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Things I Swear I Will Never Do To Someone Else
 

Things I Swear I Will Never Do To Someone Else

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Things I Swear I Will Never Do To Someone Else Things I Swear I Will Never Do To Someone Else Presentation Transcript

  • Things I Swear I’ll Never Do to Someone Else A Sockets and Lightbulbs Presentation Blog.SocketsandLightbulbs.com
  • What Do These Have In Common?
  • What Do These Have In Common?
  • What Do These Have In Common?
  • What Do These Have In Common?
  • What Do These Have In Common?
  • Teamwork!
  • The List Many years ago, as I moved from the supplier to the customer side of the desk, I wrote a list of things I would never do and of best practices. This talk is Version 2.0 of that list.
  • This presentation has been modified from its original format for SlideShare.net. The characters and events in this story are fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental. © 2010 All Rights Reserved
  • It’s All About Relationships Building great products involves partnerships bet ween all the creative, technical and business functions on your development team and with your support teams like IT, HR, QA, etc. Depending on your company and project, you may even need to create partnerships and share bet ween other development teams, outsourcers and publishers. Invest in these partnerships before the crisis.
  • I Swear I Will NEVER...
  • Never forget that I am dealing with another human being
  • The Story of Warren... One morning Warren was woken up by his Blackberry. Ed, an Important Executive, said: “Meet me in Karl’s office in 10 minutes,” and then hung up. Now awake, Warren waited the 10 minutes and called Karl’s office. Karl and Ed immediately went into all the details of the latest crisis. Could Karl attend a meeting in t wo hours and help them figure out what to do? Warren was happy to help, but he wouldn’t be able to attend the meeting because the commute from his hotel room in Hawaii was a bit far. Karl and Ed didn’t stop long enough to find out that Warren was on vacation.
  • Get to Know the Person Greet them and ask how they are doing Get to know people beyond what they do at work Recognize when and why they are stressed out and ask how you can help Give them some slack when they need it
  • Never sacrifice internal relationships Customers and suppliers will come and go, but you’ll need to work with your internal partners every day.
  • The Story of Super Producer... We’ve all been there. A customer calls – something is wrong and it needs to be fixed NOW! You’ve delivered a build that doesn’t work. A focus group thinks the game needs to be “more fun”. The requirements have changed. Marketing needs a new demo yesterday! So what happens next? We spring into Super Producer mode and jump into action. We demand that the CTO get programmers from the Engine team to drop everything and be on site NOW to help your programmers fix the bug. Need more fun? No problem. Tell the outsourcing coordinator to stop negotiating that contract for that other team and find you a better character artist. What do you mean he can’t get to it now? Well, then just hand over the list and we’ll take care of it ourselves. You get the picture. The job may get done, but some bridges got burned along the way.
  • Internal Relationships Customers/suppliers come and go Always ask, don’t demand Take responsibility for mistakes Focus on what needs to get done now Your partners are busy, too
  • Never assume my partner is psychic
  • The Story of Natasha... As a manufacturing Program Manager, Natasha built her production schedule from the Engineering bring-up plan that listed all the required hardware and when it needed to be built. In a weekly project status meetings, the Director of Engineering decided that the overall project was delayed because manufacturing wasn’t delivering. The Director stated that the plan was ALWAYS to build 282 assemblies, but Natasha’s plan only had 260. She was missing an entire build! The new quantity was decided three weeks earlier in an Engineering meeting... Natasha wasn’t invited to. Several people who should have informed her of the decision... didn’t. Yes, she asked. The bring-up plan - supposedly the definitive source of information - was never updated. Still, in front of all the stakeholders, the Director of Engineering made it clear that she expected Natasha to know.
  • Psychic Investment Make sure all information is communicated in the format it needs to be received. Use the 5 W’s Use the 5 Why’s Look for opportunities to understand each other’s process Follow up!
  • Never make it about the person
  • The Story of Joe... Less than a week before Joe needed to deliver an important demo, a bunch of work-in-progress files were deleted off of a shared net work drive, killing about 2 weeks of work. Another artist, needing space for his own files, asked his project manager if the files currently taking a lot of space were actually needed for anything. Rather than redirecting this artist to Joe, the PM thought that since he didn’t recognize the files that it would be okay to delete them. Joe was devastated when he discovered the next morning that all his work had disappeared. Joe’s Producer was livid, blaming Joe for everything from screwing up the demo to hurting the relationship with the client. When the files couldn’t be recovered, IT deflected any question about lack of user security and back-ups by blaming Joe for not following clear file-naming conventions. Joe immediately took responsibility for his part in the matter, but still lost yet another day of work answering to it over and over again. No one said anything to the PM and the artist about their involvement.
  • Never, ever lie
  • The Story of Veronica... In a job interview, Veronica bluntly asked the Vice President of the company whether they had done any layoffs during the last recession. It was a fair question. She wanted to know how the company responded to a major downturn. The Vice President looked her straight in the eye and told her that they did not do any layoffs. She thought that was strange, since small companies were going out of business and big companies had major layoffs and wage freezes. Plus, she passed a lot of empty desks on the way to the VP’s office for the inter view. Thinking she was reading into things too much, she took the job. Within days of starting her new job, Veronica found out that half the company was let go t wo years earlier, in the depth of the recession. She immediately started to wonder: what else did they lie about?
  • Choose Truth - Deal With the Issues Lying and pointing fingers always catches up Admit you don’t know the answer Stick to the facts, especially when breaking bad news Provide both corrective and preventative action Use risk analysis to help craft a truthful message
  • Never use excessive punishment or reward
  • The Stories of Nathan and Hannah... Nathan was a talented programmer who loved being in the zone where he could work alone on low-level code and deliver cool solutions within t wo hours. When his lead got promoted, Nathan, being the next most senior programmer, was pushed into being team lead. This required him to a) work with teams, b) design a large part of the engine, and c) deal with a team of artists looking for programmer support. His management team knew he had no experience with any of thand did not provide any support. Nathan was miserable, the people around him were miserable, the engine was a mess and the artists were complaining that they weren’t getting any support. He was eventually moved out of the lead role, but both Nathan and his team saw that as his punishment for failing. Nathan then had to endure the daily criticisms of the work he had done on the engine – an ongoing punishment. He also no longer got to do the type of work he loved. So his misery continued and due to his declining performance, his raises and bonuses also declined. Eventually, he left the company. Hannah’s story is different. She had a breakdown in her manager’s office. It was a classic case of stress. The project was going badly, she had been working long hours and just wanted to let her manager know how she felt. A few days later, the team was gathered in a conference room where her manager happily announced that he was giving Hannah a major merit award! He presented her with a nice gift and a cheque for $1000. Hannah was completely embarrassed because it wasn’t what she needed or wanted.
  • Consistent Progression Consequences Reward Provide support to correct Don’t pay for suffering; listen situation for what they need 3-strike rule: Progressive reward system 1. Informal notification; request 1. Define your project’s key criteria response/action for reward 2. Formal notification; require 2. Establish the levels of important, response/action key and mission critical contribution 3. Formal notification; business consequences 3. Assign the appropriate reward structure If it’s a business-affecting issue, then go straight to Be consistent! “Strike 3”
  • Consistent Progression IMPORTANCE Reward Structure C O N Duration Skill Effort 4 & 5 Points = $ T R Important I (1 point) Bob 6 & 7 Points = $$ B U Key 8 & 9 Points = $$$ (2 points) T I O Mission Critical Bob Bob Bob N (3 points) 7 points = $$
  • Never forget to say “Thank You”
  • A Personal Story... After I spent several days on a customer’s floor, fixing a variety of issues, several high-level managers came by as I wrapped up my work and thanked me for being there and helping. That felt pretty good, but it was a strange feeling. I realized that I had spent many evenings and weekends doing the same thing on my own production floor, but I couldn’t recall the last time I had been thanked by my own management team. So, I wrote it as the last point on my trip report. All of a sudden all the managers on my project were saying thank you ALL THE TIME. (This also affirmed a long held belief that managers only remember the first point and the last point on a report.)
  • We’re Only Human Take a moment and write your own list Build relationships early and often Take the time to understand Choose truth – deal with the issues Progression of consequences and rewards
  • Thank You! Merci!
  • Photo Credits Cover: Photo by Jason Della Rocca, http://www.realitypanic.com/archives/415 Slide 2 (clockwise from top left): image courtesy of Google; cisco.com; kensington.com; Photo by Liza Wood Slide 3: http://www.toastmasters.org/MainMenuCategories/FreeResources/ QuestionsaboutLeadership/Teamwork.aspx Slide 6: image courtesy of Google Slide 10: Photo by Genevieve Gelinas Slide 11: image courtesy of Google Slide 14: http:/ vindy.typepad.com/photos/the_neon_lights_of_muncie/psychic.html /t Slide 19: Photo by Philipp Hienstorfer Slide 22: (left) Photo by Adam Jones adamjones.freeser vers.com; (right) Paste’s Tax Refund Playlist: Cash Money Mix, by Caitlin Strandberg, pastemagazine.com Slide 26: http://www.soka.edu/giving/ways-to-give.aspx Slide 28: Photo by Karora All other photos by Liza Wood.