Redefining Teen Health Communications through Social Media<br />Trish Eitel, PhD & Caitlin Douglas<br />Ogilvy Public Rela...
Background<br />Historically, health education and prevention programs targeting youth relied on adult influencers as the ...
The Challenge: Teens Strive for Independence<br />Developmentally youth are at a stage where they are establishing their i...
Direct Communication is Vital to Behavior Change<br />Communicating Directly<br />Allows them to assert their independence...
More Opportunities Than Ever Before<br />Some 93% of youth (ages 12-17) are online. <br />Almost half of teens who use soc...
Social Media Offers More Direct & Effective Communication <br />Amplifying Message Credibility.<br /><ul><li>Messages spre...
Social media amplifies the power of ‘word-of-mouth’</li></ul>Improved Targeting & Heightened Personalization.  <br /><ul><...
User-interaction and feedback leads to a heightened sense of ownership of the message</li></ul>Particular Relevance for Yo...
By its nature of peer-to-peer networks, social media reduces resistance to messages increasing receptivity to  the intende...
Encouraging a Dialogue <br />From: <br />Present Info <br />to Youth<br />To:  <br />Engage Youth <br />In The Conversatio...
Encouraging a Dialogue <br />Frequent Concerns:<br />Will youth engage in inappropriate dialogue or content?<br />Will you...
Incorporating User Generated Content <br /><ul><li>Allows youth to see themselves in the context of the campaign, making c...
Authenticity of content helps credibility
Helps refresh site content – driving return visits</li></ul>64% of online teens create content online<br /> <br />39% shar...
Appropriate Presence on Social Networking Sites <br />Use social networking sites strategically, not simply to be there<br...
49,619 Friends<br />“I think what you guys are doing is great :D”<br />“Hey! U guys are really making a difference!”<br />...
Provide Applications Can Drive Campaign Forward <br />Give them something that is unique and subtly passes along the campa...
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Redefining Teen Health Communications Through Social Media Trish Eitel, Opr Final

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Redefining Teen Health Communications Through Social Media Trish Eitel, Opr Final

  1. 1. Redefining Teen Health Communications through Social Media<br />Trish Eitel, PhD & Caitlin Douglas<br />Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide<br />August 2009<br />
  2. 2. Background<br />Historically, health education and prevention programs targeting youth relied on adult influencers as the key delivery channels. <br />
  3. 3. The Challenge: Teens Strive for Independence<br />Developmentally youth are at a stage where they are establishing their identities and asserting their independence—predisposes them to resist messages communicated through adult influencers.<br />
  4. 4. Direct Communication is Vital to Behavior Change<br />Communicating Directly<br />Allows them to assert their independence and decision making<br />Powerfully influences the decisions they are making for themselves<br />Prevents any ‘reactance’ they may have when receiving messages from adults<br />Promotes campaign ‘word of mouth’ among their peers<br />
  5. 5. More Opportunities Than Ever Before<br />Some 93% of youth (ages 12-17) are online. <br />Almost half of teens who use social networks visit them <br />once a day (26%) or several times a day (22%).<br />Four out of five teens (17 million) carry a wireless device-a 40% increase since 2004. <br />Pew Internet & American Life Project: Teens and Social Media (Dec, 2007)<br />Harris Interactive: Teens: A Generation Unplugged (Sept. 2008)<br />
  6. 6. Social Media Offers More Direct & Effective Communication <br />Amplifying Message Credibility.<br /><ul><li>Messages spread by peer networks gain credibility by virtue of ‘word-of-mouth’
  7. 7. Social media amplifies the power of ‘word-of-mouth’</li></ul>Improved Targeting & Heightened Personalization. <br /><ul><li>Social media networks are tailored to speak to specific audience segments.
  8. 8. User-interaction and feedback leads to a heightened sense of ownership of the message</li></ul>Particular Relevance for Youth-Targeted Programs. <br /><ul><li>Teens are the most tech-savvy generation and have grown up with social media
  9. 9. By its nature of peer-to-peer networks, social media reduces resistance to messages increasing receptivity to the intended health message</li></li></ul><li>Using Social Media Effectively <br />
  10. 10. Encouraging a Dialogue <br />From: <br />Present Info <br />to Youth<br />To: <br />Engage Youth <br />In The Conversation<br />Increases Ownership of the Message<br />Furthers “Word of Mouth”<br />Enhances Message Credibility<br />
  11. 11. Encouraging a Dialogue <br />Frequent Concerns:<br />Will youth engage in inappropriate dialogue or content?<br />Will youth contributions skew the intended message inappropriately? <br />Will campaign sponsors lose control of the ultimate message? <br />Solution:<br />Content monitoring prevents these issues<br />Content monitoring needs to be done on a regular basis, and cannot be overly stringent to allow for transparency, or campaign messaging loses credibility<br />
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  16. 16. Incorporating User Generated Content <br /><ul><li>Allows youth to see themselves in the context of the campaign, making content more relevant to them
  17. 17. Authenticity of content helps credibility
  18. 18. Helps refresh site content – driving return visits</li></ul>64% of online teens create content online<br /> <br />39% share their own artwork, photos, stories, or videos<br /> <br />33% create or contribute on Web pages or blogs<br />*Pew Internet & American Life Project: Teens and Social Media (Dec, 2007)<br />
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  25. 25. Appropriate Presence on Social Networking Sites <br />Use social networking sites strategically, not simply to be there<br />Choose the right social networking site:<br />Myspace vs. Facebook vs. Twitter<br />Ultimate benefit: <br />Drives message forward, subtly by reinforcing norms around the campaign issue<br />Provides touch points with your audience where they already are<br />
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  29. 29. 49,619 Friends<br />“I think what you guys are doing is great :D”<br />“Hey! U guys are really making a difference!”<br />“Thank you for everything you do!”<br />
  30. 30. Provide Applications Can Drive Campaign Forward <br />Give them something that is unique and subtly passes along the campaign message they can forward along<br />Subtly amplifies the campaign message, and spreads it virally – enhancing credibility <br />
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  35. 35. Conclusions/Implications<br />To be more successful, communications initiatives targeting youth should: <br />Speak directly to youth<br />Utilize channels youth already embrace as their own<br />Social media are uniquely positioned to optimize direct communication<br />Effective social media approaches include:<br />Two way dialogue<br />User generated media<br />Strategic social networking presence<br />Applications youth can own and share<br />

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