with Your Girlfriend in 64 Easy Steps Week 15 Apr 23 Topic: Sex and Gender Text Assignment: Barkan - 11 For Your Information: Gender Ads Sexual Identity Would You Help This Gay Couple? Women at Arms Portraying Cougars Battle of the Sexes 34-25-36 What Would Penis Do? For Your Enjoyment: Apr 25 Topic: Work and Economy Text Assignment: Barkan - 13 For Your Information: The Corporation Secret History of the Credit Card The Undertaking Due: Q Assignment 3 Week 16 Apr 30 Topic: Religion Text Assignment: Barkan - 17 For Your Information: God in America Week 17 May 9 Final Exam (Thursday, 10:30)

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