Property Security, Emergency Response, and Fire Protection Systems Chapter 13
Learning Objectives <ul><li>Identify and describe the three components to the means of egress </li></ul><ul><li>List and d...
Learning Objectives (continued) <ul><li>Describe the purpose of an emergency building entrance system </li></ul><ul><li>De...
Introduction <ul><li>Building security systems can inhibit the ability of people to exit the building during an emergency ...
Means of Egress <ul><li>Means of egress: continuous and unobstructed path of travel used by building occupants </li></ul><...
Figure 13-1 The three parts of the means of egress
Exit Access <ul><li>Exit access: portion of the means of egress that leads to the exit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Any useable s...
Exit <ul><li>Exit : portion of the means of egress separated from the other parts of the building </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fi...
Exit Discharge <ul><li>Exit discharge: portion of the means of egress between the exit and the public way </li></ul><ul><l...
Maintaining the Means of Egress <ul><li>Some occupancies offer greater exiting challenges than others </li></ul><ul><li>Ov...
Exit Stairway Doors <ul><li>Interior exit stairways doors required to be openable from both sides </li></ul><ul><li>Under ...
Stairway Doors in High-Rise Buildings <ul><li>High-rise buildings require additional fire protection due to selective evac...
Delayed Egress Locks <ul><li>Latching device holds secure until person applies force for one second </li></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Delayed Egress Locks (continued) <ul><li>Requirements to follow to comply with the model codes: (continued) </li></ul><ul>...
Figure 13-4 Door equipped with delayed egress hardware
Access-Controlled Egress Doors <ul><li>Use and occupancy determines whether this type of security hardware is permissible ...
Fire Department Access Systems <ul><li>Forcible entry used by first responders when ready access not available </li></ul><...
Security Gates <ul><li>Emergency responders must be able to enter property with little or no delay </li></ul><ul><li>When ...
Siren Sensors <ul><li>Most commonly used detection and access system </li></ul><ul><li>As fire department vehicle approach...
Figure 13-15 Siren Sensor
Proprietary Fire Department Access Key <ul><li>Some security gates require a key to operate </li></ul><ul><li>Fire departm...
Access Cards and Access Codes <ul><li>Least desirable access method  </li></ul><ul><li>Requires responders to leave the ve...
Radio Frequency Sensor <ul><li>Similar to siren system, but uses the fire department radio </li></ul><ul><li>Fire departme...
Fire Protection System Interface <ul><li>Security gate control mechanisms connect to the fire alarm system </li></ul><ul><...
Summary <ul><li>Building and occupant security a priority for some organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Security devices may hi...
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Chapter 13

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Chapter 13

  1. 1. Property Security, Emergency Response, and Fire Protection Systems Chapter 13
  2. 2. Learning Objectives <ul><li>Identify and describe the three components to the means of egress </li></ul><ul><li>List and describe the override requirements for exit stairway doors in high-rise buildings </li></ul><ul><li>List and describe the requirements for delayed egress locks </li></ul><ul><li>List and describe the requirements for access controlled egress doors </li></ul>
  3. 3. Learning Objectives (continued) <ul><li>Describe the purpose of an emergency building entrance system </li></ul><ul><li>Describe what is typically inside an emergency building entrance system </li></ul><ul><li>List and describe the different methods of property access through security gates and vehicle barriers </li></ul>
  4. 4. Introduction <ul><li>Building security systems can inhibit the ability of people to exit the building during an emergency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Emergency responders must be able to access a facility at any time to investigate emergency calls </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Model codes outline methods for ingress and egress </li></ul><ul><li>Security systems must be tied to fire protection systems to allow free egress </li></ul>
  5. 5. Means of Egress <ul><li>Means of egress: continuous and unobstructed path of travel used by building occupants </li></ul><ul><li>Three parts to the means of egress: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Exit access </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exit discharge </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Figure 13-1 The three parts of the means of egress
  7. 7. Exit Access <ul><li>Exit access: portion of the means of egress that leads to the exit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Any useable space on any floor </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Travel distance : maximum allowable distance a person must move within the exit access </li></ul><ul><li>Limiting travel distance minimizes a person’s exposure to a fire condition </li></ul><ul><li>Travel distance determined by occupancy condition and presence of sprinkler system </li></ul>
  8. 8. Exit <ul><li>Exit : portion of the means of egress separated from the other parts of the building </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fire-resistant or fire-rated construction provides a protected path to the exit discharge </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Exit stairways or horizontal exits built to protect people from fire </li></ul><ul><li>No requirement for fire-rated construction in one-level, standalone buildings </li></ul>
  9. 9. Exit Discharge <ul><li>Exit discharge: portion of the means of egress between the exit and the public way </li></ul><ul><li>Once a person leaves an exit, the outside area from the exit door leads away from the building </li></ul>
  10. 10. Maintaining the Means of Egress <ul><li>Some occupancies offer greater exiting challenges than others </li></ul><ul><li>Over the past 100 years, many injuries and deaths have been exit-related </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Even with advancements, egress is a challenge </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adding ingress and egress control devices further complicates the exiting process </li></ul><ul><li>Inspectors periodically mistake locked exit doors as building or fire code violations </li></ul>
  11. 11. Exit Stairway Doors <ul><li>Interior exit stairways doors required to be openable from both sides </li></ul><ul><li>Under certain conditions, doors may be locked </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: stairway discharge door must be openable from the egress side </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Locking from the ingress side permissible </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Stairway doors must remained latched so they do not blow open to allow smoke to enter </li></ul>
  12. 12. Stairway Doors in High-Rise Buildings <ul><li>High-rise buildings require additional fire protection due to selective evacuation </li></ul><ul><li>Emergency responders must be able to unlock all stairway doors from fire command </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Turn a key or flip a switch from the fire alarm panel </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Doors must remain latched to operate as fire doors </li></ul><ul><li>Telephones or two-way communication systems must be installed in the stairways </li></ul>
  13. 13. Delayed Egress Locks <ul><li>Latching device holds secure until person applies force for one second </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: psychiatric care facilities that need to prevent patients from walking out unnoticed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Requirements to follow to comply with the model codes: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Controlled doors must unlock on sprinkler/fire detection system activation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Controlled doors must unlock on loss of power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Controlled doors must unlock by signal from fire command center </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Delayed Egress Locks (continued) <ul><li>Requirements to follow to comply with the model codes: (continued) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Applying 15 pounds of force for one second starts a process that releases the door in 15 seconds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Alarm sounds near the door </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relocking the door is only by manual means </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sign posted above and within twelve inches of the release device gives operation instructions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There must be emergency lights at the door so the sign can be read </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Figure 13-4 Door equipped with delayed egress hardware
  16. 16. Access-Controlled Egress Doors <ul><li>Use and occupancy determines whether this type of security hardware is permissible </li></ul><ul><li>Requirements for access-controlled egress doors similar to delayed egress </li></ul><ul><li>Certain occupancies may be required to leave main entrance doors unlocked </li></ul><ul><li>Consult local building and fire officials to determine system requirements </li></ul>
  17. 17. Fire Department Access Systems <ul><li>Forcible entry used by first responders when ready access not available </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Necessary to reduce operational delays </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Emergency building entrance systems provide method of entry that is non-destructive </li></ul><ul><li>Safe-like security box anchored to the wall at building entrance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Holds rapid entry keys, important documents </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use a proprietary key specific to a jurisdiction </li></ul>
  18. 18. Security Gates <ul><li>Emergency responders must be able to enter property with little or no delay </li></ul><ul><li>When no security guards, gate and barrier operation is by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Siren-sensing device </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Proprietary fire department access key </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Access code or card </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Radio signal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interface with the fire protection system </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Siren Sensors <ul><li>Most commonly used detection and access system </li></ul><ul><li>As fire department vehicle approaches the gate, sounds a siren tone for a few seconds </li></ul><ul><li>Sensor mounted near the gate detects and operates the gate mechanism </li></ul><ul><li>Major benefit is that it allows personnel to stay in their vehicle </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduces response time and increases safety </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Figure 13-15 Siren Sensor
  21. 21. Proprietary Fire Department Access Key <ul><li>Some security gates require a key to operate </li></ul><ul><li>Fire departments require the key to be the same as the one used for building access system </li></ul><ul><li>Control system fitted with a lock core switch </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Matches the fire department’s emergency access key pattern </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Not as efficient as the siren sensor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Operates as a backup to the siren sensor </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Access Cards and Access Codes <ul><li>Least desirable access method </li></ul><ul><li>Requires responders to leave the vehicle, open the security box, and locate a card or a code </li></ul><ul><li>Access codes and cards may no longer be valid </li></ul><ul><li>Fire personnel lose valuable time, placing life and property in greater danger </li></ul>
  23. 23. Radio Frequency Sensor <ul><li>Similar to siren system, but uses the fire department radio </li></ul><ul><li>Fire department radio keys a predetermined channel for a few seconds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sensor mounted near the gate detects the frequency and operates the gate mechanism </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Allows fire personnel to stay in the vehicle </li></ul><ul><li>Important to periodically inspect </li></ul>
  24. 24. Fire Protection System Interface <ul><li>Security gate control mechanisms connect to the fire alarm system </li></ul><ul><li>Simple process requires an alarm initiation device to activate </li></ul><ul><li>Device is a detector or water flow switch </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rarely a manual pull station </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Once signaled, the gate opens before the fire department arrives </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces security </li></ul>
  25. 25. Summary <ul><li>Building and occupant security a priority for some organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Security devices may hinder emergency response </li></ul><ul><li>Model codes publish installation packages that require system overrides </li></ul><ul><li>Emergency building entrance systems provide necessary keys, codes, or tools to enter </li></ul><ul><li>Critical factor that could be life or death: time! </li></ul>

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