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Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped
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Reasons Why Immigration Was Being To Be Stopped

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  • 1. Changing attitudes to immigration in the early 1920s
    • Click the picture to navigate around this exercise.
    • Read through the websites carefully. However, in most cases only the first one or two paragraphs are needed.
    • Answer the questions from the purple boxes in your jotters where appropriate, under the correct sub heading.
    • Click home or back to take you to previous slides.
    Click here to see a cartoon
  • 2. The Board says, “I hear you knocking but you can’t come in”. BACK
  • 3. The Red Scare The Dillingham Commission World War One Restrictions Before 1900 American Self interest Racism Click on a reason to find out more
  • 4. The Red Scare BACK Click here to read about the the Red Scare Click the image to enlarge Use the links on the page to answer the following: Q. What was the Red Scare in America? Q. What decade did the Red Scare disappear? Q. Why do YOU think innocent people were jailed for expressing their views in America? Click here to see a cartoon Q. Describe the cartoon. What does it tell you? Click on the picture to enlarge
  • 5. The writing on the man’s cloak says, “European Anarchist”. Click HERE to find out what anarchist or anarchy means if you are unsure. Q. How does the cartoon show that certain immigrants were a threat to America? BACK
  • 6. BACK
    • In 1919 there was a huge wave of strikes in the USA.
    • The strikers were unskilled and semi-skilled workers, many of whom were recent immigrants from Southern and eastern Europe.
    • Therefore, many people claimed that the strikes were started by revolutionary immigrants.
    Q. Describe the cartoon above. The man is Uncle Sam (He represents America). Q. What can it tell you about the reaction of people towards the strikes. Use the cartoon and information on this page.
  • 7. The Dillingham Commission BACK In 1907 the US government wanted to know more about the ‘problem of immigration’ so it set up the Dillingham Commission The Dillingham Commission discovered that since 1880 immigrants had come mainly from Southern and Eastern Europe. Click here to find out about the measures brought in in 1917 to cut immigration. Use the links to the right. Q. Who initially tries to stop the ‘1917 Act’ in 1916? Q. What ‘undesirables’ were stopped from going to America? Q. What type of test was put in place for people over 16? Q. What did the entry fee raise to? Click here to find out even more!
  • 8. Racism BACK Many Americans were WASPs. Their families had come from Northern Europe Many of these people disliked the new immigrants from Southern Europe, who were poor and often illiterate. Click here to find out about WASPs Click here to read about racism in the USA Click the pictures to enlarge Italian immigrants were some of many races that were discriminated against in America Click on the picture to see more pictures of immigrants in America
  • 9. Q. Describe the Cartoon. Q. It was published in a magazine. Look at the language used- new immigrants are described as ‘aliens’. How do you think this may influence people to dislike new immigrants? BACK
  • 10. BACK Q. Describe the picture. It appeared in an American magazine in the 1920s. Q. What evidence is there in the source to suggest that it is a racist cartoon? (Think about the caption ‘Cleaning the nest)
  • 11. Greek Immigrants Chinese Immigrants Jewish Immigrants BACK Italian Immigrants
  • 12. World War One BACK WW1 made many Americans realise that new immigrants might be more loyal to their old country and would not be ‘good’ Americans. This created problems for the ‘Melting Pot’ idea. Click here to find out more. Click the cartoon to enlarge Click here to find out about the effect of war on immigration Click here to read a Person’s view on immigration after the Great War Click the picture to read about America’s entry into World War One.
  • 13. “ My boy went off to fight for our country in the Great War but back home we had hundreds of German immigrants who said that Germany was in the right. Why should we let these traitors into our Country? If they still support their old country let them stay there”. Emily Maine, 1919. BACK Q. What attitude does Emily Maine have towards some German immigrants after the Great War? Q. How do you know she has this attitude? (What evidence is there in the source?)
  • 14. 1921 US cartoon US cartoon. 1921. Many Germans switched to British traditions after WW1. Click HERE to read information before answering the question below. Q. Describe the picture. Q. Why do you think some Germans in America switched to ‘British’ culture? BACK
  • 15. Restrictions before 1900 BACK Click the picture to enlarge Many restrictions were brought in before 1900. Click on the relevant box to read more Chinese Exclusion Act (s) Japanese Government Restrictions Click on either picture to enlarge Q. Outline the Chinese Exclusion Acts of 1882 and 1902 Q. Describe how people felt about Japanese immigrants in America
  • 16. The picture above was printed in a magazine after measures were brought in in the 1880s to try and stop immigration from the far east. The caption reads, “and still they come”. Q. How successful were the controls to immigration in the before 1900? BACK
  • 17. Look at the two pictures. Q. Describe each picture. Q. What do they tell you about people’s attitudes in America towards the Japanese immigrants? BACK
  • 18. American self interest BACK Many immigrants came to the USA looking for homes and jobs. With growing unemployment after WW1 many Americans wanted to stop immigrants competing for scarce jobs. Americans saw immigrants as a threat to their standard of living “ Anything done to improve our conditions or wages is wrecked by Italian or Polish workers who are prepared to work longer hours and for less wages” Q. Why were immigrants a threat to American standard of living? Click here to see living conditions in America. Navigate around the virtual house. Q. Describe the conditions you have seen in the link above

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