<ul><li>Encouraging engagement with the  </li></ul><ul><li>provision of emotional competency  </li></ul><ul><li>coaching f...
Defining Intelligence <ul><li>Traditionally, intelligence (IQ), has been defined, measured  </li></ul><ul><li>and understo...
Emotional Intelligence <ul><li>‘ Broadly speaking emotional intelligence addresses  </li></ul><ul><li>the emotional, perso...
Overview <ul><li>Research conducted with a sample of first year  </li></ul><ul><li>entrants to ITB in the academic year 20...
The Bar-On EQ-i Composite scale Sub-scale Interpersonal Empathy Social Responsibility Social Relationships Intrapersonal S...
Quantitative element <ul><li>The quantitative element of this research aimed to assess  </li></ul><ul><li>the impact of em...
Principle quantitative findings <ul><li>Emotional competency coaching led to statistically higher EI scores for four of th...
Issues <ul><li>Statistical analysis was hampered by: </li></ul><ul><li>Low participation rates in subject areas other than...
Qualitative element <ul><li>The qualitative element of this research had  </li></ul><ul><li>two principle aims: </li></ul>...
Methodology (Qualitative) <ul><li>Twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted with non-participating first year stude...
<ul><li>Five themes were explored with interviewees. </li></ul><ul><li>Theme one:  Students understanding of the term ‘Emo...
Theme one: Students understanding of EI. <ul><li>Non-participation was not due to a failure to understand what EI is, or w...
Student quotes – theme one. Maybe like to help the needs of other people’  (Social care  student two) I suppose the first ...
Theme two: The perceived value of developing EI. <ul><li>A majority of participants believe that introducing  </li></ul><u...
Student quotes – The value of developing EI. ‘ If you’re trying to get new contracts.  If you’re trying to close a deal’  ...
Theme three – Reasons for non-engagement. <ul><li>Time/workload pressures. </li></ul><ul><li>Failing initially to apprecia...
Student quotes – Theme three. I’m not ready to find out what my EI is.  I’d be scared if I’m like, too low or too high or…...
Theme four – The best means of introducing EI into the third-level curriculum. <ul><li>EI should be prioritised and should...
Theme four – Student quotes. ‘ I think it would be very good if it was mandatory.’   (Business student one). ‘ I think if ...
Theme five:  The factors which participants believe impact their ability to learn. <ul><li>Students were asked to name the...
In summary….. <ul><li>Students have a good understanding of EI. </li></ul><ul><li>Students see the relevance of focusing o...
The National Framework of Qualifications (NFQ) Category Sub-strand Knowledge Breadth Kind Know-how and skill Range Selecti...
Proposed changes to the NFQ Category Sub-strand Knowledge Breadth Kind Know-how and skill Range Selectivity Procedural com...
Proposed changes – Interpersonal skills   Level 1 Level 2 Level 3  Level 4 Level 5  Social Competence – Interpersonal skil...
Proposed changes – Intrapersonal skills   Level 1 Level 2 Level 3  Level 4 Level 5  Social Competence – Intrapersonal skil...
Questions? <ul><li>?   </li></ul>
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Encouraging engagement with the provision of emotional competency coaching for first year undergraduate students, aiden carty, ait

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Encouraging engagement with the
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coaching for first year undergraduate
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Encouraging engagement with the provision of emotional competency coaching for first year undergraduate students, aiden carty, ait

  1. 1. <ul><li>Encouraging engagement with the </li></ul><ul><li>provision of emotional competency </li></ul><ul><li>coaching for first year undergraduate </li></ul><ul><li>students. </li></ul><ul><li>Athlone (March 2011) </li></ul><ul><li>Aiden Carthy </li></ul>
  2. 2. Defining Intelligence <ul><li>Traditionally, intelligence (IQ), has been defined, measured </li></ul><ul><li>and understood as: </li></ul><ul><li>‘… the measurement of one’s ability to learn, recall, apply, </li></ul><ul><li>think, reason and abstract.’ (Bar-on 2002) </li></ul><ul><li>More recently however, a number of theorists have </li></ul><ul><li>examined non-cognitive aspects of learning and intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>and argue that such traditional definitions are somewhat </li></ul><ul><li>limiting. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Emotional Intelligence <ul><li>‘ Broadly speaking emotional intelligence addresses </li></ul><ul><li>the emotional, personal, social and survival dimensions </li></ul><ul><li>of intelligence, what are often more important for daily </li></ul><ul><li>functioning than the more traditional cognitive aspects </li></ul><ul><li>of intelligence .’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ In a way, to measure EI, is to measure one’s </li></ul><ul><li>“ Common Sense” and ability to get along in the world.’ </li></ul><ul><li>(Bar-on 2002) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Overview <ul><li>Research conducted with a sample of first year </li></ul><ul><li>entrants to ITB in the academic year 2009 – </li></ul><ul><li>2010. </li></ul><ul><li>A mixed methods research design involving </li></ul><ul><li>both quantitative and qualitative elements. </li></ul><ul><li>Test employed was the Bar-On EQ-i. </li></ul>
  5. 5. The Bar-On EQ-i Composite scale Sub-scale Interpersonal Empathy Social Responsibility Social Relationships Intrapersonal Self-Regard Emotional Self Awareness Assertiveness Self Actualisation Independence Stress Management Stress Tolerance Impulse Control Adaptability Reality Testing Flexibility Problem Solving General Mood Optimism Happiness
  6. 6. Quantitative element <ul><li>The quantitative element of this research aimed to assess </li></ul><ul><li>the impact of emotional competency coaching on students </li></ul><ul><li>academic attainment. </li></ul><ul><li>Specifically, the variables that were measured were: </li></ul><ul><li>Grade point averages. </li></ul><ul><li>Attrition rates. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Principle quantitative findings <ul><li>Emotional competency coaching led to statistically higher EI scores for four of the five composite scale scores and twelve of the fifteen sub-scale scores. </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional competency coaching did not impact on GPA. </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional competency did impact attrition rates – students that attended for coaching were statistically less likely to drop out than students that did not. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Issues <ul><li>Statistical analysis was hampered by: </li></ul><ul><li>Low participation rates in subject areas other than social care. </li></ul><ul><li>Drop out – many students failed to present for coaching. The study began with 304 students and ended with 80. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Qualitative element <ul><li>The qualitative element of this research had </li></ul><ul><li>two principle aims: </li></ul><ul><li>To explore students understanding of the term ‘emotional competency’. </li></ul><ul><li>To investigate the reasons non-participating students chose not to engage with the opportunity to avail of emotional competency coaching. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Methodology (Qualitative) <ul><li>Twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted with non-participating first year students, as follows: </li></ul><ul><li>n = 6 Business </li></ul><ul><li>n = 6 Engineering </li></ul><ul><li>n = 7 Social care </li></ul><ul><li>n = 1 Computing </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Five themes were explored with interviewees. </li></ul><ul><li>Theme one: Students understanding of the term ‘Emotional Intelligence’. </li></ul><ul><li>Theme two: The perceived value of developing emotional intelligence with respect to educational and career development . </li></ul><ul><li>Theme three: Reasons for non-engagement with the quantitative element of this research. </li></ul><ul><li>Theme four: Encouraging engagement – thoughts concerning the best means of introducing emotional intelligence into the third level academic curriculum. </li></ul><ul><li>Theme five: The factors which participants believe impact their ability to learn. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Theme one: Students understanding of EI. <ul><li>Non-participation was not due to a failure to understand what EI is, or why it is important in an educational context. </li></ul><ul><li>Social care students were more likely to mention interpersonal aspects of EI and helping others, than students from all other disciplines. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Student quotes – theme one. Maybe like to help the needs of other people’ (Social care student two) I suppose the first word would be empathy and seeing things from another person’s perspective. Imagining how it would feel for them if you were in that situation and the event happened to you.’ (Social care student six ) ‘ Ethical issues, social issues’ (Social care student three). If I was to sum it up, I would guess it would be personal emotions or form of body language.’ (Engineering student six).
  14. 14. Theme two: The perceived value of developing EI. <ul><li>A majority of participants believe that introducing </li></ul><ul><li>EI coaching into the third level curriculum is of </li></ul><ul><li>value not only educationally but also with respect </li></ul><ul><li>to work practise and personal development. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Student quotes – The value of developing EI. ‘ If you’re trying to get new contracts. If you’re trying to close a deal’ (Business student four). ‘… EI I believe would have something to do with you being happy with yourself and then being happy makes you work better because there’s less stress and less pressure…’ (Engineering student five). ‘ If you don’t understand a lecturer or a lecturer doesn’t understand you, you could improve that and get along with the lecturer.’ (Engineering student three).
  16. 16. Theme three – Reasons for non-engagement. <ul><li>Time/workload pressures. </li></ul><ul><li>Failing initially to appreciate the value EI. </li></ul><ul><li>Fear that engagement would highlight emotional weaknesses. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Student quotes – Theme three. I’m not ready to find out what my EI is. I’d be scared if I’m like, too low or too high or…’. (Social care student one). I didn’t have the time. I would have engaged with it. At the top of my list of priorities at the time was exams, dealing with the exams’ (Computing student one). ‘‘ I’m kind of afraid.’ (Business student four). ‘ It’s like at that time I didn’t have much knowledge, but now I know I need to do these things because it’s important to know myself before I go involve myself with other people.’ (Social Care student two).
  18. 18. Theme four – The best means of introducing EI into the third-level curriculum. <ul><li>EI should be prioritised and should be a mandatory component of the curriculum. </li></ul><ul><li>EI should be introduced in first year, however there was disagreement as to when. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Theme four – Student quotes. ‘ I think it would be very good if it was mandatory.’ (Business student one). ‘ I think if it was explained more and we got an idea of what it should have been and how important it was, I think people would have taken it more seriously…’ (Engineering student four). ‘ Really, if you haven’t got EI in first year, you’re going to really drop out. ’ (Business student three).
  20. 20. Theme five: The factors which participants believe impact their ability to learn. <ul><li>Students were asked to name the three factors which they believe most impact their ability to learn. </li></ul><ul><li>15/20 students named aspects of EI as follows: </li></ul><ul><li>Thirteen students specifically mentioned a key component of EI e.g. motivation, stress management. </li></ul><ul><li>A further two students referred to ‘goal setting’, which can be considered a related aspect. </li></ul>
  21. 21. In summary….. <ul><li>Students have a good understanding of EI. </li></ul><ul><li>Students see the relevance of focusing on EI. </li></ul><ul><li>EI should be included in the curriculum. </li></ul><ul><li>EI should be mandatory. </li></ul><ul><li>Detractors from engagement are: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Perceived high workload. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Failing to appreciate the value of EI. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Fear that engagement will highlight </li></ul><ul><li>weaknesses. </li></ul>
  22. 22. The National Framework of Qualifications (NFQ) Category Sub-strand Knowledge Breadth Kind Know-how and skill Range Selectivity Competence Context Role Learning to learn Insight
  23. 23. Proposed changes to the NFQ Category Sub-strand Knowledge Breadth Kind Know-how and skill Range Selectivity Procedural competence Context Role Learning to learn Social competence Interpersonal skills Intrapersonal skills
  24. 24. Proposed changes – Interpersonal skills   Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Social Competence – Interpersonal skills Begin to demonstrate awareness of the emotions of others Demonstrate awareness of the emotions of others Effectively communicate one’s emotional state to peers or colleagues Begin to develop and maintain healthy interpersonal relationships Demonstrate the capacity to develop and maintain healthy interpersonal relationships Level 6 Level 7 Level 8 Level 9 Level 10 Social Competence – Interpersonal skills Begin to work cooperatively, considerately and constructively in social groups Work cooperatively, considerately and constructively in social groups Display the capacity to adjust emotional responses to changing situations and conditions Scrutinise and reflect on social norms and relationships and act to change them Scrutinise and reflect on social norms and relationships and lead action to change them
  25. 25. Proposed changes – Intrapersonal skills   Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Social Competence – Intrapersonal skills Begin to exercise emotional self awareness and formulate independent role for self Exercise emotional self awareness and formulate independent role for self Assume limited responsibility for consistency of self-understanding and behaviour and the exercising of impulse control Assume partial responsibility for consistency of self-understanding and behaviour and the exercising of impulse control Assume full responsibility for consistency of self-understanding and behaviour and the exercising of impulse control Level 6 Level 7 Level 8 Level 9 Level 10 Social Competence – Intrapersonal skills Express an internalised personal world view Express a comprehensive internalised personal world view Recognise and respond appropriately to symptoms of mental stress Display emotional resiliency and the ability to take preventative measures to minimise potential future stress Lead action to promote healthy intrapersonal development in professional contexts
  26. 26. Questions? <ul><li>? </li></ul>

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