Top 5 Lessons Learned - User Research in Asia
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Top 5 Lessons Learned - User Research in Asia

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My top 5 lessons learned from a year spent doing user research in Asia.

My top 5 lessons learned from a year spent doing user research in Asia.

These slides were prepared for a talk at Mozilla on May 10, 2012.

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Top 5 Lessons Learned - User Research in Asia Top 5 Lessons Learned - User Research in Asia Presentation Transcript

  • One yearThree primary countriesTop 5 Lessons Learned Delhi China Beijing Shanghai Tokyo JapanUser Research in Asia India Mumbai BangaloreMay 10, 2012 • MozillaCarissa Carter@snowflyzone
  • Hong Kong - basedChina, India, Japan - focusedTop 5 Lessons Learned Delhi China Beijing Shanghai Tokyo JapanUser Research in Asia India Mumbai BangaloreMeta more than methodCultural more than specific
  • (1) Understand the enhanced impact of recent history. Example: China
  • China Taiwan Macau Hong Kong
  • 4.9 trillion knowledge servicenominal GDP (USD) manufacturing agrarian Great leap forward Cultural Revolution 1958 1961 1966 1976 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 closed economy part planned, part open economy These factors shape the modern Chinese workforce.
  • The events we’ve experienced sculpt our lives andinform our behaviors. In China, we see one morelayer that shapes today’s knowledge workers.
  • lived abroad from China (1) Self Starter • Cultural Revolution Generation • born, raised, educated in Mainland China • very little Western exposure • immediately entrepreneurial when the economy opened up. 6 Western 5 Hybridolder younger 4 Returnee 1 2 3 Self-Starter Conformist Optimist least common MNC management gap lived only in China Age + time spent abroad = 6 archetypes of worker
  • lived abroad from China (2) Conformist • Cultural Revolution and Transition Generations • lived only in Mainland China • accept Communism • accept information provided to them by 6 the Chinese government Western 5 Hybridolder younger 4 Returnee 1 2 3 Self-Starter Conformist Optimist least common MNC management gap lived only in China Age + time spent abroad = 6 archetypes of worker
  • lived abroad from China (3) Optimist • Opportunity Generation • born, raised, educated in Mainland China • possible Western exposure via employment (themselves or a friend) at a MNC 6 • life in China is great Western 5 Hybridolder younger 4 Returnee 1 2 3 Self-Starter Conformist Optimist least common MNC management gap lived only in China Age + time spent abroad = 6 archetypes of worker
  • lived abroad from China (4) Returnee • Transition Generation • born and raised in Mainland China, educated overseas • now live in China • many advantages for these sea turtles 6 Western 5 Hybridolder younger 4 Returnee 1 2 3 Self-Starter Conformist Optimist least common MNC management gap lived only in China Age + time spent abroad = 6 archetypes of worker
  • lived abroad from China (5) Hybrid • individuals of Chinese descent • born, raised, educated in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, Singapore, Malaysia • now live in China • East-West understanding 6 • highly sought-after by MNCs Western 5 Hybridolder younger 4 Returnee 1 2 3 Self-Starter Conformist Optimist least common MNC management gap lived only in China Age + time spent abroad = 6 archetypes of worker
  • lived abroad from China (6) Western • born, raised, educated in a Western country • live permanently in China • often sent by MNCs 6 Western 5 Hybridolder younger 4 Returnee 1 2 3 Self-Starter Conformist Optimist least common MNC management gap lived only in China Age + time spent abroad = 6 archetypes of worker
  • lived economy opens 40 birth rate (per thousand) abroad Western 30 20 Hybrid 1958 1961 1966 1976 Great leap Cultural Revolution 10 Returnee forward birth year 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 age 51-66 today age 34-51 today age 25-34 today age 16-25 today Degree to which the present Survivor Cultural Revolution Transition Opportunity China Generations knowledge work- Generation Generation Generation Generation force has lived abroad or stayedin Mainland China Baby Boomer Self Starter Gen X Conformist Gen Y (Millenial) Optimist Western Generations lived in mainland China Knowledge worker archetypes in more detail.
  • recap(1) Understand the enhanced impact of recent history. What events have shaped your target users? How does this affect their behavior or attitudes as related to your product?
  • (2) Find the momentum of the population. Example: India
  • ChinaPakistan New Delhi Nepal Bhutan India Calcutta Bangladesh Myanmar Mumbai Hyderabad Bangalore Chennai Sri Lanka
  • 70+ 50-69 ! Under 20 Under 3535-49 20-34 1.2 billion people. 800 million under 35. World’s largest youth population.
  • Signs of success: motorbike, car, home.
  • “One hundred and fifty years ofMongol rule, and 200 years ofBritish rule? We were deprivedfor a long time. We were readyfor 1991.”Entrepreneurial drive: laying pipes to bring water.
  • recap(2) Find the momentum of the population. Where does the energy of your users come from? How will you tap into it? What role do religion, politics, or other factors play?
  • (3) Tap into self-perceptions. Example: Japan
  • Russia Sapporo Sendai March 11, 2011 earthquake epicenter S. Korea Tokyo Kyoto Hiroshima Yokohama Osaka FukuokaChina Japan Taiwan
  • Western conception Eastern conception of Self of Self “To thine own self be true” “Where self is, truth is not. -Shakespeare Where truth is, self is not.” -Buddha • analytic • holistic • ego-focused emphasis on stability • balance focused • need resolution of contradiction • embrace contradiction • individualist • collectivist and interdependent • cultural mandate to define unique • dialectical society means attributes and express and affirm acknowledgement of transience themStart with opposites but be aware of blurring lines.
  • In their own eyes: quick to act China China is more indecisive than SingaporeJapan is less aggressive than Singapore loud quiet is quieter than India India Japan contemplative Understand self-stated relationships to neighbors.
  • hierarchical flat collectivist individualist worker bees free thinkers older means wiser ability trumps experience what others think is most important what I feel is most important personal collaborative fixed free address closed open walls benching furniture as commodity furniture helps performance uniform seating ergonomic seating heavy paper use mostly digital documents technology standards employee selected equipment energy from the code energy from the crowd passive world participant active world contributor set work hours work time flexible long commute OK need a clear path home meeting-heavy casual collaborationCreate and use spectrums to visualize trends.
  • recap(3) Tap into self-perceptions. How does the culture you are working with view itself with respect to its neighbors? The world? How might these perceptions affect your product?
  • (4) Use images as language. Everywhere.
  • Use images to probe for aspiration and description.
  • recap(4) Use images as language. With a language and cultural barrier, how might you use images to understand the high-level needs of your users?
  • (5) Know what you’re up against and leverage it. Example: China
  • Change in China is top down vs. bottom up.
  • recap(5) Know what you’re up against and leverage it. What barriers stand in the way of people adopting your product or experience? How can you use this constraint to your advantage?
  • Top 5 Lessons LearnedUser Research in Asia(1) Understand the enhanced impact of recent history.(2) Find the momentum of the population.(3) Tap into self-perceptions.(4) Use images as language.(5) Know what you’re up against and leverage it.
  • thank you.questions?carissa.carter@gmail.com @snowflyzone snowflyzone.com paralleldesignlabs.com screemagazine.com about.me/carissacarter