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Part 2. Leadership for the Principals of Inquiry-Based Schools. Part 1. Harvey "Smokey" Daniels ...

Part 2. Leadership for the Principals of Inquiry-Based Schools. Part 1. Harvey "Smokey" Daniels
Being an Instructional leader in a time of standards and high stakes assessments. Quick win # 1: written conversations with teachers and students.

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Macon.djs.may2014 Macon.djs.may2014 Presentation Transcript

  • QUICK WIN #1
  • Written Conversation Page 131
  • Letters from kids to teachers
  • Kid to Kid Letters
  • Kid to kid letters
  • OMG chem is so boring
  • It sux zzzzzz
  • How wuz eng test? g test? How wz Eng tst?
  • So hrd!
  • Hang after?
  • Only B4 band prac
  • OK, C U @ caf
  • XLNT, ltr
  • Turn and Talk What did you notice about these letters?
  • Put letters to work in the curriculum
  • I know what you’re thinking…
  • We have been trying to stamp out note-passing for generations!
  • But what if we legalized this?
  • Let’s try out a written conversation using a topic we all care about…
  • Form groups of three or four Bbbbbbbbb b Bbbbbbbb b
  • Use different color pens if possible Each partner grab an index card or piece of paper and write a Salutation! Dear Friends, Dear Ben, Ali, and Chuck. Dear Posse,
  • 1. Write legibly. 2. Cross out and go. 3. Use all the time I give you. 4. No talking. RULES OF WRITTEN CONVERSATION
  • WHAT I LOOK FOR IN A CLASSROOM --Teacher actions and attitudes --Student actions and attitudes --Materials and supplies --Room setup, displays, work samples --Curriculum, subject matter --Time allocations --Climate, interaction, relationships --Assessment and accountability
  • Write a note to your colleagues. I will give you about two minutes.
  • WHAT I LOOK FOR IN A CLASSROOM --Teacher actions and attitudes --Student actions and attitudes --Materials and supplies --Room setup, displays, work samples --Curriculum, subject matter --Time allocations --Climate, interaction, relationships --Assessment and accountability
  • There are just 15 seconds of writing time left, so finish the thought you are working on.
  • Now it’s time to “mail” your letters. Everyone pass your letters to the left!
  • What do you do when you get a letter? Right, you read it, of course. Then what? Exactly, you answer it!
  • After you have read the letter, right underneath where your partner left off, write a response. What could you say? --make a comment --share a connection --ask a question --agree and give reasons --disagree and give reasons --make an illustration
  • GO! You have a minute and a half to answer your partner. You can… . --make a comment --share a connection --ask a question --agree and give reasons --disagree and give reasons --make an illustration Just keep the conversation going!!
  • There are just 15 seconds of writing time left, so finish the thought you are working on.
  • Stop writing and pass your letters to the left again. Now look - something is different this time. You have two letters to read and respond to. So this time we’ll take a little more reading and writing time. You can answer one partner, or the other one, or say something to both of them.
  • GO! You have two minutes to answer your partners. Keep that conversation going….
  • There are just 15 seconds of writing time left, so finish the thought you are working on.
  • Now we are going to switch to out-loud discussion. First, pass your papers so everyone gets back the one they started. Now read and enjoy what people said in response to the initial comments you wrote about 5 minutes ago.
  • Now reread everyone’s notes and mark the one most interesting, unusual, or debatable sentence that anyone wrote. This should be something you’d like to talk about further with your group. Put a star beside that sentence.
  • Now we you can continue the discussion out loud. Jump right in and talk about the text. If you need a place to begin, have someone read aloud their chosen “important sentence” and begin your discussion with that.
  • Let’s come back together and discuss this topic and the process. First, let’s hear some highlights from your written and spoken discussions. What where the big ideas about the topic that came up? What did you spend time on? What did you agree or debate about?
  • This is a tool we can use over and over. Thank your write-around buddies for their letters and great ideas today.
  • Brad’s Message Board
  • BeauB Tajah Emma Luke
  • Solve the following equation, show all the steps, and check your solution. -2x + 7 = 11 Solve the following inequality, show all the steps, and check your solution. -2x + 7 < 11 When you have finished solving and checking your solutions, have a dialogue journal with your partner, comparing and contrasting the processes and the solutions to the equation and the inequality.
  • PAIR 1 I noticed that these two problems were similar because most of both of the problems followed the same rules. I noticed that too, but the inequality had some extra rules. Yeah you know you have a good point. I noticed the difference in these problems was that for the second one the check is a little bit harder ‘cause unlike #1 you have to check by using two #s. Yeah, but it was still easy for me to remember the rules of it. Well, it’s harder for me because I am a tad bit slower in learning, but I get your drift.
  • PAIR 3 The difference between two inequalities were that in the first one only one answer could be right and the second one any number greater than -2 was right. The first problem was an equation, not an inequality! Oh so what! You know what I meant! No, actually I was like “what is she talking about?” Get it right Lauren! They are different. You get an answer with an equation and a bunch of possible answers with an inequality. You use a graph with an inequality like this. You’re a jerk! Nope, just smart!
  • Oct 5, 2011 | Reply | Public | Tag Me to Language Arts -201-, Language Arts -203- Homework: 10.5.11 Reading: 30 mins SS: Truman Doctrine/Iron Curtain Speech Article FILES ATTACHED Question sheet and hypothesis #1 Who was responsible for the Cold War? Science: Bibliography, hypothesis Math: None XC MEET TOMORROW AND NO PRACTICE ON FRIDAY. truman_on_greece.docx Preview coldwardocs.docx Preview
  • Sonali C. - I think Henry Wallace was trying to turn American into a communist country.  But, in all serious terms, I think Wallace was obviously on Novikov's side and I think it was wrong too, as he wasn't being patriotic to his own country (not saying everyone is. I'm not.) Maybe its because I'm an American, but I honestly think that America has its best intentions trying to make the world more peaceful. (besides George Bush.) I think they do want more countries to be democratic but they don't want take over the world like the Soviet Union. Oct 6, 2011 | Edit | Delete
  • Max S. - i disagree. I actually think that he wasn't. Throughout his speech, he had the same idea as Novikov, he thought that america just wanted power, which is what totalitarians want. Oct 6, 2011 | Edit | Delete Teagan L. - it was summarized, Max! His actual speech is probably a lot longer! Oct 6, 2011 | Edit | Delete
  • Emmy S. - I think that there's a difference between being unpatriotic and disagreeing with some things that are happening in government. I don't think that Henry Wallace was purposely being unpatriotic; he was speaking out about what he thinks is wrong with the way the U.S. was acting during this time. If he was the Vice President, he wouldn't want America to completely change what it believes. I think he deserves more credit. It's really hard to stand up for what you believe in, or to give your opinion when you think someone or something is wrong. I see his speech as more of a, I don't know, wake up call, telling about how the U.S. might be portrayed to other countries. I don't think he would completely turn on his own country and it's beliefs. Oct 6, 2011 | Edit | Delete
  • Isabel L. - i think i agree with Max. if you look at what Henry Wallace says, would you trust the U.S? Both sides wanted to spread their kind of government. Imagine what both situations were. If you are the Soviet Union, you want power, and "the fruits of war" but your opponent has atomic bombs! And if you are the U.S, you just really want to maintain countries democracies and build and rebuild new ones. I agree with all of you that i think it was both theie faults, but whose do you think is was PRIMARILY? Oct 6, 2011 | Edit | Delete
  • Alejandro S. - But still c'mon, a lot of you people really need to re-read the Wallace speech. He isn't on the communist side, he doesn't want to spread communism, and he isn't on the Soviet Union’s side either. Wallace is basically saying that we look terrible in the eyes of the world. The U.S. used the atomic bomb to basically trash all of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, they entered World War 2 at the very last minute! The US was basically the game changer in war. He's saying that we are doing all these bad things and intimidating the rest of the world so they don't mess with us or are at least on our side.
  • Sonali - Wallace’s speech is a wake up call to the U.S to tell us all how we are portrayed by other countries which probably is the bully scaring other countries and trying to force Democracy on them like the Soviet Union is trying to force Communism on other countries Oct 6, 2011 | Edit | Delete
  • TEXT ON TEXT
  • Deborah Henderson VIDEO
  • QUICK WIN #1 Coach teachers with letters
  • Steve Renfro Kindergarten, Burley School, Chicago
  • In a minute, we will write Steve a coaching note
  • Five Sources of Authority Position/Title Rewards Punishments Friendship Expertise Group Processes in the Classroom Richard and Patricia Schmuck , 2000.
  • Five Sources of Authority Position/Title Rewards Punishments *Friendship *Expertise Group Processes in the Classroom Richard and Patricia Schmuck , 2000.
  • Praise Suggest More Praise Oreo Feedback System Content Area Writing, Daniels, Zemelman, and Steineke 2005.
  • WHAT DOES “SUGGEST” MEAN? “Here’s another resource...” “A cool next step might be….” “The kids might be wondering...” “When I’ve taught this…” “Let me send you a link…” “This reminded me of…” “Here’s a question I had…”
  • Write Steve a coaching note
  • Who can share their note?
  • Acquaintance Friendship Supportive Classroom Behavior
  • To Inquiry
  • The Best Kept Teaching Secret
  • *Written Conversations *Mini-Memos *Dialogue Journals * Write-Arounds *Silent Literature Circles * Digital Discussions
  • WRITTEN CONVERSATION Discussion of academic content using letters - notes, memos, journal entries, emails, texts or other forms of correspondence… ….created and exchanged among small groups of students, or between students and teacher.
  • Whole-Class Discussion
  • The Dream
  • The Reality
  • WRITING STANDARDS Builds fluency, clarity, confidence. Practice in expository and argumentative modes. Short research projects. READING STANDARDS Supports student thinking about complex fiction and nonfiction text. Provides tools for closer reading. Makes student thinking and comprehension visible. SPEAKING AND LISTENING STANDARDS Develop and support a point of view; use evidence; engage in discussion and debate. Anticipate opposing points of view. LANGUAGE STANDARDS Real audience helps improve correctness, editing, standard English, spelling, conventions of written genres.
  • Now let’s talk about the write-around. How is discussing in writing different from talking out-loud in a small group meeting? Let’s make a list of how written discussion compares to out-loud group discussions. Out Loud Written
  • Hang in there, Super Principals HDanielsNM@Gmail.com