Design Practise & Behavioral Economics

1,456 views
1,306 views

Published on

Talk by Stefan Müller at the HCI remixed class at FHP.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,456
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
30
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Design Practise & Behavioral Economics

  1. 1. Behavioral Economics & DesignStefan Müller, HCI Remixed
  2. 2. „In the early days of industrial design, the work was primarily focused upon physical products. Today, designers work on organizational structure and social problems on interaction, service, and experience design.... As a result, designers have become applied behavioral scientists, but they are woefully undereducated for the task.”Don Norman. 2010. „Why Design Education Must Change“. Core77.com
  3. 3. Dan Ariely: Predictably Irrational„Visual Illusions as a metaphor forirrationality (a.k.a. cognitive illusions)”
  4. 4. “We think that we make rational decisions. But most decisions actuallydon’t lie within us but within the people who end up designing the forms.”
  5. 5. “We think that we make rational decisions. But most decisions actuallydon’t lie within us but within the people who end up designing the forms.”
  6. 6. “We think that we make rational decisions. But most decisions actuallydon’t lie within us but within the people who end up designing the forms.”
  7. 7. 16%0%84%
  8. 8. 68% 32%The “useless” option actually helped people figure out what they wanted.We actually don’t know our preferences that well and are hence open to theseinfluences.
  9. 9. “What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god!” Will Shakespeare (Act II,scene 2, of Hamlet)Standard Economics
  10. 10. Behavioural Economics
  11. 11. “We build products that work with our physical limitations. Chairs, shoes, and cars are all designed to complement and enhance our physical capabilities...Behavioural Economics
  12. 12. ... If we take some of the same lessons we’ve learned from working with our physical limitations and apply them to things that are affected by our cognitive limitations—insurance policies, retirement plans, and healthcare— we’ll be able to design more effective policies and tools, that are more useful in the world...Behavioural Economics
  13. 13. ... This is the promise of behavioral economics – once we understand where we are weak or wrong we can try to fix it and build a better world.” Dan ArielyBehavioural Economics
  14. 14. Some examples...
  15. 15. UK Design Council’s RED Unit
  16. 16. UK Design Council’s RED Unit
  17. 17. HealthA RED project form 2005
  18. 18. HealthA RED project form 2005
  19. 19. HealthA RED project form 2005
  20. 20. HealthA RED project form 2005
  21. 21. HealthA RED project form 2005
  22. 22. ParticipleAddressing the big social issues of our time.
  23. 23. InWithFor“Our problem? Too many families-in-crisis, interfacing with state systems,and too few families thriving.”
  24. 24. Public Sector projects@ IDEO
  25. 25. Public Sector projects@ IDEO
  26. 26. Public Sector projects@ IDEO
  27. 27. Social Innovation@ frog“Mobile technology as a accelerator of positive social change”
  28. 28. Social Design@ Think PublicWorking exclusively with the public sector, third sector and communities.
  29. 29. Social Design@ Think PublicWorking exclusively with the public sector, third sector and communities.
  30. 30. “We need a new form of design education, one with more rigor, more science, and more attention to the social and behavioral sciences, to modern technology, and to business. But we cannot copy the existing courses from those disciplines: we need to establish new ones that are appropriate to the unique requirements... of design.”Don Norman. 2010. „Why Design Education Must Change“. Core77.com
  31. 31. Ende

×