Fire Prevention Through Public Education, Awareness, and the Public Forum   Chapter 10
Objectives <ul><li>Upon completion of this chapter, you will be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss and contrast the use of...
Objectives (cont’d.) <ul><li>Describe the five-step process for public fire safety education planning and discuss the impo...
Public Fire Safety Education— Selling Fire Safety <ul><li>To reduce the incidence of hostile fire </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pu...
Education, The Second “E” <ul><li>“ Engineering, education, and enforcement” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Slogan still used aroun...
FIGURE 10-2 Education is the second of the Three E’s. ( Courtesy of New York University )
National Fire Prevention Programs <ul><li>Fire Prevention Day first observed: 1911 </li></ul><ul><li>President Harding pro...
Planning Fire Safety Education Programs <ul><li>Must target audiences that can have an impact on the jurisdiction’s fire p...
The Five-Step Program <ul><li>Developed/released by the U.S. Fire Administration in 1979 </li></ul><ul><li>Step-by-step pr...
FIGURE 10-6 The Five-Step Process for Public Fire Education was developed by the U.S. Fire Administration in 1979
Identification <ul><li>U se fire records/statistics to detect most serious fire problems in the community </li></ul><ul><u...
Selection <ul><li>Target audiences must be selected </li></ul><ul><li>High-risk persons may not necessarily be the target ...
Design <ul><li>Actual program developed for presentation to target audience. </li></ul><ul><li>The message is packaged int...
Implementation <ul><li>Program may have to be adjusted or tweaked </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback may reveal opportunities not ...
Evaluation <ul><li>Not final step </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The process is a loop or a cycle </li></ul></ul><ul><li>View of ho...
Fire Safety Education in the Schools <ul><li>Long recognized as effective method of instilling fire-safe behaviors/attitud...
Commercial Fire Safety Programs <ul><li>In most cases, the most effective method of providing complex programs </li></ul><...
Fire Safety Education for Adults <ul><li>Accomplished through the media </li></ul><ul><li>“ Change your clock, change your...
Fire Safety Education for Businesses <ul><li>For some businesses, fire codes mandate: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Employee and o...
Motivating Adults <ul><li>Effective methods: planning, training, drills </li></ul><ul><li>Building occupants evacuated muc...
Effective Use of the Media <ul><li>News reporting/information dissemination </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Potential for reaching t...
Public Hearings <ul><li>Fact of life for public officials </li></ul><ul><li>Fire chiefs must justify their budgets in publ...
Hearing Preparation <ul><li>The more time spent in preparation for public hearings, the less that can go wrong </li></ul><...
Summary <ul><li>Fire safety education more about sales than education </li></ul><ul><li>Public fire safety education not a...
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Chapter 10

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Chapter 10

  1. 1. Fire Prevention Through Public Education, Awareness, and the Public Forum Chapter 10
  2. 2. Objectives <ul><li>Upon completion of this chapter, you will be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss and contrast the use of local and national fire statistics in developing fire safety education programs </li></ul><ul><li>Describe the impact of America Burning on the role of fire departments in public fire safety education </li></ul>
  3. 3. Objectives (cont’d.) <ul><li>Describe the five-step process for public fire safety education planning and discuss the importance of planning in the development of fire safety education programs </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss the role of the media in public fire safety education </li></ul>
  4. 4. Public Fire Safety Education— Selling Fire Safety <ul><li>To reduce the incidence of hostile fire </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public support/cooperation are necessary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>After only a few calls to the principal from angry parents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fire safety education is no longer a welcome topic </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>At 85, odds of dying by fire will be nearly five fold over that of a 20-year-old person </li></ul>
  5. 5. Education, The Second “E” <ul><li>“ Engineering, education, and enforcement” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Slogan still used around the fire service </li></ul></ul><ul><li>For a fire safety message to be effective </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public must personally identify with it </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Translating the abstract into concrete </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Involves putting faces on the victims </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. FIGURE 10-2 Education is the second of the Three E’s. ( Courtesy of New York University )
  7. 7. National Fire Prevention Programs <ul><li>Fire Prevention Day first observed: 1911 </li></ul><ul><li>President Harding proclaimed the first Fire Prevention Week: 1922 </li></ul><ul><li>Over two million copies of Safeguarding the Home Against Fire distributed to schools: 1918 </li></ul><ul><li>Over two million copies of Safeguarding the Nation Against Fire distributed: 1930 </li></ul>
  8. 8. Planning Fire Safety Education Programs <ul><li>Must target audiences that can have an impact on the jurisdiction’s fire problem </li></ul><ul><li>Local statistics should be carefully reviewed </li></ul><ul><li>Planning: crucial to program success </li></ul><ul><li>People: backbone of the program </li></ul>
  9. 9. The Five-Step Program <ul><li>Developed/released by the U.S. Fire Administration in 1979 </li></ul><ul><li>Step-by-step process to walk planners through each phase </li></ul><ul><li>Available free of charge from the USFA’s Publications Center </li></ul><ul><li>Steps: identification, selection, design, implementation, and evaluation </li></ul>
  10. 10. FIGURE 10-6 The Five-Step Process for Public Fire Education was developed by the U.S. Fire Administration in 1979
  11. 11. Identification <ul><li>U se fire records/statistics to detect most serious fire problems in the community </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High-risk groups have not necessarily have suffered losses in recent past </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Undertake thorough review of local, regional, and national statistics </li></ul><ul><li>Good cooperation among department and state agencies beneficial </li></ul>
  12. 12. Selection <ul><li>Target audiences must be selected </li></ul><ul><li>High-risk persons may not necessarily be the target audience </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Programs target children/seniors caregivers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Key element: identification of available material and human resources </li></ul>
  13. 13. Design <ul><li>Actual program developed for presentation to target audience. </li></ul><ul><li>The message is packaged into the delivery system for the target audience in step 2 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Commercials played by radio stations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Presentation to live audience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Program designed to be handed off and presented by another group or groups </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Implementation <ul><li>Program may have to be adjusted or tweaked </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback may reveal opportunities not anticipated </li></ul><ul><li>Fire safety educators must be able to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Think on their feet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make adjustments to ensure the message is delivered, received, and accepted </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Evaluation <ul><li>Not final step </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The process is a loop or a cycle </li></ul></ul><ul><li>View of how the program affected changes in awareness, knowledge, or behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Mechanism to make changes to increase effectiveness of the program </li></ul><ul><li>Use of tests or surveys before and after the program </li></ul>
  16. 16. Fire Safety Education in the Schools <ul><li>Long recognized as effective method of instilling fire-safe behaviors/attitudes in children </li></ul><ul><li>America Burning (1973) recommendations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accreditation standards for fire safety education in schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fire safety education for teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge of fire safety prerequisite for teaching certification </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Commercial Fire Safety Programs <ul><li>In most cases, the most effective method of providing complex programs </li></ul><ul><li>NFPA’s Learn Not to Burn ® and Risk Watch ®: fire/injury prevention for children </li></ul><ul><li>Remembering When: A Fire and Full Prevention Program for Older Adults ™ </li></ul><ul><li>Not cheap </li></ul><ul><li>Play Safe! Be Safe! for children ages 3-5 </li></ul>
  18. 18. Fire Safety Education for Adults <ul><li>Accomplished through the media </li></ul><ul><li>“ Change your clock, change your smoke detector battery” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The message does produce results </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhanced by children asking about smoke alarms </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fire Prevention Week messages and press releases by NFPA/USFA </li></ul>
  19. 19. Fire Safety Education for Businesses <ul><li>For some businesses, fire codes mandate: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Employee and occupant training </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development of emergency plans </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fire prevention bureaus should develop boilerplate plans to be filled in by business owners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Take the guesswork out of preparation </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Motivating Adults <ul><li>Effective methods: planning, training, drills </li></ul><ul><li>Building occupants evacuated much more quickly on 9/11 than during 1993 bombing </li></ul><ul><li>Bombing made occupants to take the WTC fire safety plan/drills more seriously </li></ul><ul><li>Fire safety education after fatal incidents </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One of the few ways to bring good out of bad </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Should be considered a tribute to the victims </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Effective Use of the Media <ul><li>News reporting/information dissemination </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Potential for reaching the largest audience </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If accurate information not available </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Media resorts to less-than-accurate information from unofficial sources </li></ul></ul><ul><li>No better platform than the fire scene to deliver message of fire safety </li></ul>
  22. 22. Public Hearings <ul><li>Fact of life for public officials </li></ul><ul><li>Fire chiefs must justify their budgets in public hearings before elected officials </li></ul><ul><li>Fire prevention bureaus become involved: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>During hearings on code adoptions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>At hearings before appeals boards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hearings often televised </li></ul>
  23. 23. Hearing Preparation <ul><li>The more time spent in preparation for public hearings, the less that can go wrong </li></ul><ul><li>State and federal Freedom of Information and Sunshine laws </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prohibit deliberation of elected officials except in duly advertised public hearings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fire department managers should have a good working knowledge of the regulations </li></ul>
  24. 24. Summary <ul><li>Fire safety education more about sales than education </li></ul><ul><li>Public fire safety education not a modern phenomenon </li></ul><ul><li>1973 America Burning report recognized as a watershed for fire safety education </li></ul><ul><li>Media a critical element in delivery of effective fire safety education programs </li></ul>

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