Social Ads for Revenue Based Social, Katie Roberts, Laureate Inc - Social Fresh EAST 2014
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Social Ads for Revenue Based Social, Katie Roberts, Laureate Inc - Social Fresh EAST 2014

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Social Fresh Conference

Social Fresh Conference
http://socialfreshconference.com

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  • - Ads can have many purposes – brand awareness with nielson studies, lead gen and nurturing through customer activation, customer retention, and loyalty <br /> <br /> - While the advertising landscape is still evolving, there are many commonalities among the big 3 – facebook, twitter, linkedin <br /> <br /> - Let’s quickly review where social media amplification fits in with the overall social media strategy <br />
  • When thinking about social media, especially adveritsing, it’s easy to think about pre-funnel and top of the funnel, but the reality is that advancements in the advertising landscape allow us to drive (and measure!) performance across the entire lifecycle. <br /> <br /> Here’s a summary of a basic social media objectives profile – we have 7 business areas impacted by social media efforts, and how those efforts are spread across FB, TW, LI. <br /> <br /> While the social media strategy dictactes content and use of platform, the social advertising strategy is great dependent on the overall business objectives – what is it that we want people to do when they see the ad? <br /> <br /> In social media advertising, knowing the objectives of each post helps align the social media advertising objectives to the business objectives. <br /> <br /> Let’s quickly look at a basic social media objectives: <br />
  • Blah <br />
  • As Dr. Seuss would say, “Start at the beginning!” <br /> <br /> If you are looking to promote content, i.e., gain brand awareness, post interaction, reach, information, event registrations, engagement, then promoted content is the best route to take. <br /> <br /> For more direct response objectives, promoted content works here as well. However, there are some specific ad types that best serve the direct response engine. (DR is beyond leads/conversion – think of whole lifecycle) <br /> <br /> If you want to get fancy, there are some cool things Facebook and Twitter are doing with pixels that allow advertisers to tailor unique ads in-platform based on on- <br /> website activity. This is where neuroscience, marketing, and technology collide – and I can TOTALLY geek out on this ALL day! <br />
  • So let’s take a look at the 3 areas of focus – promoted content, direct response, and techy geeky ads – and how they work together to support business objectives across the customer lifecycle. <br />
  • Promoted content <br /> Published Page Posts <br /> Unpub Page Posts <br /> RHS <br /> Promoted accounts / Like Ads <br /> <br /> COMMENTARY: <br /> There are two general objectives of promoting content – to get people to interact with a post – this could be engagement, click thrus, watching a video, registering for an event, etc. The other general objective is to build a community following. <br /> <br /> I come from the old school community management method that you reap what you sow. If you plant top-notch seeds and tend to the garden, you’ll have a field of wildflowers and fruits no one can turn down. With that said, it’s really tough to seed and tend to the garden when you are just getting starting – either as a start-up or an established company with a brand new social media profile. For the two of you, I realize this may come with some boo’s… but advertising your community to gain fans and followers is important for down-stream algorithm maximization … and to appease the C-suite. <br /> <br /> Twitter & FB both offer the option to promote your community using “Like Ads” and “Promoted Accounts”. If you go down this route – please do not use community size as a baseline performance metric – this is NOT a business objective. It’s simply a strategy to get your community out of the starting gate. <br /> Once you are out of the starting gate, and ready to drive engagement within your community, promoted page posts are a great way to amplify the message. Many of you are probably doing this already. <br /> <br /> (fade to promoted content images) <br /> Promoted content comes in many forms – published page posts, unpublished page posts, right-hand side ads, and on Twitter – promoted tweets. <br />
  • Promoted content <br /> Published Page Posts <br /> Unpub Page Posts <br /> RHS <br /> Promoted accounts / Like Ads <br /> <br /> COMMENTARY: <br /> There are two general objectives of promoting content – to get people to interact with a post – this could be engagement, click thrus, watching a video, registering for an event, etc. The other general objective is to build a community following. <br /> <br /> I come from the old school community management method that you reap what you sow. If you plant top-notch seeds and tend to the garden, you’ll have a field of wildflowers and fruits no one can turn down. With that said, it’s really tough to seed and tend to the garden when you are just getting starting – either as a start-up or an established company with a brand new social media profile. For the two of you, I realize this may come with some boo’s… but advertising your community to gain fans and followers is important for down-stream algorithm maximization … and to appease the C-suite. <br /> <br /> Twitter & FB both offer the option to promote your community using “Like Ads” and “Promoted Accounts”. If you go down this route – please do not use community size as a baseline performance metric – this is NOT a business objective. It’s simply a strategy to get your community out of the starting gate. <br /> Once you are out of the starting gate, and ready to drive engagement within your community, promoted page posts are a great way to amplify the message. Many of you are probably doing this already. <br /> <br /> (fade to promoted content images) <br /> Promoted content comes in many forms – published page posts, unpublished page posts, right-hand side ads, and on Twitter – promoted tweets. <br />
  • Promoted content <br /> Published Page Posts <br /> Unpub Page Posts <br /> RHS <br /> Promoted accounts / Like Ads <br /> <br /> COMMENTARY: <br /> There are two general objectives of promoting content – to get people to interact with a post – this could be engagement, click thrus, watching a video, registering for an event, etc. The other general objective is to build a community following. <br /> <br /> I come from the old school community management method that you reap what you sow. If you plant top-notch seeds and tend to the garden, you’ll have a field of wildflowers and fruits no one can turn down. With that said, it’s really tough to seed and tend to the garden when you are just getting starting – either as a start-up or an established company with a brand new social media profile. For the two of you, I realize this may come with some boo’s… but advertising your community to gain fans and followers is important for down-stream algorithm maximization … and to appease the C-suite. <br /> <br /> Twitter & FB both offer the option to promote your community using “Like Ads” and “Promoted Accounts”. If you go down this route – please do not use community size as a baseline performance metric – this is NOT a business objective. It’s simply a strategy to get your community out of the starting gate. <br /> Once you are out of the starting gate, and ready to drive engagement within your community, promoted page posts are a great way to amplify the message. Many of you are probably doing this already. <br /> <br /> (fade to promoted content images) <br /> Promoted content comes in many forms – published page posts, unpublished page posts, right-hand side ads, and on Twitter – promoted tweets. <br />
  • Promoted content <br /> Published Page Posts <br /> Unpub Page Posts <br /> RHS <br /> Promoted accounts / Like Ads <br /> <br /> COMMENTARY: <br /> There are two general objectives of promoting content – to get people to interact with a post – this could be engagement, click thrus, watching a video, registering for an event, etc. The other general objective is to build a community following. <br /> <br /> I come from the old school community management method that you reap what you sow. If you plant top-notch seeds and tend to the garden, you’ll have a field of wildflowers and fruits no one can turn down. With that said, it’s really tough to seed and tend to the garden when you are just getting starting – either as a start-up or an established company with a brand new social media profile. For the two of you, I realize this may come with some boo’s… but advertising your community to gain fans and followers is important for down-stream algorithm maximization … and to appease the C-suite. <br /> <br /> Twitter & FB both offer the option to promote your community using “Like Ads” and “Promoted Accounts”. If you go down this route – please do not use community size as a baseline performance metric – this is NOT a business objective. It’s simply a strategy to get your community out of the starting gate. <br /> Once you are out of the starting gate, and ready to drive engagement within your community, promoted page posts are a great way to amplify the message. Many of you are probably doing this already. <br /> <br /> (fade to promoted content images) <br /> Promoted content comes in many forms – published page posts, unpublished page posts, right-hand side ads, and on Twitter – promoted tweets. <br />
  • Published Page Posts: Pushed by brand page/account, visible to anyone that views page/account Objectives: Engagement/interaction, click thrus, event registrations, video views, etc. <br /> <br />
  • Promoted content <br /> Published Page Posts <br /> Unpub Page Posts <br /> RHS <br /> Promoted accounts / Like Ads <br /> <br /> COMMENTARY: <br /> There are two general objectives of promoting content – to get people to interact with a post – this could be engagement, click thrus, watching a video, registering for an event, etc. The other general objective is to build a community following. <br /> <br /> I come from the old school community management method that you reap what you sow. If you plant top-notch seeds and tend to the garden, you’ll have a field of wildflowers and fruits no one can turn down. With that said, it’s really tough to seed and tend to the garden when you are just getting starting – either as a start-up or an established company with a brand new social media profile. For the two of you, I realize this may come with some boo’s… but advertising your community to gain fans and followers is important for down-stream algorithm maximization … and to appease the C-suite. <br /> <br /> Twitter & FB both offer the option to promote your community using “Like Ads” and “Promoted Accounts”. If you go down this route – please do not use community size as a baseline performance metric – this is NOT a business objective. It’s simply a strategy to get your community out of the starting gate. <br /> Once you are out of the starting gate, and ready to drive engagement within your community, promoted page posts are a great way to amplify the message. Many of you are probably doing this already. <br /> <br /> (fade to promoted content images) <br /> Promoted content comes in many forms – published page posts, unpublished page posts, right-hand side ads, and on Twitter – promoted tweets. <br />
  • Promoted content <br /> Published Page Posts <br /> Unpub Page Posts <br /> RHS <br /> Promoted accounts / Like Ads <br /> <br /> COMMENTARY: <br /> There are two general objectives of promoting content – to get people to interact with a post – this could be engagement, click thrus, watching a video, registering for an event, etc. The other general objective is to build a community following. <br /> <br /> I come from the old school community management method that you reap what you sow. If you plant top-notch seeds and tend to the garden, you’ll have a field of wildflowers and fruits no one can turn down. With that said, it’s really tough to seed and tend to the garden when you are just getting starting – either as a start-up or an established company with a brand new social media profile. For the two of you, I realize this may come with some boo’s… but advertising your community to gain fans and followers is important for down-stream algorithm maximization … and to appease the C-suite. <br /> <br /> Twitter & FB both offer the option to promote your community using “Like Ads” and “Promoted Accounts”. If you go down this route – please do not use community size as a baseline performance metric – this is NOT a business objective. It’s simply a strategy to get your community out of the starting gate. <br /> Once you are out of the starting gate, and ready to drive engagement within your community, promoted page posts are a great way to amplify the message. Many of you are probably doing this already. <br /> <br /> (fade to promoted content images) <br /> Promoted content comes in many forms – published page posts, unpublished page posts, right-hand side ads, and on Twitter – promoted tweets. <br />
  • Promoted content <br /> Published Page Posts <br /> Unpub Page Posts <br /> RHS <br /> Promoted accounts / Like Ads <br /> <br /> COMMENTARY: <br /> There are two general objectives of promoting content – to get people to interact with a post – this could be engagement, click thrus, watching a video, registering for an event, etc. The other general objective is to build a community following. <br /> <br /> I come from the old school community management method that you reap what you sow. If you plant top-notch seeds and tend to the garden, you’ll have a field of wildflowers and fruits no one can turn down. With that said, it’s really tough to seed and tend to the garden when you are just getting starting – either as a start-up or an established company with a brand new social media profile. For the two of you, I realize this may come with some boo’s… but advertising your community to gain fans and followers is important for down-stream algorithm maximization … and to appease the C-suite. <br /> <br /> Twitter & FB both offer the option to promote your community using “Like Ads” and “Promoted Accounts”. If you go down this route – please do not use community size as a baseline performance metric – this is NOT a business objective. It’s simply a strategy to get your community out of the starting gate. <br /> Once you are out of the starting gate, and ready to drive engagement within your community, promoted page posts are a great way to amplify the message. Many of you are probably doing this already. <br /> <br /> (fade to promoted content images) <br /> Promoted content comes in many forms – published page posts, unpublished page posts, right-hand side ads, and on Twitter – promoted tweets. <br />
  • UnPub Page Posts: Not published by the brand page, only served to those in the target audience <br /> This one is pretty straight forward – if the message is ONLY relevant to a very specific audience, then go with an unpub page post. You can reach your audience quickly, without bothering other community members with non-relevant content. You can do this on both Facebook and Twitter!
  • Promoted content <br /> Published Page Posts <br /> Unpub Page Posts <br /> RHS <br /> Promoted accounts / Like Ads <br /> <br /> COMMENTARY: <br /> There are two general objectives of promoting content – to get people to interact with a post – this could be engagement, click thrus, watching a video, registering for an event, etc. The other general objective is to build a community following. <br /> <br /> I come from the old school community management method that you reap what you sow. If you plant top-notch seeds and tend to the garden, you’ll have a field of wildflowers and fruits no one can turn down. With that said, it’s really tough to seed and tend to the garden when you are just getting starting – either as a start-up or an established company with a brand new social media profile. For the two of you, I realize this may come with some boo’s… but advertising your community to gain fans and followers is important for down-stream algorithm maximization … and to appease the C-suite. <br /> <br /> Twitter & FB both offer the option to promote your community using “Like Ads” and “Promoted Accounts”. If you go down this route – please do not use community size as a baseline performance metric – this is NOT a business objective. It’s simply a strategy to get your community out of the starting gate. <br /> Once you are out of the starting gate, and ready to drive engagement within your community, promoted page posts are a great way to amplify the message. Many of you are probably doing this already. <br /> <br /> (fade to promoted content images) <br /> Promoted content comes in many forms – published page posts, unpublished page posts, right-hand side ads, and on Twitter – promoted tweets. <br />
  • FACT: Facebook only serves up 1,500 pieces of content to an individual within a 24 period. This is ALL content – everything you see in your feed. The average person follows over 200 brand pages and has more than 375 friends. Calculate in the advertising units … and then solve the Pythagorean theorem.. That’s a lot of content – more than 1,500! <br /> <br /> So to make sure you see what’s post important to you as a user, Facebook uses an algorithm to determine what you see, based on your interactions. That’s still a pretty cluttered space for brands to compete for in your news feed. <br /> <br /> So to make sure you see what’s post important to you as a user, Facebook uses an algorithm to determine what you see, based on your interactions. That’s still a pretty cluttered space for brands to compete for in your news feed. <br /> <br /> In December, Facebook made a decision to update the algorithm so that (for most) 2% of brand page content is visible organically. This means people like us have to fork over the dough, if we want to get in the newsfeed. That makes our role, as marketers, to make sure we are putting the most important content with a purpose up on our pages, and sponsoring posts on it to the right, targeted audience. <br /> <br /> This is why promoted page posts on Facebook are SO important! <br />
  • This is where things start to get a little bit fancy. Yes, you can use promoted posts for direct response. But, your options are fairly limited in how you measure performance, and what you want the end user to do when they see your ad .. I mean, content.  <br /> Direct response ads, mostly fall into the category of action-based ads – either in the feed or on the right hand side. There are also offers, event registrations, and… for Twitter, lead cards. <br /> <br /> The goal of direct response ads is drive a business action – click on a link, fill out a short lead card, claim an offer, install an app. <br /> <br /> Super Important Note: We tend to think of direct response as an old school “marketing” technique that mainly touches the top of the funnel – think lead gen. <br /> As the customer lifecycle becomes more complex and social media is at the backbone of the customer engagement backbone, it’s important to think about “Direct Response” as not just limited to the top of the funnel and lead gen / lead nurturing. We should think of ways to use direct response down the funnel all the way through loyalty. <br />
  • What if there’s something really important to a customer – that could support customer retention. Or maybe it’s a contest to refer colleagues. Or maybe you’ve moved on to another product, but you still have brand loyalty and want to shout it from the rooftop? The traditional direct response concept works across the entire lifecycle! For us, in higher ed, we use DR to generate leads, of course, and to cross-sell to other universities within our university network. We also use it for student engagement – reminding of start dates, attend a refresher writing course, register for an upcoming student-only event… and then there’s graduation. We want them to join the alumni association, order a class ring, pick up their commencement tickets. We want our prospects, students, staff, faculty, and alumni to all refer friends and colleagues. That’s lead gen, sure, but the audience isn’t a top-funnel audience – the audience is widespread.
  • What if there’s something really important to a customer – that could support customer retention. Or maybe it’s a contest to refer colleagues. Or maybe you’ve moved on to another product, but you still have brand loyalty and want to shout it from the rooftop? The traditional direct response concept works across the entire lifecycle! For us, in higher ed, we use DR to generate leads, of course, and to cross-sell to other universities within our university network. We also use it for student engagement – reminding of start dates, attend a refresher writing course, register for an upcoming student-only event… and then there’s graduation. We want them to join the alumni association, order a class ring, pick up their commencement tickets. We want our prospects, students, staff, faculty, and alumni to all refer friends and colleagues. That’s lead gen, sure, but the audience isn’t a top-funnel audience – the audience is widespread.
  • Pixels help us measure what happens once someone gets to the website – how many people that clicked through a DR ad filled out a lead form? How many registered for an event? Did they watch the video you wanted them to? <br /> When you create a FB ad, you can opt to have a conversion pixel created. This pixel is placed on an “outcome page” within the website. If the DR ad sends someone to a landing page, the pixel is placed on the “thank you page” – or outcome page. When someone lands on the thank you page within the same session, the pixel is “fired”. This signals back to the FB Ad Unit that x number of forms were completed as a result of that specific ad. Whoa! <br /> (show example of ad reporting of this) <br /> This can be used in a few different applications. We use it for lead gen – it’s awesome that we know how many people clicked on a link, but how do I know if the ad actually WORKED and moved the needle? The pixel will tell me number of click thrus, and the number of completed leads per ad unit. <br /> It can also be used for other events on a website.
  • Site visit <br /> Purchase <br /> Download <br /> Sign up <br /> Custom <br /> <br /> <br /> Post-engagement attribution window <br /> Select the time window for crediting Twitter with conversions that happen after a person engages with your ads. Some examples of a user engaging with your ads can include favorites, Retweets, follows, @replys, or URL clicks on your Promoted Tweet. The options for post-engagement attribution windows are 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 days. If you’re not sure what window to select, we recommend the default setting of 14 days. If you change this setting your conversion data will be retroactively updated, so feel free to come back later and experiment with different attribution windows. <br /> Post-view attribution window <br /> “Post-view” refers to when a Twitter user sees your Promoted Tweet and does not engage with it, but later visits your website and converts. Users often see, read, and view media in your Promoted Tweets without clicking on them — including post-view attribution gives you insight into conversions you received but weren’t actually charged an engagement for. The options for post-view attribution windows are none, 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 days. If you’re not sure which setting to choose, we recommend the default of “1 day after view.” <br />
  • Site visit <br /> Purchase <br /> Download <br /> Sign up <br /> Custom <br /> <br /> <br /> Post-engagement attribution window <br /> Select the time window for crediting Twitter with conversions that happen after a person engages with your ads. Some examples of a user engaging with your ads can include favorites, Retweets, follows, @replys, or URL clicks on your Promoted Tweet. The options for post-engagement attribution windows are 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 days. If you’re not sure what window to select, we recommend the default setting of 14 days. If you change this setting your conversion data will be retroactively updated, so feel free to come back later and experiment with different attribution windows. <br /> Post-view attribution window <br /> “Post-view” refers to when a Twitter user sees your Promoted Tweet and does not engage with it, but later visits your website and converts. Users often see, read, and view media in your Promoted Tweets without clicking on them — including post-view attribution gives you insight into conversions you received but weren’t actually charged an engagement for. The options for post-view attribution windows are none, 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 days. If you’re not sure which setting to choose, we recommend the default of “1 day after view.” <br />
  • Site visit <br /> Purchase <br /> Download <br /> Sign up <br /> Custom <br /> <br /> <br /> Post-engagement attribution window <br /> Select the time window for crediting Twitter with conversions that happen after a person engages with your ads. Some examples of a user engaging with your ads can include favorites, Retweets, follows, @replys, or URL clicks on your Promoted Tweet. The options for post-engagement attribution windows are 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 days. If you’re not sure what window to select, we recommend the default setting of 14 days. If you change this setting your conversion data will be retroactively updated, so feel free to come back later and experiment with different attribution windows. <br /> Post-view attribution window <br /> “Post-view” refers to when a Twitter user sees your Promoted Tweet and does not engage with it, but later visits your website and converts. Users often see, read, and view media in your Promoted Tweets without clicking on them — including post-view attribution gives you insight into conversions you received but weren’t actually charged an engagement for. The options for post-view attribution windows are none, 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 days. If you’re not sure which setting to choose, we recommend the default of “1 day after view.” <br />
  • Continue to optimize – see which ads are performing, which aren’t, and do more of what is working <br /> Keep testing! <br /> <br /> Site visit <br /> Purchase <br /> Download <br /> Sign up <br /> Custom <br /> <br /> <br /> Post-engagement attribution window <br /> Select the time window for crediting Twitter with conversions that happen after a person engages with your ads. Some examples of a user engaging with your ads can include favorites, Retweets, follows, @replys, or URL clicks on your Promoted Tweet. The options for post-engagement attribution windows are 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 days. If you’re not sure what window to select, we recommend the default setting of 14 days. If you change this setting your conversion data will be retroactively updated, so feel free to come back later and experiment with different attribution windows. <br /> Post-view attribution window <br /> “Post-view” refers to when a Twitter user sees your Promoted Tweet and does not engage with it, but later visits your website and converts. Users often see, read, and view media in your Promoted Tweets without clicking on them — including post-view attribution gives you insight into conversions you received but weren’t actually charged an engagement for. The options for post-view attribution windows are none, 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 days. If you’re not sure which setting to choose, we recommend the default of “1 day after view.” <br />
  • Continue to optimize – see which ads are performing, which aren’t, and do more of what is working <br /> Keep testing! <br /> <br /> Site visit <br /> Purchase <br /> Download <br /> Sign up <br /> Custom <br /> <br /> <br /> Post-engagement attribution window <br /> Select the time window for crediting Twitter with conversions that happen after a person engages with your ads. Some examples of a user engaging with your ads can include favorites, Retweets, follows, @replys, or URL clicks on your Promoted Tweet. The options for post-engagement attribution windows are 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 days. If you’re not sure what window to select, we recommend the default setting of 14 days. If you change this setting your conversion data will be retroactively updated, so feel free to come back later and experiment with different attribution windows. <br /> Post-view attribution window <br /> “Post-view” refers to when a Twitter user sees your Promoted Tweet and does not engage with it, but later visits your website and converts. Users often see, read, and view media in your Promoted Tweets without clicking on them — including post-view attribution gives you insight into conversions you received but weren’t actually charged an engagement for. The options for post-view attribution windows are none, 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 days. If you’re not sure which setting to choose, we recommend the default of “1 day after view.” <br />
  • Another common direct response tool, that both twitter and facebook offer is the ability to write ads data to the website, and the website back to Facebook or Twitter using something called Pixels. <br /> Pixels help us measure what happens once someone gets to the website – how many people that clicked through a DR ad filled out a lead form? How many registered for an event? Did they watch the video you wanted them to? <br /> When you create a FB ad, you can opt to have a conversion pixel created. This pixel is placed on an “outcome page” within the website. If the DR ad sends someone to a landing page, the pixel is placed on the “thank you page” – or outcome page. When someone lands on the thank you page within the same session, the pixel is “fired”. This signals back to the FB Ad Unit that x number of forms were completed as a result of that specific ad. Whoa! <br /> (show example of ad reporting of this) <br /> This can be used in a few different applications. We use it for lead gen – it’s awesome that we know how many people clicked on a link, but how do I know if the ad actually WORKED and moved the needle? The pixel will tell me number of click thrus, and the number of completed leads per ad unit. <br /> It can also be used for other events on a website. [come up with a few more ideas] <br /> <br /> So that’s some pretty cool stuff… but I have one more magic trick for you … Facebook Exchange. This is where things get a little bit creepy from an end-user standpoint, but totally cool from an advertising standpoint. Shh, don’t tell your friends what happens behind the screen. <br /> Have you ever.. say… gone shoe shopping on an online website, then head over to FB to tell everyone about the awesome pair of shoes? If not shoes.. maybe it was a set of golf clubs or something … or in our case, a doctoral degree. Haha <br /> When you got to Facebook, you may have noticed, either off to the right or in your newsfeed, a post with the image of those same shoes! … or golf clubs …. Or degree … ! <br /> Whoa, how did they do that? How did Facebook know I really wanted those cute pink shoes with the rhinestones down the heel? And they were ON SALE! <br /> That magic trick is called Facebook Exchange. It’s mostly used for retargeting and/or shopping cart abandonment. It’s based on specific website activity and uses that nifty pixel thing again, but instead of having the pixels on a completed action page, the pixels sit on popular pages within the website (or all of the pages!). <br /> If you visit a webpage with a pixel on it, the next time you go to Facebook, you’ll be served an ad that relates to the previous webpage(s) you were on. <br /> So how does it work? <br /> (graphic of ad copy -> pixel -> target webpage -> fb login -> ad unit) <br /> Thinking of the end goal – conversion – you can go into Facebook Ads and set up a series of ads with messages centered around the content on specific page(s). Facebook will generate a pixel, and you then put the pixel on the webpage in which you want the ad to fire. As people visit that page, they’ll be served the ad on FB upon their next FB visit. <br /> Many large retailers use this quite a bit for shopping cart abandonment. For those outside of ecommerce, it’s a great took to retarget and reactive people that have visited your website, but have not taken any additional action. <br /> In addition to setting up a FBX ad, you can take a custom audience of your active leads and customer databases, and set that as an exclude from the ads. That way, only people visiting the target webpage that are not already in the database will see the ad. Boom! <br /> Just like many of the other audience targeting options, there are all kinds of uses for this beyond retargeting and shopping cart abandonment. It can be used in a contest to drive people that recently voted in a contest to come back and vote again. Another use that I’ve seen is for event registrations – I get an ad sending me to the post-webinar recording a few days after the event that I registered for goes live. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> While Facebook and Twitter have A LOT of similarities in their targeting capabilities, there are many differences. Let’s take a look at a few of the less-standard options and how to leverage for different business objectives. <br /> [quick summary] <br /> FB  demo, interests, expat, competitors, affinity, geo, grad from x school <br /> TW -> handles, interests, keywords tv shows, trending content + tv shows, geo <br /> So that gives you some pretty snazzy targeting –you can really get super niche with all of the different options … but what if you know exactly WHO on social media you want to target? Like STALK them. <br /> Enter the techy, geeky, stalking… I mean, targeting… stuff. <br />
  • Another common direct response tool, that both twitter and facebook offer is the ability to write ads data to the website, and the website back to Facebook or Twitter using something called Pixels. <br /> Pixels help us measure what happens once someone gets to the website – how many people that clicked through a DR ad filled out a lead form? How many registered for an event? Did they watch the video you wanted them to? <br /> When you create a FB ad, you can opt to have a conversion pixel created. This pixel is placed on an “outcome page” within the website. If the DR ad sends someone to a landing page, the pixel is placed on the “thank you page” – or outcome page. When someone lands on the thank you page within the same session, the pixel is “fired”. This signals back to the FB Ad Unit that x number of forms were completed as a result of that specific ad. Whoa! <br /> (show example of ad reporting of this) <br /> This can be used in a few different applications. We use it for lead gen – it’s awesome that we know how many people clicked on a link, but how do I know if the ad actually WORKED and moved the needle? The pixel will tell me number of click thrus, and the number of completed leads per ad unit. <br /> It can also be used for other events on a website. [come up with a few more ideas] <br /> <br /> So that’s some pretty cool stuff… but I have one more magic trick for you … Facebook Exchange. This is where things get a little bit creepy from an end-user standpoint, but totally cool from an advertising standpoint. Shh, don’t tell your friends what happens behind the screen. <br /> Have you ever.. say… gone shoe shopping on an online website, then head over to FB to tell everyone about the awesome pair of shoes? If not shoes.. maybe it was a set of golf clubs or something … or in our case, a doctoral degree. Haha <br /> When you got to Facebook, you may have noticed, either off to the right or in your newsfeed, a post with the image of those same shoes! … or golf clubs …. Or degree … ! <br /> Whoa, how did they do that? How did Facebook know I really wanted those cute pink shoes with the rhinestones down the heel? And they were ON SALE! <br /> That magic trick is called Facebook Exchange. It’s mostly used for retargeting and/or shopping cart abandonment. It’s based on specific website activity and uses that nifty pixel thing again, but instead of having the pixels on a completed action page, the pixels sit on popular pages within the website (or all of the pages!). <br /> If you visit a webpage with a pixel on it, the next time you go to Facebook, you’ll be served an ad that relates to the previous webpage(s) you were on. <br /> So how does it work? <br /> (graphic of ad copy -> pixel -> target webpage -> fb login -> ad unit) <br /> Thinking of the end goal – conversion – you can go into Facebook Ads and set up a series of ads with messages centered around the content on specific page(s). Facebook will generate a pixel, and you then put the pixel on the webpage in which you want the ad to fire. As people visit that page, they’ll be served the ad on FB upon their next FB visit. <br /> Many large retailers use this quite a bit for shopping cart abandonment. For those outside of ecommerce, it’s a great took to retarget and reactive people that have visited your website, but have not taken any additional action. <br /> In addition to setting up a FBX ad, you can take a custom audience of your active leads and customer databases, and set that as an exclude from the ads. That way, only people visiting the target webpage that are not already in the database will see the ad. Boom! <br /> Just like many of the other audience targeting options, there are all kinds of uses for this beyond retargeting and shopping cart abandonment. It can be used in a contest to drive people that recently voted in a contest to come back and vote again. Another use that I’ve seen is for event registrations – I get an ad sending me to the post-webinar recording a few days after the event that I registered for goes live. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> While Facebook and Twitter have A LOT of similarities in their targeting capabilities, there are many differences. Let’s take a look at a few of the less-standard options and how to leverage for different business objectives. <br /> [quick summary] <br /> FB  demo, interests, expat, competitors, affinity, geo, grad from x school <br /> TW -> handles, interests, keywords tv shows, trending content + tv shows, geo <br /> So that gives you some pretty snazzy targeting –you can really get super niche with all of the different options … but what if you know exactly WHO on social media you want to target? Like STALK them. <br /> Enter the techy, geeky, stalking… I mean, targeting… stuff. <br />
  • Another common direct response tool, that both twitter and facebook offer is the ability to write ads data to the website, and the website back to Facebook or Twitter using something called Pixels. <br /> Pixels help us measure what happens once someone gets to the website – how many people that clicked through a DR ad filled out a lead form? How many registered for an event? Did they watch the video you wanted them to? <br /> When you create a FB ad, you can opt to have a conversion pixel created. This pixel is placed on an “outcome page” within the website. If the DR ad sends someone to a landing page, the pixel is placed on the “thank you page” – or outcome page. When someone lands on the thank you page within the same session, the pixel is “fired”. This signals back to the FB Ad Unit that x number of forms were completed as a result of that specific ad. Whoa! <br /> (show example of ad reporting of this) <br /> This can be used in a few different applications. We use it for lead gen – it’s awesome that we know how many people clicked on a link, but how do I know if the ad actually WORKED and moved the needle? The pixel will tell me number of click thrus, and the number of completed leads per ad unit. <br /> It can also be used for other events on a website. [come up with a few more ideas] <br /> <br /> So that’s some pretty cool stuff… but I have one more magic trick for you … Facebook Exchange. This is where things get a little bit creepy from an end-user standpoint, but totally cool from an advertising standpoint. Shh, don’t tell your friends what happens behind the screen. <br /> Have you ever.. say… gone shoe shopping on an online website, then head over to FB to tell everyone about the awesome pair of shoes? If not shoes.. maybe it was a set of golf clubs or something … or in our case, a doctoral degree. Haha <br /> When you got to Facebook, you may have noticed, either off to the right or in your newsfeed, a post with the image of those same shoes! … or golf clubs …. Or degree … ! <br /> Whoa, how did they do that? How did Facebook know I really wanted those cute pink shoes with the rhinestones down the heel? And they were ON SALE! <br /> That magic trick is called Facebook Exchange. It’s mostly used for retargeting and/or shopping cart abandonment. It’s based on specific website activity and uses that nifty pixel thing again, but instead of having the pixels on a completed action page, the pixels sit on popular pages within the website (or all of the pages!). <br /> If you visit a webpage with a pixel on it, the next time you go to Facebook, you’ll be served an ad that relates to the previous webpage(s) you were on. <br /> So how does it work? <br /> (graphic of ad copy -> pixel -> target webpage -> fb login -> ad unit) <br /> Thinking of the end goal – conversion – you can go into Facebook Ads and set up a series of ads with messages centered around the content on specific page(s). Facebook will generate a pixel, and you then put the pixel on the webpage in which you want the ad to fire. As people visit that page, they’ll be served the ad on FB upon their next FB visit. <br /> Many large retailers use this quite a bit for shopping cart abandonment. For those outside of ecommerce, it’s a great took to retarget and reactive people that have visited your website, but have not taken any additional action. <br /> In addition to setting up a FBX ad, you can take a custom audience of your active leads and customer databases, and set that as an exclude from the ads. That way, only people visiting the target webpage that are not already in the database will see the ad. Boom! <br /> Just like many of the other audience targeting options, there are all kinds of uses for this beyond retargeting and shopping cart abandonment. It can be used in a contest to drive people that recently voted in a contest to come back and vote again. Another use that I’ve seen is for event registrations – I get an ad sending me to the post-webinar recording a few days after the event that I registered for goes live. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> While Facebook and Twitter have A LOT of similarities in their targeting capabilities, there are many differences. Let’s take a look at a few of the less-standard options and how to leverage for different business objectives. <br /> [quick summary] <br /> FB  demo, interests, expat, competitors, affinity, geo, grad from x school <br /> TW -> handles, interests, keywords tv shows, trending content + tv shows, geo <br /> So that gives you some pretty snazzy targeting –you can really get super niche with all of the different options … but what if you know exactly WHO on social media you want to target? Like STALK them. <br /> Enter the techy, geeky, stalking… I mean, targeting… stuff. <br /> <br /> <br /> Scenario: You have a database of thousands… maybe millions of names. You have their email address. You want to send them a message about a top-secret discount that only those that are “in the know” can receive. SCORE! <br /> Okay, so you really just want to nurture your database and get them to become a customer … whatever story you tell the prospect is up to you… HOW you get them there is with Custom Audiences. <br />   <br /> Using “custom audiences”, you can take the database list of names and email addresses and upload it to Facebook or Twitter. The 2 platforms will find any users with matching criteria, tell you the number of matching individuals, and create a target audience from the matched people. <br /> From there, you can queue up promoted posts, right hand side ads, direct response ads – whatever ad unit you want – and use that new custom audience as the target. <br /> Now, depending on your budget, whether or not they actually log in to the platform, and the probability of them seeing your ad, they may or may not see your ad. BUT, if you spend money, chances are they will see your ad – given they log in… That can sometimes be half the battle. <br /> Now, tie this custom audience to the magic of conversion pixels – and you can see how many people in your database filled out a reinquiry form, registered for an event, watched a video on your website, entered a contest, etc. That, my friends, in social media ROI, pipeline movement, lead activation, business performance… and smiling faces on the C-suite. <br /> So that’s pretty cool stuff, I admit. I can get lost in all of the different possibilities of customer audiences. You can use prospect database lists, customer lists, former customer lists – all to get their attention and hopefully act on the message. <br /> (lookalike scenario example) <br /> So what about top-funnel? Okay, okay … there’s skin in the game for the top-funnel, too. Another type of FB custom audiences is called a Lookalike audience. This can take any of your database lists – prospects, customers, former customers – and your fans – and create a list of people on Facebook that are similar. <br /> Let’s say you have a top-customer list – and you want to find more people like them. Ooh! <br /> Take the customer list and upload it to Facebook. Facebook does it’s magic and identifies an audience of people with similar profiles to those on your customer list, and creates an advertising target audience for you. Boom! <br /> Now, serve up direct response ads to drive them to your website to learn more and fill out a lead gen form, drop some conversion pixels on your thank you page, and you now know how many leads were generated by targeting people with social media profiles similar to your top-customers. Most Business Intelligence teams can’t even give you that kind of data. This is TRULY one of the more powerful advertising options that facebook offers, and the uses are literally endless. And with an audience opportunity of about 1.28 billion users – that’s kind of amazing. <br />
  • While there are many different objectives of social media advertising / amplification, the important takeaway is to make sure you have a plan in place. Have a goal, know your objectives, leverage specific targeting to drill down to specific individuals, and understand how the ads will impact business performance … and report on that performance. Use social media with a purpose; leverage social media ads with action. <br />

Social Ads for Revenue Based Social, Katie Roberts, Laureate Inc - Social Fresh EAST 2014 Social Ads for Revenue Based Social, Katie Roberts, Laureate Inc - Social Fresh EAST 2014 Presentation Transcript

  • 7/20/2014 © 2012 Laureate Education, Inc. | Confidential & Proprietary Social Media for Business ROI Social Fresh 2014 By: Katie B. Roberts Let’s Connect Tweet me: @KatieBRoberts #KBRSocial Facebook: /Katie.B.Roberts Linkedin: /KatieBRoberts Email: katie.roberts@waldenu.edu
  • Social Media for Business ROI
  • Social Media channels support the entire customer lifecycle: – Awareness – Engagement & Consideration – Conversion & Activation – Brand Loyalty & Retention – Customer Servicing Social Media for Business ROI Identifying lifecycle stages that social media can impact
  • 7/20/2014 © 2012 Laureate Education, Inc. | Confidential & Proprietary 4 Strategic Goals Social Media Channels Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pages/Groups Google+ Blog YouTube Pinterest StrategicGoals Engagement ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Customer Retention & Loyalty ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Brand Awareness ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Lead Gen ● ● ● ● ● Referrals ● ● ● ● ● Conversion / Activation ● ● ● ● ● ● Social Media for Business ROI
  • Social Media for Business ROI Where to start? YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE GREAT TO START, BUT YOU HAVE TO START TO BE GREAT -zig zagler
  • Social Media for Business ROI 3 Areas of Focus Drive Engage- ment Increase Brand Aware- ness/ Reach Generate Leads Support Conversion Efforts Customer Loyalty Customer Servicing Promoted Content Direct Response Customer Audience
  • Social Media for Business ROI Promoted Content Promoted Account Published Promoted Posts Unpublished Promoted Posts
  • Social Media for Business ROI Promoted Content Promoted Account Published Promoted Posts Unpublished Promoted Posts When to Use • Community Growth • New brad, new to social media • High-level brand awareness Facebook Promoted Account Twitter Promoted Account
  • Social Media for Business ROI Promoted Content Promoted Account Published Promoted Posts Unpublished Promoted Posts When to Use • Community Growth • New brand, new to social media • High-level brand awareness Twitter Promoted Account
  • Social Media for Business ROI Promoted Content Promoted Account Published Promoted Posts Unpublished Promoted Posts Key Takeaway • Use only for early growth of community • Do not use as a business objective • Growth with brand target demographic
  • Social Media for Business ROI Promoted Content Promoted Account Published Promoted Posts Unpublished Promoted Posts When to Use • Increase brand awareness of published posts • Drive brand engagement • Reach key target audience that includes fans Facebook Promoted Page Post
  • Social Media for Business ROI Promoted Content Promoted Account Published Promoted Posts Unpublished Promoted Posts Facebook Promoted Page Post
  • Social Media for Business ROI Promoted Content Promoted Account Published Promoted Posts Unpublished Promoted Posts When to Use • Increase brand awareness of published posts • Drive brand engagement • Reach key target audience that includes fans Twitter Promoted Tweet
  • Social Media for Business ROI Promoted Content Promoted Account Published Promoted Posts Unpublished Promoted Posts Key Takeaway • Drive engagement with fans & target audiences • Effective amplification strategy
  • Social Media for Business ROI Promoted Content Promoted Account Published Promoted Posts Unpublished Promoted Posts When to Use • Audience-specific post, not limited to fans • Drive brand engagement, direct response, activation • Deliver messages at any stage of lifecycle independent of brand page community composition
  • Social Media for Business ROI Promoted Content Promoted Account Published Promoted Posts Unpublished Promoted Posts Key Takeaway • Flexibility in visibility beyond fans and followers • Effective amplification and action-centric strategy • “20% text” rule (FB) still applies • Be cautious of number of posts in ads queue for overlapping audience members
  • Social Media for Business ROI Facebook Fast Fact 150 0 1500 1500
  • Social Media for Business ROI Direct Response Website Traffic Website Conversions Offer Claims
  • Social Media for Business ROI Website Traffic When to Use • Drive traffic to a specific page on website • Brand awareness, funnel movement • Action-oriented beyond a single click Twitter Promoted Account Website Traffic Website Conversions Offer Claims
  • Social Media for Business ROI Website Traffic Website Traffic Website Conversions Offer Claims
  • Social Media for Business ROI Website Conversions When to Use • Promote a specific action on a website • Lead Gen, Retarget, Enter Contest, Event Registration • Use of Conversion Pixels Account Website Traffic Website Conversions Offer Claims
  • Social Media for Business ROI Website Conversions Website Traffic Website Conversions Offer Claims
  • Social Media for Business ROI Website Conversions Website Traffic Website Conversions Offer Claims
  • Social Media for Business ROI Website Conversions Website Traffic Website Conversions Offer Claims
  • Social Media for Business ROI Website Conversions Website Traffic Website Conversions Offer Claims
  • Social Media for Business ROI Offers Website Traffic Website Conversions Offer Claims When to Use • Providing a discount or offer • Tracking number of discounts used • Brand awareness, lead gen, activation, retention Account
  • Social Media for Business ROI Unique audience opportunities Custom Audience Lookalike Audience .
  • Custom Audience Lookalike Audience . Social Media for Business ROI Unique audience opportunities
  • Custom Audience Lookalike Audience . Social Media for Business ROI Unique audience opportunities When to Use • Explore new targeting opportunities • Create new segment clusters • Leverage social media profiles similar to successful customer profiles
  • Social Media for Business ROI
  • • Promoted Accounts: Good for emerging communities focused on community growth to get out of the starting gate • Promoted Content: Excellent at driving engagement, inbound performance, entire-lifecycle activation • Direct Response: advertising with a purpose, move the needle. Think past the top of the funnel. • Targeting: There are 1.28 billion people on facebook, nearly 650 million on Twitter. Don’t be noise. Have purpose. Reach the right people with specific targeting • Custom Audiences: Work smarter, not harder. Use the databases you have to nurture and define new audiences • Facebook Exchange: Find a way to use it. It works. Social Media for Business ROI Key Takeaways
  • QUESTIONS? Tweetme: @KatieBRoberts #KBRSocial Facebook:/Katie.B.Roberts Linkedin: /KatieBRoberts Email: katie.roberts@waldenu.edu