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Time management strategies

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  • 1. The challenge is not to manage time, but to manage ourselves The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Steven Covey 1
  • 2. To Begin with the End in Mind • What is your mission here? • What is your role? • What are your goals? • To obtain an engineering degree • A student • To pass all courses the first time. 2
  • 3. To Begin with the End in Mind • Setting priorities each day • Planning each morning for the rest of the day • Planning in your study time – shoot for 4 hours a day • Daily adapting, of prioritizing activities and responding to unanticipated events, relationships, and experiences (Stephen Covey) 3
  • 4. Time Management Techniques: • make a daily and a weekly to-do list at the beginning of each week • prioritize the to do-list and start on the highest priority items first • break large projects into manageable segments on the to-do list • check items off as you complete them • plan for study time and personal time; set deadlines for to-do list items to be completed Methods: • set time limits for math problems; if you can’t solve a problem within the limit, seek help • if fear of failure leads to procrastination, set aside that fear and start the task; you can always ask for help • handle each item once; try to finish the tasks the first time you attempt them • when you finish, reward yourself! You deserve credit for your work 4
  • 5. Organize a schedule –Set realistic timelines and goals –Semester Planners • Include all exams, homework, project due-dates, quizzes, field trips, etc. –Weekly Planners • Classes, study time for your classes each day, social time, club meetings, etc. • Study in one or two hour time blocks. 5
  • 6. A powerful way of thinking about your priorities The Urgent/Important Matrix - Using it helps you overcome the natural tendency to focus on urgent activities, so that you can keep clear enough time to focus on what's really important. Urgent and Important • There are two distinct types of urgent and important activities: Ones that you could not foresee, and others that you've left to the last minute. You can avoid last-minute activities by planning ahead and avoiding procrastination. Issues and crises, on the other hand, cannot always be foreseen or avoided. Here, the best approach is to leave some time in your schedule to handle unexpected issues and unplanned important activities. (If a major crisis arises, then you'll need to reschedule other events.) If you have a lot of urgent and important activities, identify which of these could have been foreseen, and think about how you could schedule similar activities ahead of time, so that they don't become urgent. • - see more at: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newHTE_91.htm#sthash.jpWRpJ6J.dpuf 6
  • 7. Eisenhower Matrix • Eisenhower's quote, "What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important," sums up the concept of the matrix perfectly. This so-called "Eisenhower Principle" is said to be how Eisenhower organized his tasks. As a result, the matrix is sometimes called the Eisenhower Matrix. Covey brought the idea into the mainstream and gave it the name "The Urgent/Important Matrix" in his 1994 business classic, "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People." 7
  • 8. Importance of Priorities • The Urgent/Important Matrix helps you think about your priorities, and determine which of your activities are important, and which are, essentially, distractions. In this article, we'll look at how you can use the Urgent/Important Matrix to manage your time effectively. • - See more at: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newHTE_91.htm#sthash.qxBEt4tI.dpuf 8
  • 9. Time- Management Matrix 9
  • 10. What Are "Urgent" and "Important" Activities • Great time management means being effective as well as efficient. Managing time effectively, and achieving the things that you want to achieve, means spending your time on things that are important and not just urgent. To do this, and to minimize the stress of having too many tight deadlines, it's important to understand this distinction: • Important activities have an outcome that leads to the achievement of your goals, whether these are professional or personal. • Urgent activities demand immediate attention, and are often associated with the achievement of someone else's goals. • Urgent activities are often the ones we concentrate on; they demand attention because the consequences of not dealing with them are immediate. • - See more at: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newHTE_91.htm#sthash.qxBEt4tI.dpuf 10
  • 11. The Time Management Matrix Urgent Not Urgent I II Crises Pressing problems Deadline-driven projects RESULTS Stress, burnout, crisis management Always putting out fires Principle-Centered Planning RESULTS Vision, perspective Balance, discipline Control, few crises III IV Interruptions Some phone calls RESULTS Sees goals and plans as worthless Shallow relationships Feel out of control, victimized Trivia, busy work Phone calls IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT Total irresponsibility Fired from jobs Dependent on others for basics 11 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Steven Covey
  • 12. Principle-Centered 12 Mission statement Roles Goals Planning - Scheduling Roles Goals Weekly Organizing Long-Term Organizing
  • 13. The Importance of Spending most your time in Quadrant II Urgent Not Urgent I II Crises Pressing problems Deadline-driven projects RESULTS Stress, burnout, crisis management Always putting out fires Principle-centered Planning, balance Achieve your goals RESULTS Vision, perspective Balance, discipline Control, few crises IMPORTANT 13The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Steven Covey
  • 14. A new and growing body of multidisciplinary research shows that strategic renewal — including daytime workouts, short afternoon naps, longer sleep hours • Like time, energy is finite; but unlike time, it is renewable. 14 Tony Schwartz is the chief executive officer of The Energy Project and the author, most recently, of “Be Excellent at Anything.” Relax! You’ll Be More Productive was in the New York Times, 2-9-2013 Relax! You’ll Be More Productive
  • 15. The importance of restoration is rooted in our physiology. Human beings aren’t designed to expend energy continuously. Rather, we’re meant to pulse between spending and recovering energy. 15 Tony Schwartz is the chief executive officer of The Energy Project and the author, most recently, of “Be Excellent at Anything.” Relax! You’ll Be More Productive
  • 16. we sleep in cycles of roughly 90 minutes, moving from light to deep sleep and back out again. • The difference is that during the day we move from a state of alertness progressively into physiological fatigue approximately every 90 minutes. Our bodies regularly tell us to take a break, but we often override these signals and instead stoke ourselves up with caffeine, sugar and our own emergency reserves — the stress hormones adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol. 16 Tony Schwartz is the chief executive officer of The Energy Project and the author, most recently, of “Be Excellent at Anything.”
  • 17. • Professor K. Anders Ericsson and his colleagues at Florida State University have studied elite performers, including musicians, athletes, actors and chess players. In each of these fields, Dr. Ericsson found that the best performers typically practice in uninterrupted sessions that last no more than 90 minutes. • They begin in the morning, take a break between sessions, and rarely work for more than four and a half hours in any given day. 17 Working in 90-minute intervals turns out to be a prescription for maximizing productivity.
  • 18. • To maximize gains from long-term practice,” Dr. Ericsson concluded, “individuals must avoid exhaustion and must limit practice to an amount from which they can completely recover on a daily or weekly basis.” • Along the way, I learned that it’s not how long, but how well, you renew that matters most in terms of performance. 18 Tony Schwartz is the chief executive officer of The Energy Project and the author, most recently, of “Be Excellent at Anything.”
  • 19. • Even renewal requires practice. The more rapidly and deeply I learned to quiet my mind and relax my body, the more restored I felt afterward. For one of the breaks, I ran. This generated mental and emotional renewal, but also turned out to be a time in which some of my best ideas came to me, unbidden. 19 Tony Schwartz is the chief executive officer of The Energy Project and the author, most recently, of “Be Excellent at Anything.”
  • 20. Managing your energy more skillfully • By managing energy more skillfully, it’s possible to get more done, in less time, more sustainably. … Our secret is simple — and generally applicable. When we’re renewing, we’re truly renewing, so when we’re working (studying), we can really work (study). 20 Tony Schwartz is the chief executive officer of The Energy Project and the author, most recently, of “Be Excellent at Anything.”