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Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
Chapter 02
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Chapter 02

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Transcript

  • 1. Chapter 2 Safety Concepts
  • 2. Objectives
    • List the three elements that affect safety in the work environment
    • Discuss the differences between formal and informal processes
    • List the qualities of a well-written procedure or guideline
  • 3. Objectives (con’t.)
    • Discuss the external influences that influence safety equipment design and purchase
    • List and discuss the three factors that contribute to a person’s ability to act safely
    • Define risk management
    • Identify and explain the five parts of classic risk management
  • 4. Theory Versus Reality: An Introduction to Safety Concepts
    • ISOs need both theory and reality
      • Theory: uncommon sense
        • Recognized safety concepts
      • Reality: common sense
    • ISOs look at components of operational environment
      • Procedures, equipment, and personnel
  • 5. Figure 2-1 Personnel, equipment, and procedures all play a role in defining safety in operations.
  • 6. Safety in the Operational Environment
    • Procedures
      • Strict processes with little or no flexibility
      • Formal (written) or informal (routine practices)
      • SOPs: standard operating procedures
    • Guidelines
      • Adaptable templates that give widespread application flexibility
      • SOGs: standard operating guidelines
  • 7. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Sample standard operating procedure (SOP) topics:
      • Use of PPE and SCBA
      • Equipment maintenance
      • Risk/benefit principles
      • Highway and traffic safety at incidents
      • Accident/injury procedures and reporting
      • Incident scene accountability
  • 8. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Qualities of a good SOP
      • Clear outline
      • Simple language
      • Clear direction
      • Tested technique
      • Easy interpretation
      • Applicability to many scenarios
      • Specific only on critical/life-endangering points
  • 9. Figure 2-2 A sample SOP index.
  • 10. Figure 2-3 A sample SOP format.
  • 11. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Equipment
      • Least important factor in operational triad of procedure, equipment, and personnel
      • Selection and use factors:
        • Department mission
        • External influences
        • Maintenance
        • The right equipment
  • 12. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Equipment (con’t.)
      • Department mission
        • List types of incidents handled in jurisdiction
        • List equipment necessary to safely handle incidents
        • Check items that are essential
        • Note items that are nice to have
  • 13. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Equipment (con’t.)
      • External influences: focus on required equipment
        • OSHA regulations
        • NFPA standards
        • NIOSH, ANSI, and UL
  • 14. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Equipment (con’t.)
      • Equipment maintenance
        • Keep complete documentation of repairs and maintenance
        • Maintain complete set of equipment guidelines regarding selection, use, cleaning and decontamination, storage, inspection, repairs, and criteria for retirement
  • 15. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Equipment (con’t.)
      • The right equipment
        • Personal protective equipment: be aware of the thermal protective performance (TPP) rating
        • Apparatus
        • Tools
        • Station equipment
  • 16. Figure 2-6 High-tech tools allow firefighters to work more safely and monitor their health.
  • 17. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Personnel
      • Three factors contribute to a person’s ability to act safely
        • Training
        • Health
        • Attitude
  • 18. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Personnel (con’t.)
      • Qualities of an effective training program
        • Clear objectives
        • Applicability to incident handling
        • Established proficiency level
        • Identification of potential hazards
        • Definition of acceptable risks
        • List of options, should something go wrong
        • Accountability to act as trained
  • 19. Figure 2-8 Injury and death statistics suggest that essential training subjects be addressed.
  • 20. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Personnel (con’t.)
      • Physical health support
        • Annual health screening
        • Vaccination and immunization offerings
        • Employee assistance programs
        • Fitness determination and program
        • Nutrition education
        • Effective rehabilitation strategies
  • 21. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Personnel (con’t.)
      • Mental health support
        • Provide training of critical incident stress signs and symptoms
        • Activate CISD (critical incident stress debriefing) team as necessary
        • Include firefighter’s family in department events
        • Make EAP available for job stress or family issues
  • 22. Safety in the Operational Environment (con’t.)
    • Personnel (con’t.)
      • Attitude is affected by:
        • Department’s safety culture
        • Department history of no duty-firefighters or significant injuries
        • Department’s death or injury history
        • Example set by line officers or firefighters
      • Attitude changes are slow and often emotional
  • 23. Risk Management
    • Risk
      • Chance of damage, injury, or loss
    • Risk management
      • Process of minimizing chance, degree, or probability of damage, injury, or loss
      • Most risk managers use a five-step process called classic risk management
  • 24. Risk Management (con’t.)
    • Five-step risk management
      • Hazard identification
        • Primary function of ISO
      • Hazard evaluation
        • Frequency: probability that an injurious event can happen
        • Severity: harmful consequence or cost associated with injury or damage from a given hazard
  • 25. Figure 2-10 A recognized hazard should be placed in one of these boxes based on the potential severity and frequency of the hazard.
  • 26. Risk Management (con’t.)
    • Five-step risk management (con’t.)
      • Hazard prioritization
        • Divide hazard matrix into three classes
      • Hazard control
        • Avoidance
        • Hazard transfer
        • Hazard adaptation: mitigation
      • Monitoring hazards
        • Cyclic thinking
  • 27. Figure 2-11 Once a hazard is classified in one of these boxes, a priority can be assigned to it. This helps the ISO juggle multiple hazards.
  • 28. Risk Management (con’t.)
    • Risk/Benefit thinking
      • Are the risks being taken by people worth the benefit that can be gained?
      • A good ISO continually reassesses risk versus benefit
  • 29. Summary
    • An effective ISO
      • Has a solid foundation in general safety concepts and risk management
      • Appreciates the roles of workplace procedures, equipment, and personnel
      • Achieves a safe workplace through evaluation and improvement
        • Improvement in attitude is especially difficult
  • 30. Summary (con’t.)
    • Risk management
      • Process of minimizing chance, degree, or probability of damage, injury, or loss
      • Most common approach: five-step classic risk management model
      • Continual monitoring of tasks
      • Application of risk/benefit thinking

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