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Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election
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Analyzing Social Media in the 2008 Presidential Election

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Presented by SNCR Fellows Emily Metzgar, Ph.D. & Albert Maruggi …

Presented by SNCR Fellows Emily Metzgar, Ph.D. & Albert Maruggi
(2008)

Published in: News & Politics
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  • 1. + Social Media, Traditional Media & Election 2008 Emily Metzgar ~ SNCR Fellow, Indiana University Albert Maruggi ~ SNCR Sr. Fellow, Provident Partners 11/14/08 © 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi
  • 2. + Historic Election   First African-American major party candidate   First credible female candidate in the primaries   First female VP nominee for GOP© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 3. First election to resurrect a dying late night comedy show +11/14/08 © 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi
  • 4. + About This Research   Firstnational election with active social media & the ability to track it   Opportunity to compare social media with traditional media coverage of same topics/personalities/issues   Radian6 as one tool to track & assess social media & traditional media   We offer findings from a first, exploratory look at differences between social media & traditional media during the election© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 5. + Why Consider Social Media?   Students Got Election News from Social Media   Propelled by Internet, Barack Obama Wins Presidency   Blogged Down in the Past   Obama Won the Election – Not Social Media   Social Media Lessons from Election 2008   Election Day 2008: The Best Blogs & Social Media Resources© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 6. + Cause Célèbre   Obama Girl 11.6 million views   Yes We Can I.will.am 13 million views   McCain Campaign Celeb Envy Ads© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 7. + Observations on Campaign 2008 “The problem with the McCain campaign was not the age of the candidate. It was the age of the ideas dominating the campaign.” ~Arianna Huffington© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 8. + SNL & Sarah Palin  Now is Forever  Sarah Palin SNL YouTube search Page 1 = 44 million views  SNL has political agenda  Chevy Chase on Ford  Now SNL lives on-demand© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 9. + Comparing Mentions  Traditional media  Social Media  09/04/08 – 11/03/08  09/04/08 – 11/03/08  Candidate mentions  Candidate mentions  McCain: 143,611  McCain: 275,780  Obama: 160, 207  Obama: 271,400  Biden: 20,834  Biden: 266,523  Palin: 84, 714  Pailn: 270,266© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 10. + McCain & Related Topics Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 11. + Obama & Related Topics Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 12. + Comparison: Traditional Media McCain Obama© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 13. + Comparison: Social Media McCain Obama© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 14. + Palin & Related Topics Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 15. + Biden & Related Topics Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 16. + Comparison: Traditional Media Palin Biden© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 17. + Comparison: Social Media Palin Biden© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 18. + Comparing Mentions  Traditional Media  Social Media  09/04/08 – 11/03/08  09/04/08 – 11/03/08  Topic mentions  Topic mentions  Iran: 34, 316  Iran: 130,015  American economy: 204,258  American economy: 16,191  Joe the Plumber: 8176  Joe the Plumber: 46,178  Afghanistan: 66,774  Afghanistan: 125,650  Iraq: 86,458  Iraq: 280,473© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 19. + “Iran” & Related Mentions Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 20. + Trends in “Iran” Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 21. + “Economy” & Related Mentions Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 22. + Trends in “Economy” Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 23. + “Joe the Plumber” & Related Mentions Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 24. + Trends in “Joe the Plumber” Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 25. + “Afghanistan” & Related Mentions Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 26. + Trends in “Afghanistan” Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 27. + “Iraq” & Related Mentions Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 28. + Trends in “Iraq” Social Media Traditional Media© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 29. + Social Media as a Movement  Information Exchange  Freedom  Voice  Isn’t Social Media about Connecting?© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 30. + Preliminary Findings   Social media wasn’t about advertising a campaign message; it was about offering a mechanism for ongoing engagement.    Is the medium the message? (McLuhan). CV suggests yes. Evidence suggests no.   To the extent that SM got young voters to engaged in the campaign and to show up on Election Day, it played a role in the election outcome.   Although scale varied considerably, priority given to topics in TM was typically an accurate reflection of topics in SM. And vice versa.© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 31. + Preliminary Findings   Possible exceptions:   Issue that appears to have arisen from SM to TM was issue of Sarah Palin’s daughter’s pregnancy   The life cycle of debate-generated sound bites was typically short (see “that one”, “can I call you Joe?”, “John is right” & “Joe the Plumber”)   On big issues, SM & TM merge together. Why?   Big issues merge, smaller issues just don’t register   Traditional media so focused on covering social media, that it becomes a picture of me looking at me looking at me looking at me….© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 32. + Preliminary Findings   TM so plugged in, hard for an issue to emerge unnoticed in SM   On a related note, with the presidential election campaign actually very few issues that the campaigns were focused on, therefore from day-to-day, no dramatic deviation from major issues and associated talking points   From a topic perspective, SM not dramatically different than TM. From an organization and money standpoint, however, it was huge.© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 33. + Preliminary Findings   The Internet and social media caused “the death of Karl Rove politics,” by changing the nature of the environment in which the campaign was conducted (Arianna Huffington)   Socialmedia was a necessary -- but not sufficient -- factor in Senator Obama’s election victory   Other factors included characteristics of party hierarchy, ideas & issues at center of respective campaigns, and distance or lack thereof from current administration   The 1960 vs. 2008 comparison:   1960: Television gave power to campaigns   2008: Social media helps retake some of it   1960 & 2008: New media attracts & engages new populations© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 34. + New Questions   Does one source drive more of the discussion and coverage?   Is one source more influential than the other?   Are the two sources more alike than different?   What kinds of issues/themes emerge in traditional media then migrate into social media? And the reverse?   Is quality or quantity more important?   Incoming & outgoing links   Comments   Size & composition of audience   Overall “buzz”© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08
  • 35. + Contact Information Emily Metzgar Albert Maruggi Assistant Professor President, Provident Partners IU School of Journalism amaruggi@providentpartners.net emetzgar@indiana.edu Twitter: emilym123© 2008, Metzgar & Maruggi 11/14/08

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