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Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities
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Richard brandon - MLL Telecom - Delivering shared networks for local authorities

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Presentation to delegates at the annual conference of Socitm, the public sector IT association, on 11 October 2010.

Presentation to delegates at the annual conference of Socitm, the public sector IT association, on 11 October 2010.

Published in: Business, Technology
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  1. Delivering Shared Networks for Local Authorities Richard Brandon, Head of Strategy MLL Telecom
  2. Who are MLL Telecom? Specialists in Public Sector networks A Licensed Network Operator A BT Openreach service integrator Inside some of the UK’s largest networks UK-wide radio spectrum
  3. Customer Experience Telecoms Local Healthcare Blue Light Authorities & Schools Higher Education
  4. What our customers say "This project has delivered on all counts. We've improved school internet and computer technology and we're making it easier and cheaper for residents to contact us.” Councillor Bob Tidy, lead member for e-government at East Sussex CC “Manchester Fire and Rescue Service has been working with MLL since the 1990's and we have always received exemplary service from them. I would highly recommend MLL Telecom to any other blue light service, or in fact anyone at all looking for a reliable network provider.” Graham Settle , C3 Systems Manager, Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service “MLL has proved a valuable partner in delivering hard to reach connections to enable BT to deliver a great service at a price which is competitive for our customers”. John Miller, BT Head of Complex Networks
  5. Why Share Networks? What is the business case?
  6. A shared network is an infrastructure for the community Councils Schools Libraries Healthcare Police Fire and Rescue Further Education Third sector (charity workers) The digitally excluded
  7. Value for money A shared network saves cost… so the business case should stack up on its own. But it will also… be a necessary platform for other shared services and systems encourage flexible use of property enable joined-up government, processes and intelligence across organisations
  8. A Platform for Learning Skills Allows effective operation of Learning Platforms Supports personalised Learning Students move from consumers to collaborators Enables pupil, teacher and parent innovation Enables flexible use of facilities such as for adult education … increased bandwidth, and broadband in particular, has had a significant impact on the quality and range of work that schools can undertake… Ofsted’s report ICT in Schools 2004
  9. A Platform for Digital Inclusion A shared community network can pass closer to broadband ‘notspots’ than a commercial network WiMax, WiFi or cable can cover the last mile – Caveat – highly topology dependent Funding potentially available from BDUK (Broadband Delivery UK) “Broadband is the most critical issue facing small businesses today.” Federation of Small Businesses
  10. A Platform for a Healthy Community Digital Inclusion – Access for the socially disadvantaged Integrated services – Processes, Data, Applications Care closer to home – Common access for Social worker, health worker, mental health worker… Enables ‘Social Capital’ – Connects local people to deliver collaborative solutions
  11. Technology Challenges Why so hard?
  12. Shared Networks - the options Council Health Police Private ‘Private Trust Network Shared Network’ School School Public Network Lower cost Police Health Council
  13. Traditional private networks – Point-to-point leased lines •Security But what’s inside the cloud? •Availability •Reach •Assured capacity •Flexibility
  14. What is inside private networks Multiple redundant fibres into same site Multiple CPE ports Multiple fibres in ££ common duct – £ £ single point of failure Moving a core site is LE LE costly and complex Traffic ‘trombones’ in LE LE and out of core £ £ access links ££
  15. What you can get from a ‘Private Shared’ Network Less fibres used can lower cost Simpler CPE Less single £ points of failure Flexible property LE LE Dedicated utilisation Switched Optimum traffic Core LE LE routing £ Multiple VPN’s with QoS for traffic separation
  16. The technology toolkit Latest best practice
  17. Pervasive Wireless Networks – WiMAX and WiFI Wifi – Short distances, limited indoor coverage, ubiquitous device support WiMAX – Long(er) distances, supports roaming, needs specialised devices MLL delivered the first successful WiMAX network in the UK – Maidstone Council, Kent – WiMAX radio network – Wireless Backhaul – Roaming – Planning, site acquisition and 24x7 proactive management Applications included – Mobile broadband video to blue light services – CCTV backhaul – Mobile broadband for council planning officers – Residential broadband reach
  18. Wireless Links Variable excess construction charges ine 5 year cost dL F ixe Wireless Variable site acquisition charges Distance Line of sight required Licensed or light-licensed spectrum – assures interference-free links Point-to Point or Point-to-Multipoint Ethernet or SDH Proactively managed service with SLA
  19. Ethernet First Mile (EFM or G.SHDSL) technology 2-40Mbit/s available across BT Openreach copper pairs This is not the same as residential ADSL – Symmetric – Uncontended Viable up to 3km from an exchange – reaches 85% of public sector locations – Up to 8 pairs increases speed – Shorter distances increase speed Caveats – BT can’t guarantee performance of copper pairs old copper other services share cables copper pairs unavailable for survey prior to quote Ideal solution for schools, GP surgeries and smaller council offices
  20. SOCITM Stand Demonstration Multiple real-time DVD streams 40Mbit/s □►■ Ethernet □►■ EFM EFM □►■ DSLAM NTE 8 Copper pairs 40Mbit/s Ethernet
  21. Fibre Services Point-to-point leased lines Premise-to-premise SDH or Ethernet BT Openreach fibre services – Exchange-to-premise – Exchange-to-exchange – Much lower cost – 10Mbit/s -1Gbit/s
  22. Private Local Loop Unbundling – using the UK’s infrastructure for your network Your Network in BT Your Exchanges Locations BT EBD BT EAD 10Mbit/s – 1GBit/s BT E AD Switch BT EAD EFM NTE CPE 1Gbit/s – 10GBit/s 2Mbit/s – 10MBit/s DSLAM 2-Pair Copper 4-Pair Copper 8-Pair Copper EFM BT EBD DSLAM x-Pair Copper BT EAD BT EAD Switch
  23. Typical County Level Example – using all the components 700 end-user locations 1,500 pieces of networking hardware 1,900 circuits IP/MPLS Core Router Network BT GE (EBD) Core Circuits BT GE (EAD) Backhaul Circuits BT FE (EAD) Backhaul Circuits BT EFM Copper Pair (G.SHDSL) Circuits DSLAMs DSLAM NTEs Core sites CPE Routers Aggregation sites Customer locations
  24. Example of Redundant Core Topology (place names hidden for commercial confidence)
  25. Example of access topology (place names hidden for commercial confidence)
  26. Performance Expectations – telco grade for a private network Actual results based on best practice design and equipment Number of closed user groups supported – 1,000 different private communities Re-convergence when re-routing around end-to-end failure – <4 seconds Re-convergence when re-routing around core failure – 500 milliseconds Latency end-to-end – 600 μsecs (0.6 milliseconds) Encryption Multiple traffic queues Redundant power supplies on all shared equipment Shared equipment housed in locked cabinets in secure BT exchanges
  27. How to make it happen? Practical considerations
  28. Organisational considerations Who should be on the governance body? Who will encourage other local partners onto the network? Don’t forget CCTV, rural broadband and healthcare as stakeholders Who assures different stakeholders their fair share of usage and security? How is the initial seed network funded?
  29. How to get the greatest benefit with the least risk Share as much as possible – density of sites drives down the operator’s costs Use the UK’s existing infrastructure – work with a licensed operator or one of their partners to get access to existing BT copper and fibre – Take advantage of other operators’ fibre where it is available Get a bespoke network at a bespoke price – generic tariffs don’t allow you to benefit from your own economy of scale Dual-running costs are inevitable – a turnkey solution will minimise risk of projects over-running Use a sector specialist – They won’t try and solve your public sector problem with a generic solution
  30. Thank you

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