SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource

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SociologyExchange.co.uk Shared Resource

  1. 1. CRIME AND DEVIANCE UNIT 7
  2. 2. LEARNING OBJECTIVE <ul><li>Describe what is meant by ‘crime’ and ‘deviance’ and explain the difference </li></ul><ul><li>Explain why the relationship between crime and deviance is not straight forward </li></ul>
  3. 3. ARE YOU A CRIMINAL?
  4. 4. Crime is…… <ul><li>In pairs write a definition of crime </li></ul>
  5. 5. Is crime a matter of opinion? <ul><li>Social norms change over time </li></ul><ul><li>Legal crimes reflect social norms and values </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Homosexuality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Women in bars </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Placing a stamp upside down on an envelope </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What is a crime in one society is not necessarily so in another </li></ul>Do you know anymore?
  6. 6. <ul><li>Attempted suicide was regarded as a criminal offence until 1961. </li></ul><ul><li>Homosexual acts between consenting adults was regarded as an offence until 1967. </li></ul><ul><li>Incest was NOT regarded as a crime until 1908. </li></ul><ul><li>More recently – smoking in </li></ul><ul><li>public places. </li></ul>Criminal behaviour is socially Constructed
  7. 7. CRIME <ul><li>Societies define crime as the breach of one or more rules or laws for which some governing authority or force may ultimately prescribe a punishment . </li></ul><ul><li>What constitutes a crime tends to alter according to historical, cultural and power dimensions – it is time and culture bound </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Deviance is…..? </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Crime is a rule breaking activity and occurs in a social context. </li></ul><ul><li>Deviant acts are all acts that violate the accepted standards of the community. (legal or illegal) </li></ul><ul><li>They normally incur social disapproval </li></ul>So what is ‘normal’ and ‘acceptable’ standards?
  10. 10. <ul><li>ACTIVITY </li></ul><ul><li>Crimes or deviance? </li></ul><ul><li>Pg 5 Swale </li></ul><ul><li>Context is important </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rules of dress </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speeding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eccentric behaviour </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>ACTIVITY </li></ul><ul><li>Deviance debate </li></ul>Deviance is in the eye of the beholder and who defines an act as deviant and who decides what should be illegal is what sociologists are interested in
  12. 12. What is deviant varies according to TIME PLACE POWER CULTURE WHO? TRADITION Give some examples for each segment
  13. 13. What is deviant varies according to TIME PLACE POWER CULTURE WHO? TRADITION Give some examples for each segment Homosexuality or child out of wedlock Going topless on a street or a beach Bowing, kissing or shaking hands The more powerful the group the less deviant the behaviour Adult or child drinking alcohol The further away from the norm the more deviant it is seen
  14. 14. SUMMARY <ul><li>Crime is not an easy concept to define </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Depends on factors such as </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>TIME and CULTURE </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Crime is difficult to measure because it relies on accurate recording and measuring </li></ul><ul><li>Crime is relative to the culture </li></ul><ul><li>A deviant act is any behaviour that breaks moral codes </li></ul><ul><li>A criminal act is any behaviour that breaks the laws of society </li></ul>deviance crime C&D
  15. 15. HOMEWORK <ul><li>Read handout </li></ul><ul><li>Complete table </li></ul><ul><li>Explain why the relationship between crime and deviance is not straight forward. [8] </li></ul>
  16. 16. Consider how the following forms of behaviour are deviant/non-deviant in different societies and times “ Societies create deviants by making the rules that lead to their infraction”. HOWARD BECKER Women wearing trousers Killing someone Being married to more than one person at a time Drinking Alcohol Suicide Homosexuality Historical examples Cross Cultural comparisons

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