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  • Licensed under a Creative Commons attribution-share alike license.http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0Scott McLeod, J.D., Ph.D.scottmcleod.net/contactdangerouslyirrelevant.orgschooltechleadership.orgOur kids have tasted the honey.www.flickr.com/photos/jahansell/251755048

Zionsvilleconnected educator Zionsvilleconnected educator Presentation Transcript

  • Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach Co-Founder & CEO Powerful Learning Practice, LLC http://plpnetwork.com sheryl@plpnetwork.com President 21st Century Collaborative, LLC http://21stcenturycollaborative.com Author The Connected Educator: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age Follow me on Twitter @snbeach
  • • THE CONNECTED EDUCATOR Housekeeping Get close to someone Paperless handouts http://plpwiki.com Back Channel Chat http://todaysmeet.com/gced13
  • My community work
  • Mantra for today’s keynote… We are stronger together than apart. None of us is as smart, creative, good or interesting as all of us.
  • • THE CONNECTED EDUCATOR Things do not change; we change. —Henry David Thoreau What are you doing to contextualize and mobilize what you are learning? How will you leverage, how will you enable your teachers or your students to leverage- collective intelligence?
  • Learner First— Educator Second Introduce yourselves to each other and brag a little. Talk about (in 2 min or less) the most recent or compelling connected learning project you have recently led, discovered, or been involved in. Emerson and Thoreau reunited would ask- ―What has become clearer to you since we last met?‖
  • Are you Ready for Learning and Leading in the 21st Century? It isn’t just ―coming‖… it has arrived! And schools who aren’t redefining themselves, risk becoming irrelevant in preparing students for the future.
  • The world is changing...
  • By the year 2011 80% of all Fortune 500 companies will be using immersive worlds – Gartner Vice President Jackie Fenn Libraries 2.0 Management 2.0 Education 2.0 Warfare 2.0 Government 2.0 Vatican 2.0 Credit: Hugh MacLeod, gapingvoid Everything 2.0
  • 6 Trends for the digital age Analogue Digital Tethered Mobile Closed Open Isolated Connected Generic Personal Consuming Creating Source: David Wiley: Openness and the disaggregated future of higher education
  • ―We are tethered to our always on/ always on us communication devices and the people and things we reach through them.‖ ~ Sherry Turkle
  • Web 1.0 Web 2.0 Web 3.0 We are living in a new economy – powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge. -- Futureworks: Trends and Challenges for Work in the 21st Century
  • Shifting From Shifting To Learning at school Learning anytime/anywhere Teaching as a private event Teaching as a public collaborative practice Learning as passive participant Learning in a participatory culture Learning as individuals Linear knowledge Learning in a networked community Distributed knowledge
  • Shift in Learning – The Possibilities Rethinking teaching and learning… 1. Multiliterate 2. Changing Demographic 3. Active Content Creators 4. Global Collaboration and Communication We are in the midst of seeing education transform from a book-based, linear system with a focus on individual achievement to an web-based, divergent system with a focus on community building.
  • dangeuslyirrelevant.org Our kids have tasted the honey. http://www.dangerouslyirrelevant.org/2009/02/a-taste-of-honey.html
  • 19 Free range learners Free-range learners choose how and what they learn. Self- service is less expensive and more timely than the alternative. Informal learning has no need for the busywork, chrome, and bureaucracy that accompany typical classroom instruction.
  • • THE CONNECTED EDUCATOR The Disconnect ―Every time I go to school, I have to power down.‖ --a high school student
  • What do we need to unlearn? The Empire Strikes Back: LUKE: Master, moving stones around is one thing. This is totally different. YODA: No! No different! Only different in your mind. You must unlearn what you have learned.
  • The pace of change is accelerating
  • It is estimated that 1.5 exabytes of unique new information will be generated worldwide this year. That’s estimated to be more than in the previous 5,000 years. Knowledge Creation
  • For students starting a four-year education degree, this means that . . . half of what they learn in their first year of study will be outdated by their third year of study.
  • Time Travel Lewis Perelman, author of School's Out (1992). Perelman argues that schools are out of sync with technological change: ...the technological gap between the school environment and the "real world" is growing so wide, so fast that the classroom experience is on the way to becoming not merely unproductive but increasingly irrelevant to normal human existence (p.215). Seymour Papert (1993) In the wake of the startling growth of science and technology in our recent past, some areas of human activity have undergone megachange. Telecommunications, entertainment and transportation, as well as medicine, are among them. School is a notable example of an area that has not(p.2).
  • Shift in Learning = New Possibilities Shift from emphasis on teaching… To an emphasis on co-learning
  • Shifts focus of literacy from individual expression to community involvement. Students become producers, not just consumers of knowledge.
  • Shifts focus of literacy from individual expression to community involvement.
  • Connected Learning The computer connects the student to the rest of the world Learning occurs through connections with other learners Learning is based on conversation and interaction Stephen Downes
  • Share Cooperate Collaborate Collective Action According to Clay Shirky, there are four steps on a ladder to mastering the connected world: sharing, cooperating, collaborating, and collective action. From his book- “Here Comes Everybody”
  • Connected Learner Scale Share (Publish & Participate) – Connect (Comment and Cooperate) – Remixing (building on the ideas of others) – Collaborate (Co-construction of knowledge and meaning) – Collective Action (Social Justice, Activism, Service Learning) –
  • Trend 1 – Social and intellectual capital are the new economic values in the world economy. This new economy will be held together and advanced through the building of relationships. Unleashing and connecting the collective knowledge, ideas, and experiences of people creates and heightens value. Source: Journal of School Improvement, Volume 3, Issue 1, Spring 2002 http://www.decs.sa.gov.au/wallaradistrict/files/links/Ten_Trends_Educating_Child.pdf
  • ―Schools are a node on the network of learning.‖
  • Personal Learning Networks Community-- in and out of the classroom Are you ―clickable‖- Are your students?
  • • THE CONNECTED EDUCATOR Professional development needs to change. We know this. A revolution in technology has transformed the way we can find each other, interact, and collaborate to create knowledge as connected
  • Do it Yourself PD A revolution in technology has transformed the way we can find each other, interact, and collaborate to create knowledge as connected learners. What are connected learners? Learners who collaborate online; learners who use social media to connect with others around the globe; learners who engage in conversations in safe online spaces; learners who bring what they learn online back to their classrooms, schools, and districts.
  • What is Do -It- Yourself Learning ?
  • What do you wonder… About connected learning? How do you define the terms? Let’s build a common language.
  • • THE CONNECTED EDUCATOR
  • • THE CONNECTED EDUCATOR
  • • THE CONNECTED EDUCATOR Meet the new model for professional development: Connected Learning Communities In CLCs educators have several ways to connect and collaborate: • F2F learning communities (PLCs) • Personal learning networks (PLNs) • Communities of practice or inquiry (CoPs)
  • • THE CONNECTED EDUCATOR 1. Local community: Purposeful, face-to-face connections among members of a committed group— a professional learning community (PLC) 2. Global network: Individually chosen, online connections with a diverse collection of people and resources from around the world—a personal learning network (PLN) 3. Bounded community: A committed, collective, and often global group of individuals who have overlapping interests and recognize a need for connections that go deeper than the personal learning network or the professional learning community can provide—a community of practice or inquiry (CoP)
  • • THE CONNECTED EDUCATOR Professional Learning Communities Personal Learning Networks Communities of Practice Method Often organized for teachers Do-it-yourself Educators organize it themselves Purpose To collaborate in subject area or grade leverl teams around tasks For individuals to gather info for personal knowledge construction and to bring back info to the community Collective knowledge building around shared interests and goals. Structure Team/group F2f Individual, face to face, and online Collective, face to face, or online Focus Student achievement Personal growth Systemic improvement
  • Community is the New Professional Development Cochran-Smith and Lytle (1999a) describe three ways of knowing and constructing knowledge… Knowledge for Practice is often reflected in traditional PD efforts when a trainer shares with teachers information produced by educational researchers. This knowledge presumes a commonly accepted degree of correctness about what is being shared. The learner is typically passive in this kind of "sit and get" experience. This kind of knowledge is difficult for teachers to transfer to classrooms without support and follow through. After a workshop, much of what was useful gets lost in the daily grind, pressures and isolation of teaching. Knowledge in Practice recognizes the importance of teacher experience and practical knowledge in improving classroom practice. As a teacher tests out new strategies and assimilates them into teaching routines they construct knowledge in practice. They learn by doing. This knowledge is strengthened when teachers reflect and share with one another lessons learned during specific teaching sessions and describe the tacit knowledge embedded in their experiences.
  • Community is the New Professional Development Knowledge of Practice believes that systematic inquiry where teachers create knowledge as they focus on raising questions about and systematically studying their own classroom teaching practices collaboratively, allows educators to construct knowledge of practice in ways that move beyond the basics of classroom practice to a more systemic view of learning. I believe that by attending to the development of knowledge for, in and of practice, we can enhance professional growth that leads to real change. Cochran-Smith, M., & Lytle, S.L. (1999a). Relationships of knowledge and practice: Teaching learning in communities. Review of Research in Education, 24, 249-305. Passive, active, and reflective knowledge building in local (PLC), global (CoP) and contextual (PLN) learning spaces.
  • Dedication to the ongoing development of expertise Shares and contributes Engages in strength-based approaches and appreciative inquiry Demonstrates mindfulness Willingness to leaving one's comfort zone to experiment with new strategies and taking on new responsibilities Dispositions and Values Commitment to understanding asking good questions Explores ideas and concepts, rethinking, revising, and continuously repacks and unpacks, resisting urges to finish prematurely Co-learner, Co-leader, Co-creator Self directed, open minded Commits to deep reflection Transparent in thinking Values and engages in a culture of collegiality
  • Use a 3-pronged Approach
  • The driving engine of the collaborative culture of a PLC is the team. They work together in an ongoing effort to discover best practices and to expand their professional expertise. PLCs are our best hope for reculturing schools. We want to focus on shifting from a culture of teacher isolation to a culture of deep and meaningful collaboration. Professional Learning Communities FOCUS: Local , F2F, Job-embedded- in Real Time
  • “Understanding how networks work is one of the most important literacies of the 21st Century.” - Howard Rheingold http://www.ischool.berkeley.edu How do you define networks?
  • A Definition of Networks From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Networks are created through publishing and sharing ideas and connecting with others who share passions around those ideas who learn from each other. Networked learning is a process of developing and maintaining connections with people and information, and communicating in such a way so as to support one another's learning. Connectivism (theory of learning in networks) is the use of a network with nodes and connections as a central metaphor for learning. In this metaphor, a node is anything that can be connected to another node: information, data, feelings, images. Learning is the process of creating connections and developing a network.
  • Personal Learning Networks FOCUS: Individual, Connecting to Learning Objects, Resources and People – Social Network Driven
  • responsive responsive
  • personalized
  • Use a 3-pronged Approach
  • What is community, really?
  • A Place to Build Trust and Relationships
  • A Domain of Interest
  • A Place to Meet
  • A Place to Construct Knowledge Collaboratively
  • CelebrationCelebration
  • A Community of Practice is a network of individuals with common problems or interests who get together to explore ways of working, identify common solutions, and share good practice and ideas. • puts you in touch with like-minded colleagues and peers • allows you to share your experiences and learn from others • allows you to collaborate and achieve common outcomes • accelerates your learning • Improves student achievement • validates and builds on existing knowledge and good practice • provides the opportunity to innovate and create new ideas
  • Looking Closely at Learning Community Design 4L Model (Linking, Lurking, Learning, and Leading) inspired by John Seeley Brown http://learningcircuits.blogspot.com/2006/06/roles-in-cops.html This model is developed around the roles and interactions members of a community have as participants in that community.
  • “Twitter and blogs ... contribute an entirely new dimension of what it means to be a part of a tribe. The real power of tribes has nothing to do with the Internet and everything to do with people.” Internet tribes ccSteveWheeler,UniversityofPlymouth,2010 “A tribe needs a shared interest and a way to communicate.”
  • The New Third Place? ―All great societies provide informal meeting places, like the Forum in ancient Rome or a contemporary English pub. But since World War II, America has ceased doing so. The neighborhood tavern hasn't followed the middle class out to the suburbs...‖ -- Ray Oldenburg
  • Change is hard
  • Connected learners are more effective change agents
  • An effective change agent is someone who isn’t afraid to change course.
  • Real Question is this: Are we willing to change- to risk change- to meet the needs of the precious folks we serve? Can you accept that Change (with a ―big‖ C) is sometimes a messy process and that learning new things together is going to require some tolerance for ambiguity.
  • Last Generation