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SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource
SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource
SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource
SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource
SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource
SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource
SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource
SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource
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SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource

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  • 1. What are life chances?<br />To be able to define life chances.<br />To give examples of inequality in life chances.<br />
  • 2. What do the pictures say about inequality?<br />To be able to define life chances.<br />To give examples of inequality in life chances.<br />People’s lives may be influenced by factors beyond their control. These factors can influence many aspects of a person’s life such as their education, work and health.<br />
  • 3. Definition...<br />Life chances are...<br /> The chances that sections of society have of achieving the ‘things’ which are valued by their society.<br />By calculating and comparing the life chances of different sections of society, sociologists can map the pattern of inequality.<br />To be able to define life chances.<br />To give examples of inequality in life chances.<br />Explain how life chances in the UK are different to those in Africa<br />
  • 4. Example: Life expectancy in the UK<br />To be able to define life chances.<br />To give examples of inequality in life chances.<br />Glasgow city<br />69.9<br />80.0<br />South Norfolk<br />73.2<br />Blackpool<br />Kensington and Chelsea<br />82.2<br />
  • 5. Example 2<br />To be able to define life chances.<br />To give examples of inequality in life chances.<br />National statistics online<br />Looking at the table, what trend is apparent in the figures?<br />Identify as many factors as you can that might be related to children’s chances of having good teeth at the ages shown. Use the following headings:<br /><ul><li>The culture of the area or the family
  • 6. The resources of the family
  • 7. The condition of and the facilities in the area.</li></li></ul><li>Why are life chances unequal? <br />To be able to define life chances.<br />To give examples of inequality in life chances.<br />
  • 8. News article...<br />To be able to define life chances.<br />To give examples of inequality in life chances.<br /><ul><li>Key questions...
  • 9. What does the term social mobility mean?
  • 10. What are the differences in university attendance between the class groups?
  • 11. In what ways do middle class parents help their children?
  • 12. What have the government done to try and aid equality?
  • 13. What issues may get in the way of a child achieving?
  • 14. Give your view on the equality situation and explain your answer.</li></li></ul><li>To be able to define life chances.<br />To give examples of inequality in life chances.<br />What have I achieved today?<br />I can define what life chances are.<br />I can give examples of life chances.<br />I understand the impact that social class can have on life chances.<br />

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