ORGAN DONATION  Shannon L. Novitski
ThesisI chose to do organ donation because it literally savespeoples lives, it can change a persons life, and it iscontrov...
Personal RelevanceWhy is this topic personal to you?
The Basics                         What is an organ?                         What is an organ transplant?Center for Bioeth...
History of Organ Donation                         Organ donation has been going on for over fifty years                    ...
Process of Organ Donation                        Eligibility for organ donation                        Sources for donor o...
Cadaveric Organs                         How to become an organ donor                         United Network for Organ Sha...
After Math of Organ                                                     Donation                           Recovery       ...
Equal Opportunity                      Shortage of available organs                      Distributive justice             ...
Alternative Organs                        Animal organs                        Artificial organs                        Ste...
Animal Organs                       Xenotransplantation                       Transgenic animalsWinters, Adam. Organ Trans...
Artificial Organs                       What is an artificial organ?                        Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal...
Stem Cells                          What are stem cells?                          Hope from stem cells                    ...
Aborted Fetuses                       Don’t worry it’s only a suggestion!                       The use for aborted fetuse...
Black Market Organ                                                                           Donation                     ...
Transplant Tourism
Organ Donation via the      Internet
Legal and Social Issues                           Purpose of organ donation laws                           National Organ ...
Application Componentdescribe in detail you application componentmultiple slidesuses pictures, videos, etc.approximately 8...
Class ActivityName that organMyth or fact?Place the organ in the designated area
Works Citedcitations
Conclusionwhat did you learn?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Organ Donation

734 views

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
734
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • An organ is a mass of cells and tissues that work together to perform a specialized function in the body.\n\nAn organ transplant is a surgical operation that removes a failing organ and is then replaced with a new one. \n
  • In 1954 the first successful kidney transplant happened \n\nIn 1962 the first successful cadaveric transplant \n\nIn 1982 was the first artificial transplant \n\n
  • When a person’s organ is failing a doctor will assess the person’s eligibility for a transplant. Then the person is referred to a transplant center where their mental and physical health is evaluated.\n\nThere are two different types of organ sources cadaveric and living organs. Cadaveric organs are organs taken from recently deceased people. Living organ donors are usually relatives, spouses, and close friends. \n
  • At the age of sixteen we are all able to become an organ donor by indicating it on our driver’s license. \n\nIn some states if a person has not indicated whether they are an organ donor hospitals will require family consent before removing their organs. \n\nThe United Network for Organ Sharing provides the list for the national waiting pool. The national waiting pool is for people who are waiting for an organ from a cadaver. \n\nWhen the organ becomes available it is taken to the Organ Procurement Organization. From there the OPO matches the donor organ its recipient. Many factors such as organ type, blood type, organ size, etc. go into matching a donor organ to a patient.\n\n
  • Rejection is when the fights off the new organ because it thinks of it as a foreign invader such as a virus or bacteria. The body produces antibodies that attack the organ. Doctors will give the patients immunosuppressant drugs to lower the level of antibodies that way the new organ can adapt to the body. \n
  • One of the main issues when it comes to organ transplants is that there are a shortage of available organs. As of March 1, 2011 the waiting list is over 110,000. \nThe United Network for Organ Sharing holds the waiting list and here are some of their statistics.\n-On average 17 patients will die waiting for an organ\n-Everyday 106 people are added to the list\n-68 patients receive an organ everyday\n\n\nDistributive justice is a way to fairly divide resources. When it comes to organs the theory says that there is no “right,” way to distribute organs. There are many ways to reasons to choose who to give an organ to such as: a person’s needs, effort, contribution, and merit. \n\nEqual access is a form of distributive justice. Equal access is based on objective factors such as length of time waiting (first come, first served) and age (youngest to oldest). This method is free of race, gender, and income level biases. \n\nMaximum benefit is another form of distributive justice where the goal is to maximize the number of successful transplants such as medical need (giving the sickest people the first opportunity) and the probable success of a transplant (giving the organs who will most likely live the longest).\n
  • \n
  • Xenotransplantation is when animal organs are transplanted into human beings\n\nTransgenic animals are animals that have human genes injected into them. Scientists do this because the human body attacks and kills the foreign cells\n\nPigs are biologically similar to humans. In 1997 Robert Pennington received a pig liver. The liver was placed next to Robert’s bed and tubes from the liver to Robert. The tubes pumped the poisoned blood out and clean blood back in. The pig liver was used for six and a half hours until a human liver available. \n
  • An artificial organ is a man-made device that functions as an organ. Some were used permanently, but most were used temporarily until a live organ became available.\n\nCAPD is a is machine that pumps blood through an artificial kidney (dialysis). The patient is hooked up to tubes several times a day to filter waste. \n\nThe iron lung was invented by Philip Drinker and Louis Shaw in 1928. It was a large metal tank pumped air forcing your chest to rise and fall so you could breathe. \n\nThe heart-lung machine was invented by Dr. John Gibbon in 1953. When your heart and lungs stop working this machine temporarily take over. This was a big breakthrough becuawe it allowed surgeons to have more time to operate in open-heart surgery. \n\n\n
  • Stem cells are cell that can specialize into many different cells in the human body\n\nScientists hope to be able to grow stem cells into entire organs or groups of specialized cells\n\nStem cells are most dominant in the human embryo. The problem with the cells being in the embryo is when the cells are removed the embryo is destroyed.\n\nStem cells are a major controversy because removing them kills a potential life\n
  • Aborted fetuses is only a suggested form of organs\n\nTheir organs would be used for infants\n\nThis form of transplanted organs is very controversial for many reasons. One of them being that people say it would condone late-term abortions. \n
  • Transplant tourism is when people travel to other countries in order to obtain an organ transplant\n\nInstead of \n\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Laws: The laws exist to ensure safe and fair collection and distribution of organs. They also have been imposed to increase the number of available organs for donations. \n\nNOTA: was established to improve the collection and distribution of organs. It enforces UNOS keep a nationwide computer registry of all patients in need of organs. It established the OPTN and the Task Force on Organ Transplantation. It also bans the purchase or sale of organs or tissues. \n\nCOBRA: requires hospitals and Organ Procurement Organizations to work with each other. \n\nFirst Person: this law requires hospitals and organ procurement organizations to follow a patients organ donation wishes as indicated on their driver’s license or in a health care directive. This means that it does not require hospitals or OPOs to ask the person’s family for consent to remove their organs. \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Organ Donation

    1. 1. ORGAN DONATION Shannon L. Novitski
    2. 2. ThesisI chose to do organ donation because it literally savespeoples lives, it can change a persons life, and it iscontroversial.Through my application component I was able to seewhat it was like for transplant patient and how it hasaffected their life.
    3. 3. Personal RelevanceWhy is this topic personal to you?
    4. 4. The Basics What is an organ? What is an organ transplant?Center for Bioethics. "Alternative Organ Sources." Organ Transplantation. Minnesota: The Starr Foundation, 2003. 28-29. www.bioethics.umn.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/ Organ_Transplantation.pdf>
    5. 5. History of Organ Donation Organ donation has been going on for over fifty years 1954 1962 1982Center for Bioethics. "Alternative Organ Sources." Organ Transplantation. Minnesota: The Starr Foundation, 2003. 28-29. www.bioethics.umn.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/ Organ_Transplantation.pdf>
    6. 6. Process of Organ Donation Eligibility for organ donation Sources for donor organsCenter for Bioethics. "Alternative Organ Sources." Organ Transplantation. Minnesota: The Starr Foundation, 2003. 28-29. www.bioethics.umn.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/ Organ_Transplantation.pdf>
    7. 7. Cadaveric Organs How to become an organ donor United Network for Organ Sharing Organ Procurement OrganizationCenter for Bioethics. "Alternative Organ Sources." Organ Transplantation. Minnesota: The Starr Foundation, 2003. 28-29. www.bioethics.umn.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/ Organ_Transplantation.pdf>
    8. 8. After Math of Organ Donation Recovery RejectionCenter for Bioethics. "Alternative Organ Sources." Organ Transplantation. Minnesota: The Starr Foundation, 2003. 28-29. www.bioethics.umn.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/ Organ_Transplantation.pdf>
    9. 9. Equal Opportunity Shortage of available organs Distributive justice Equal access Maximum benefitCenter for Bioethics. "Alternative Organ Sources." Organ Transplantation. Minnesota: The Starr Foundation, 2003. 28-29. www.bioethics.umn.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/ Organ_Transplantation.pdf>
    10. 10. Alternative Organs Animal organs Artificial organs Stem cells Aborted fetusesCenter for Bioethics. "Alternative Organ Sources." Organ Transplantation. Minnesota: The Starr Foundation, 2003. 28-29. www.bioethics.umn.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/ Organ_Transplantation.pdf>
    11. 11. Animal Organs Xenotransplantation Transgenic animalsWinters, Adam. Organ Transplant: The Debate Over Who, How, and Why. New Yorkhttp://www.google.com/images?hl=en&source=imghp&biw=1140&bih=615&q=pigs&gbv=2&aq=f&aqi=g9g-s1&aql=&oq=
    12. 12. Artificial Organs What is an artificial organ? Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Iron lung Heart-lung machineWinters, Adam. Organ Transplant: The Debate Over Who, How, and Why. New York
    13. 13. Stem Cells What are stem cells? Hope from stem cells Where stem cells are located Why stem cell research is so controversialCenter for Bioethics. "Alternative Organ Sources." Organ Transplantation. Minnesota: The Starr Foundation, 2003. 28-29. www.bioethics.umn.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/ Organ_Transplantation.pdf>http://hummersandcigarettes.blogspot.com/2010/10/stem-cell-research-new-breakthroughs.html
    14. 14. Aborted Fetuses Don’t worry it’s only a suggestion! The use for aborted fetusesCenter for Bioethics. "Alternative Organ Sources." Organ Transplantation. Minnesota: The Starr Foundation, 2003. 28-29. www.bioethics.umn.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/ Organ_Transplantation.pdf>
    15. 15. Black Market Organ Donation Transplant tourism The internetKalogjera, Liliana M. "New Means of Increasing the Transplant Organ Supply." Journal of the Section of Individual Rights and Responsibilities 34.4 (2007): n. pag. MasterFILE Premier. Web. 4 Nov. 2010. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/
    16. 16. Transplant Tourism
    17. 17. Organ Donation via the Internet
    18. 18. Legal and Social Issues Purpose of organ donation laws National Organ Transplant Act of 1984 Consolidated Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1986 First Person Consent LawsCenter for Bioethics. "Alternative Organ Sources." Organ Transplantation. Minnesota: The Starr Foundation, 2003. 28-29. www.bioethics.umn.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/ Organ_Transplantation.pdf>
    19. 19. Application Componentdescribe in detail you application componentmultiple slidesuses pictures, videos, etc.approximately 8-15 minutes
    20. 20. Class ActivityName that organMyth or fact?Place the organ in the designated area
    21. 21. Works Citedcitations
    22. 22. Conclusionwhat did you learn?

    ×