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Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy
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Sin eng-10 - clean & tidy

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  • 1. Raffles Institution Year 2 Research EducationDesign For Change School Challenge 2011 Team Leader: Tommy Ong (2I) Team Members: Eric Zhao (2I) Benedict Ng (2I) Deng Jinyang (2I) Teacher-Mentor: Mr Leon Lai 1
  • 2. AcknowledgementWe would like to express our gratitude to all those who gave me the possibility to complete thisresearch. Firstly, we would like to thank Mr Sarkkunan, without whose support the interviewwould not have been possible. We are deeply indebted to our teacher-mentor, Mr. Leon Lai, fromPhilosophy Department, whose help, stimulating suggestions and encouragement had helped usin all the time of research for and writing of report by looking every piece of our work carefully aswell as correcting both English style and grammar, at the same time offering precioussuggestions for improvement.We are also bound to thank the Year Ones whose unwavering support had helped us to makeour implementation of plans a success and most certainly our former RE classmates supportedus in our research work. We want to thank them for all their help, support, interest and valuablehints.Especially, we would like to give our special thanks to our parents whose patience andunderstanding with us as we worked long hours into the night was very helpful. 2
  • 3. Table of contents1. Introduction 1.1 – Context 4 1.2 – Objectives 4 1.3 - Why Design For Change? 52. Background research 73. Preparation for Action Week 3.1 - Work Allocation 8 3.2 - Target Group 8 3.3 - Observation of Classrooms 8 3.4 - Social Survey 10 3.5 - Interview 13 3.6 – Analysis of Results 144. Our Action Week 165. Reflections 5.1 - Our Learning Journey 21 5.2 - Our Thoughts 216. Bibliography 24 3
  • 4. Section 1: Introduction1.1 Context of our Design For Change ProjectWhen we are still brainstorming the theme of focus for the project, we observed thatmany classrooms we had entered are very dirty, with a lot rubbish like tissue papers,erasers, empty discarded plastic bottles (mostly for isotonic drinks), sweet wrappers, etc.Upon closer inspection, there is a general trend that most of these rubbish are related tofood and drinks, although they are banned in class. Nevertheless, the dirty state of theclassroom are not due to the cleaners not cleaning the classrooms or whatsoever—thecleaners clean every classroom at least one everyday.That, it can only be explained that the students are not taking good care of theirclassrooms at all, and that’s why they litter all over the classroom.This problem poses an obstruction to learning. Due to the fact that every classroom isair-conditioned, its doors has to be closed, allowing little or no air-ventilation. Thus, thesmell from certain discarded rubbish gets trapped in the classroom. Sometimes, thesmell remains in the classroom for more than 8 months.This smell often hinders the students’ learning process by distracting the students awayfrom the lesson. One example is that the classroom we go for Research Education has adurian smell, which some of us find unacceptable, and thus are often distracted fromconcentrating on the teacher’s instructions.Besides, certain teachers want a clean classroom before start teaching. As a result,certain periods of the lesson time has to be allocated into cleaning the classrooms.Whereas the lesson time is fixed, the time for the actual impart of knowledge fromteachers to their students is greatly reduced, hence limiting the amount of knowledge thestudents can receive.We find this problem of students littering too much rubbish in their classrooms with manydisadvantages and thus, disturbing. That is why we want to make a change, a difference,an improvement.1.2 Objective of Design For ChangeAs a RE group whose theme is Design For Change, we wanted to abolish the conditionsstated above and thus provide, a more condusive learning environment for the students,which does not hinder their process of learning. The best solution to this is none otherthan a one which solve the root cause: Students not taking care their classrooms. Andthat’s to ingratiate a sense of belonging to the their classrooms into the students. Thusthey would automatically stop littering and take care of their classrooms’ cleanliness,hence the tendency for students to litter is greatly reduced.The proposed solution is to let the students clean their own classrooms during ProtectedInteraction Time so as to achieve our goal of bonding the students with their own 4
  • 5. classrooms. Nevertheless, some students may object to this idea since they may be lazyto do cleaning themselves. However, in the long run, they will start having the idea ofthemselves having to take care of their classrooms so that they do not have to labor sohard while cleaning their classrooms. But, in an even longer run, the students will startloving their classrooms, treat it as if it is their second home and begin taking care of it bynot littering. Besides, this activity would also help to further the bond between the class,lessen the cleaners’ burden, nurture a sense of responsibility in students, but these arenot the main point yet.In this project, we want to keep the area of focus small, by just carrying this activity out inone to two Year One classes, (which are selected upon the extent of their classroomsbeing dirty, the two most dirty classes would be selected)based on the following reasons:1) PIT is just twice per week, and the group has only four members, thus two is the mostappropriate number to observe each class, hence only a most of 2 classes can carry outthis activity.2) Currently, Year One will have the longest time to stay in RI, thus the benefit isstretched to the biggest extent.3) Assumption: Since Year One is the youngest students in school, they should be thegroup which is the easiest to be changed.4) To maximise the benefits of this project, the two most dirty classes have to beselected to be changed.1.3 Why Design For Change?Many people have asked our group, the reason for which we have chosen to do DFC. Itseems perfectly commonsensical for one to choose a RE project which makes our lifeeasy. Why would we want to choose such a project and put ourselves through thehardship of having to implement social change? In many people’s eyes, 14-years-oldchildren do not exactly seem to be the best candidates to help improve social issues.Less so, if they are Singaporeans. Even less so, if they are Rafflesians. This is becausemany people, including Singaporeans ourselves have a notion that children are toopampered and thus cannot take any hardship. Therefore, we are not normally seen aspeople who would choose a social change project.What they dont know, is that dreams are magic. They allow our spirits to shine, and theyreflect our uniqueness and authenticity. As we grow and mature, we are inundated bythe ideology of people that call for us to get our heads out of the clouds and come downto earth and that ask us to stop dreaming dreams simply because they will never cometrue. Sometimes these voices come from others, and sometimes they come fromourselves from our maturity. Our maturity comes at a price; we underestimate the powerand possibility that life is the act of dreaming what can be and that we all have to do thework it takes to make our dreams a reality.What they dont know, is that social change is not really that hard if we put our hearts toit. It is all in our hands, all it takes are our hands to start the ball rolling. It is only ourheart and our mind stopping us. Never fear anything which seems impossible, becausedreams guide us to do things which we are passionate about. 5
  • 6. The day we decided to embark on this project was the day we let our dreams take flight.Our dream might be small, literally small-scale, but we hope to touch the RI Batch of2014 with our humble dream.inspired by [ (Magsamen, 2009)] 6
  • 7. 2. Background Research - CredibilityIn Singapore, education takes up a large part of our childhood and youth. From thetender age of 6 to a young adult of 18 or 19, we learn. we learn in our schools, beingtaught by our teachers and being led the way. And the area in which our learning iscarried out is our classrooms. Of course, our classroom cleanliness is essential for amore cohesive learning experience. On February 16 2011, The Procter & GambleCompany released a survey carried out by them, where they surveyed 1000 teachers.Out of these 1000 teachers, 94% believed that students learn better in cleanerenvironments. (CINCINNATI, 2011) Evidently, teachers also place a great emphasis onthe teaching environment around them. In the same survey, 51% of teachers reportavoiding certain in-class activities as they are scared of the clean-ups. This wouldseverely impact the interactive learning of students. (CINCINNATI, 2011)As we can see from the above evidence, our classroom environment is extremelyimportant for our learning and development. The fact that Raffles Institution is a premierinstitution in Singapore makes it all the more important that we uphold a certain highstandard of cleanliness in our classrooms to facilitate learning. We often rely on theschool’s cleaners to clean our classrooms for us, but we believe that it is time for thestudent body to step up and take responsibility for their own classroom and indirectly,their learning.After we decided to focus on the cleanliness of classrooms, we decided to narrow ourscope down to the Year 1s as they are new to the school. We stayed back after schoolfor a few afternoons and checked out their classrooms before the cleaners came in. Toour dismay, their chairs were in utter disarray and litter was strewn all over the floor.Pieces of paper had imprints of feet all over them. What was needed to clear the messwas just for one person to take an effort to pick up these paper and throw them away inthe dustbin.As such, we set about brainstorming ways in which we could educate the value ofclassroom cleanliness in Year 1s. One idea that we came up with was that theclassrooms remain uncleaned for a whole week and at the end of that week, we allowthe students to clean up their own classrooms. In this way, we could allow the studentsto experience learning in a dirty classroom and from that experience, learn theimportance of maintaining the cleanliness of their classrooms.We got this solution because we wanted to instill a sense of responsibility in the studentsand even after our Design For Change project was over, such simple actions couldcontinue on the classes’ own accord. Even if we have only impacted a few classes, wehave still made a change, one small step at a time. 7
  • 8. 3. Preparation for Action Week – Methodology3.1 Work allocationBenedict and Tommy did background research on the topic to give us a generalfoundation to base our project on. Every group member was involved in coming up withthe interview and survey questions. Eric took the photos of the classrooms for both yearone classes and our own class, as well as sending out and interpreting the interview.Jinyang and Tommy gave out the survey forms.3.2 Target groupWe could only pick out a few classes to conduct our project on, since we could notpossibly extend our project to every single class due to manpower and time constraints.With only four people and seven days, we eventually decided to select three classesfrom the year ones cohort aside from our class to focus on. We decided to spend oneday to give out leaflets to year one classes, three days to improve our own class’sawareness and effort towards keeping our classroom clean, and the remaining threedays to talk to three different year one classes on keeping the classroom clean.3.3 Observation of classroomsPhotos of year 1 classrooms were taken to see which classes were the least clean andtidy. Photos were taken from all 15 year one classes and were then compared to seewhich were the least clean and tidy. Although this may not be a hundred percentaccurate, it was a fair representation of a classroom and we used the information to pickout the three target year one classes. We only took one or two photos of each classroom,and they do not show every piece of litter or disorganized tables and chairs, but ratheronly the angle that could capture the most problems was chosen and the pictures weretaken this way.On the next page are actual photos taken of the three classes, 1F, 1I and 1K: 8
  • 9. There was paper lying on the floor of class 1F. There were also other items found lyingaround (photos below only show some areas):In class 1I, the tables were quite messy and the photo shows a PE shirt, an empty file onthe floor and others(photo does not show other small objects):In class 1K, there were objects in the middle of the classroom. 9
  • 10. 3.4 Social SurveyOur team conducted a social survey on RI students to find out the perception of RIstudents towards their own classrooms and how it could be improved best. Respondentsbetween year 1 and two were asked on their personal opinions on the state of theirclassrooms, how it affected them personally, their degree of reliance on school cleaners,their opinions on school cleaners cleaning up their classrooms as well as how they feltthe situation could be improved. The survey was designed to help us develop plans forour poster for Action Week as well as how we would try to persuade the students in ourscope to keep their classrooms clean and tidy.Our actual survey form is on the next page. 10
  • 11. Raffles Institution Research Education We are students from class 2I and we are doing a project to investigate the condition and possible improvements of cleanliness in classrooms. Your responses will help us understand the students’ perception of classroom cleanliness in RI and how it can be improved best.Which class are you from? _____On a scale of 1 to 5, how clean and neat do you perceive your classroom to be?(1 being very dirty and messy and 5 being very neat and tidy) ___Do any of your classmates consume any of the following in class? (You may tickin more than one box) Food (from canteen) Food (from home) Sweetened drinks bought from canteen Sweetened drinks brought from home.If you have ticked two or more boxes, then which kind of food is consumed withthe highest frequency?___________________In your opinion, which kind of consumed food (Snacks, sandwiches, sweets etc)is causing the greatest problem to the maintenance of classroom cleanliness?___________________How much are you affected when your classroom is unclean? (1 being notaffected at all and 5 feeling extremely uncomfortable) ___Do you think a clean classroom is important as a learning environment? (1 beingnot important at all and 5 being very important) 11
  • 12. Do you think the school is doing enough to ensure that our classrooms are clean? Yes No NeutralIn your opinion, do you feel that our cleaners are doing a good job in cleaning upour classrooms? Yes No NeutralWhich of the following activities do you think would be the most effective inimproving the state of classrooms? Students briefly cleaning classrooms once a week Students briefly cleaning their classrooms twice a week Having a competition for the cleanest classWhat suggestions do you have to improve the cleanliness of classrooms? (Thisis an open-ended question)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Thank you for your patience in answering this questionnaire. Your responses are greatly appreciated. 12
  • 13. 3.5 InterviewIn order to hear about teachers’ opinions on classroom cleanliness, weconducted an interview with Mr Sarkkunan, a teacher currently teaching inRI. Mr Sarkkunan teaches physical education, which is conducted outside theclassroom, but he also conducts lesson in class in his other roles and his duty asthe form teacher of a year 1 class. This can suitably reflect the opinions ofteachers in Raffles Institution on the state of classrooms, especially a PE teacherwho would usually be more active in engaging students and therefore wouldbetter understand the psychology of students.Our group asked Mr Sarkkunan about how he felt about the level of cleanlinessof RI classrooms and how important he felt a clean and tidy learning environmentwas. We also asked him for suggestions as to how to improve the state ofclassrooms as well as how the year 1 students might respond to our campaign. 13
  • 14. 3.6 Analysis of resultsSocial SurveyOur social survey yielded some important results. Firstly, we realised thatdifferent students had very different interpretations of their own classroom, eventhough they were from the same class. The students were also affected byvarying degrees by their classroom environment. We could thus infer that thereare a wide range of attitudes across students in a class, and thus those who careless about classroom cleanliness and tidyness or who are more accustomed to adirty and untidy classroom do less to take care of their classroom. This, however,has an impact on the many who are affected greatly by the level of tidyness andcleanliness of their classroom. This difference in opinion is thus a problem thatshould be solved.We found out that food brought from home was the most common foodconsumed in the classroom, followed by food brought from the canteen. Also, wefound out that students feel that the school cleaners are doing a good job whilenot keeping the classroom clean themselves. This is a sign of overreliance oncleaners.Finally, equal and large numbers of our repondents answered that they felt thatspending a short amount of time during PIT (Protected Interaction Time) forcleaning up classrooms once or twice a week was the most effective way ofkeeping classrooms clean. Very few respondents felt that a competition for thebest class would be effective. Therefore, time should be spared for such cleaning. 14
  • 15. InterviewMr Sarkkunan, like most students, found the classrooms acceptable aftercleaners clean it. However, cleaners can only clean up the classroomsthoroughly about once in a week. Also, he feels that relying on cleaners tomaintain classrooms leads to a habit of laziness and reliance on others, as wellas causing the classrooms to be untidy with litter lying around on days whencleaners do not clean the classroms. The interviewee also said that the level ofcleanliness and tidyness of a classroom does indeed affect his teaching.He says that different people have different degrees of dislike towards a dirty andmessy learning environment. This compliments our survey results.On the issue of why students are not taking proper care of their classrooms, MrSarkkunan explained that many children have others to pick up their litter afterthem at home, thus making them lazy. Reliance on cleaners is also a reason forsuch laziness.When asked whether banning students from bringing food out of the canteenwould be effective in improving classroom cleanliness, Mr Sarkkunan replied thatit would only have an impact to a limited extent, and that more important factorsinclude keeping things organised under and on their desks and the teacher’stable. He also mentioned that a competition would not be effective because theenthusiastic classes would outshadow the other classes, and the other classeswould be disengaged, such that the campaign would only reach out to betterclasses, which have less of a problem in the first place. This led to us decidingnot to have a competition for the best class.Overall, Mr Sarkkunan brought out two main points. Firstly, laziness and relianceon others was a large reason why students are unwilling to keep their classesclean, and secondly, we must try to initiate in the students a habit of takingresponsibility for their classrooms. 15
  • 16. Our action week-Time for actionOur action week consists of seven disjoint days during which we got our ownclass, 2I to clean up our classroom, after which we used it as an example toextend it to 3 year 1 classes as well. However, our action plan has not yet beencarried out completely on the day of completion of this report. This is due tounforeseen obstacles that either prevented us from carrying out our action planor made carrying out our plans meaningless.The details of each day’s action plan in the original plan is as follows. Where thetasks were unable to be completed, the words in red explain why, and whereapplicable describes the actual happenings and the date on which theyhappened.Day 1- Tuesday 2/8We put up A4 leaflets to 3 classes, 1F, 1I and 1K, in order to encourage them toclean up their classrooms. This was to try to persuade them that it is important totake proper care of their classrooms. The leaflet included pictures that had beentaken of their classrooms a week before. Later on, we will return to theirclassrooms to see if there is an improvement in the upkeep of the classroom.A sample of a leaflet, in this case the leaflet given out to class 1I, as on the nextpage. 16
  • 17. Hey class of 1I,At the end of Monday your class looked like this:Not bad, of course not perfect… Please take better care of your classroom!It’s not just you. Many people use this classroom-yourself, your classmates,as well as all your teachers. Even if you don’t care, a dirty and untidyclassroom affects your other classmates, as well as your teachers. So playyour part to keep your learning environment as good as possible foreveryone. So after your last lesson, make an effort to pick up whateverlitter there is left on the floor and keep your tables tidy. It makes thecleaner’s life easier too. Don’t be messy and dirty like a stray cat… 17
  • 18. Day 2- Thursday 11/8After the last lesson, our group intended to call for the class to stay back. Wewanted to tell them the importance of cleaning up and tidying up their ownclassroom to try to keep them in class for five minutes to pick up litter and tidy uptheir tables. This will be easier in our class than in other classes because we arefamiliar with our own classmates and therefore the class would be more likely tolisten to us. However, there turned out to be a meeting for a small group ofclassmates after school. This disrupted our group’s initial plan. However, wemanaged to get the small group of students to pick up visible litter and tidy up thechairs and tables before leaving the classroom. Therefore it turned out not to bea failure although the plan had to be changed at the last minute.Because of an after-class meeting, it was not possible to ask students to pick uptheir litter. Also, the meeting meant that if we asked the students to stay back, wewould be causing a disturbance. Also, we realized that it was impractical to getthe class to stay back because some were busy, and most litter would be clearedup in a short time anyway. Therefore, we decided to only give a short speech onthe last day of the three days of asking the class to maintain the classroombefore leaving.This day’s event was pushed back to 15/8. On 15/8, we briefly, for only about fiveminutes, tried to get people to pick up litter and arrange the tables before leaving.We tried a variety of approaches. First, we tried to shout the message to theclass. Some, but not many, responded. We then tried to engage individuals bypersuading them personally. This worked to a certain extent, but reduced ourscope. Finally, we tried to lead by example and see if others would follow.However, again, only a few did, although we indeed managed to improve thestate of the classroom a fair amount with our own effort.With this result, we reflected and decided that the next time we carried out thisplan, we would write the message of picking up litter and tidying the classroomon the whiteboard during recess or lunch so that our classmates will get themessage and hopefully more will respond when we call for it.Day 3- Monday 15/8After the last lesson, we will get our own class to pick up litter and tidy up thetables after the last class ended for the day. We will attempt to educate our classabout the importance of keeping the classroom clean and tidy. The process andthe state of the classroom can be documented through photos.This had to be postponed to term 4. This is because this was pushed back toWednesday, and on Wednesday due to a surprise arrangement of lessons andprogrammes, the class was dismissed outside of the classroom. It was also notpossible to ask the class to pick up the litter before going to the lecture theatrebecause the class had to rush in order not to be late. 18
  • 19. We wanted badly to finish this plan by 26/8. However, due to reasons we do notknow, the cleaner would come into our classroom and do a brief clean-up nearthe end of the last period for the whole of the week 22/8 to 26/8. This does nothappen in other days. Therefore it did not make sense to ask the class to pick u plitter, and we only asked them to tidy their tables. Since the tables were rathertidy, we do not consider this day to be an ―action day‖ and we have to push itback to term 4.Day 4- Wednesday 17/8As with the previous day, we will hold the class back a short while after the lastclass after school. In addition, we will tell our classmates that although we willnot ask them to stay back to take care of their classroom any more, they shouldstill be responsible for their classroom. This debrief will make this day’s actionplan slightly longer than the previous session.This will also be done in term 4.Day 5- Friday 19/8After seeking permission from the form teacher of the class, we will speak to thestudents of class 1F during their Protected Interaction Time. We will use what wehave gathered from our survey and interview to find the best method to persuadestudents to take responsibility for the upkeep for their classrooms. We will remindthem that although some people do not care about a dirty and untidy classroom,there are also many who feel bad learning in a poorly maintained environment.We also told them that teachers are also affected by the level of cleanliness in aclassroom. Finally, we will tell the class that it is good to develop a habit ofresponsibility for their classroom and that they should not be lazy. We will useour class as an example of how a class can keep its classroom clean. Hopefully,our example can let the students see that they too can improve the state of theirclassrooms.On Friday, we were not given permission by our form teacher, Ms Huang Yuting,to leave the class during PIT for our task. Therefore, it had to be pushed to thefollowing Wednesday, 24/8. Yet on Wednesday, we were forced to do a currentaffairs quiz, which delayed our time such that we had only less than ten minutesto give our speech. We went to the classes we wanted to give our speech to,only to find that in both teachers, the form teacher was not inside. We thereforecould not wait for them and had no choice but to leave.We will therefore be giving our speech for 1K on Monday 29/8, as planned withtheir form teacher.Day 6- Wednesday 24/8With permission, we will also speak to the students of class 1I during theProtected Interaction Time. We will carry out the same procedure as Friday 19/8. 19
  • 20. However, we will also use our experiences from 19/8 to help us better engagethe class. Between then and 19/8, we will also continue to observe the state of1F’s classroom.The speech for 1F will be given on Wednesday 31/8.Day 7- Friday 26/8Finally, on Friday 26/8, we will persuade the last class, 1K, to take responsibilityfor the upkeep of their classroom. Our group will observe the impact of theleaflets and speeches on all 3 classes and do a final evaluation of theeffectiveness of our project. After that, we will put up a final set of leaflets in theclass to encourage them not just to take care of their classrooms on one day, buton every single day.The speech for 1I will be given in term 4. 20
  • 21. Section 5: Reflections5.1 Our Learning Journey―It has been my philosophy of life that difficulties vanish when faced boldly.‖Isaac AsimovThroughout the course of this learning journey, we were faced with manydifficulties but at the same time, we learnt many valuable lessons. Just likeAsimov, we were faced with many difficulties throughout the phase of our project.Indeed, our learning journey was not exactly smooth sailing, and we werechallenged to overcome many of the difficulties which came our way. We setmany targets for ourselves, but yet, we were not able to meet them due toseveral reasons. In our timeline, our deadlines to finish certain tasks was barelymet as we had too few meetings and all of us overestimated the time that we hadon our hands.5.2 Our ThoughtsNot everything we have done has been exactly successful, we have had manyobstacles in our way, but we never gave up, simply because we believed that wecould do it. Our initial purpose was to make a change in our school’s cleanlinessof classrooms, and even though we had to scale down our size, our group is verysure that future batches which choose to make a change in society by choosingDFC as RE would find our project useful and they can actually use this (ourreport and our research) as a foundation for their very own DFC and thus be ableto improve on the many limitations of our projects.These limitations have manifested themselves in many parts of our projects, andwe have tried our best to minimise these but however it is impossible for us tomake DFC a perfect project, because perfection simply does not exist in socialchange projects. Firstly, we have not had the privilege of a truly random sampling,and this is largely because we did not really know many people in the Year 1Batch and we reasoned that people we did not know would not want to do oursurvey simply because it was a waste of time. As such, we only distributed thesurveys to people we know who might or might not have similar viewpoints whichwould then undermine our survey results and our analysis.Secondly, it could be said that we lacked enthusiasm. Enthusiasm is an essentialpart of social change and it is because of this that we have to scale down on ourproject. Enthusiasm is often underestimated in projects, and some members didnot display this trait and because of this, we found things much harder, we foundcommunication lacking, and this was clearly a large limitation on our part, 21
  • 22. something which we caused ourselves. This then undermined many parts of ourprojects and it is only in the later part in the process of our project that we pulledourselves together and managed to finish the whole project.Thirdly, only one person was interviewed, so the perspectives that we couldobtain was limited and possibly even biased or one-sided. This was mainly dueto the fact that many teachers are busy and rejected our requests for an interview.However, this could also possibly be interpreted as the teachers becoming busieras the End-year Exams draw closer. It was also because of the lack of time wehad to search for suitable interviewees and conduct the interview as at manytimes, group members could not make it for an interview. If there was more timefor the project, two or maybe even more teachers could have been interviewed toget different perspectives from people who have taught different students.However, we have had our strengths too. One of the strengths of our project isthat the results can be applied directly to into the context of schools in Singapore.We found out the opinions of people of litter in their classrooms and primarycauses of them, and also asked respondents for improvements that could bemade. This direct question is relevant to students and schools in Singapore. Wealso found out which items people usually consumed in class, allowing the schoolto consider lee-ways to consume such food in class, or even make the rulesstricter so as to enforce discipline.Another strength in our methodology is the cross-comparison of results. Weinterviewed a teacher (Mr Sarkkunan) and compared it with the survey findings tomake sure that the results corresponded with each other. The interview was alsoused for the survey results to be more useful. The analysis which eventuallyresult was clear and simple.Certainly, just as any other social change project, we faced several challengeswhich tested our tenacity. Firstly, we lacked time, more of which would haveallowed us conduct a more comprehensive survey involving more people, whichwould have made our survey results more reliable and allowing the analysis to bemore in-depth and in so doing, allow us to derive more information on thementality and views of Year 1 Rafflesians.Secondly, the scale of our project was quite small so few classes were involved.If the scale of our project was bigger, we would have been able to see thedifference between classes and thus see how different people in differentenvironments do things (eg. cleaner classrooms having more enthusiasm incleaning up and seeing less enthusiasm in dirtier classrooms). This would havecertainly helped in many parts with our analysis for our Action Week.We have learnt many lessons in the course of this project. We were also able todiscover many part of our inner selves and our personalities through this project. 22
  • 23. We discovered that even as we ourselves are Rafflesians, we are not perfect (asmany expect us to be) and we have many flaws. One of them is that we lackenthusiasm for service learning. We were not fully committed to our project anddid not put in our full passion for it. We ended up having to scale down on ourproject, which was originally a fairly big scale.As such, our thinking has grown and has affected our perspectives. We havelearnt to be more responsible and to take charge of our own project becauseunlike in primary school, we have to become more independent and do morethings on our own. However, much as the act of social change is exciting, ourenthusiasm is hindered by the busy lifestyles which Raffles imposes on itsstudents. Thus, we find it hard to continue social change as all of us are keptextremely busy.In the future, the school could then adopt our project to make it a schoolwideactivity, so we would be able to lessen the burden of our cleaners. Our cleanersare often taken for granted and the work they do is overlooked. As Rafflesians,as Thinkers, Leaders, Pioneers, the least we could do is to start by caring forpeople around us, and this would be a good place to start. Starting from thebasics. The issues which remain is the enthusiasm of the students. However, thiscould be solved if we implement this project continually. Rafflesians would adaptand eventually get used to it, and look upon it as a weekly activity as part of theirlives in Raffles Institution. Eventually, looking at this issue from a widerperspective - one could see that if every student cultivated this habit, we couldteach the students to be responsible and take ownership for what they do. Thiswould allow the school to cut costs in hiring cleaners and direct this money toother avenues where it would be better use. Simply to say, this is killing two birdswith one stone. 23
  • 24. 6. Bibilography - InspirationsBibliographyCINCINNATI. (2011, February 15). PG.com news release. Retrieved from PG.com :http://www.pginvestor.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=104574&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1528931Magsamen, S. (2009, September 11). Oprah.com. Retrieved from Oprah.com:http://www.oprah.com/spirit/Dream-It-Believe-It-Be-It/1 24

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