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Session 5 p pa

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    Session 5 p pa Session 5 p pa Presentation Transcript

    • ESL 4-8 GeneralistsSession 5: Writing
      Wednesday, November 3, 2010
    • Parking Lot
      • DEFINE writing as it relates to the ELA content domain.
      • RECOGNIZEpredictable stages in the development of writing conventions.
      • APPLY developmentally appropriate, research-based instructional strategies and sequences to teach writing to all students, including ELLs.
      • USE diagnostic tools and ongoing assessment to gauge student performance in writing and to inform future instruction.
      • RECOGNIZE opportunities to teach writing across the content domains.
      • ARTICULATE the reciprocal nature of reading and writing. PLAN concrete lessons convey this reciprocity to students.
      • RESEARCH strategies proven effective to teach writing and plan to implement new strategies in the classroom.
    • Writing Defined
    • Defining Writing
      • Refer to HO 5.2 (pg 201), the article you read prior to class & underlined/highlighted/circled key info.
      • Share your insights/thoughts with your table group as they reference the following questions:
      • How does this definition help you understand writing and its connection to the content domain in a deeper way?
      • When and how will you discuss writing with students to help them understand its connection to the ELA content domain or other content domains?
    • Defining Writing
      • Now pair up…in your group you should have someone who teaches self-contained, ELA, or social studies…where writing is traditionally taught & someone who does not traditionally teach writing.
      • Complete HO 5.3 as a group
      • Be sure to refer to the TEKS (standards) and the local curriculum resource
    • transition
      • Student and teacher attitudes toward writing play a KEY role in the development of writing competencies across the content domains.
      • Remember that reading and writing are reciprocal processes. Strategies from Sessions 3 and 4 apply to successful teaching of writing.
      • ELA teachers ARE NOT the only ones responsible for teaching writing. Students should write in every content domain. You are responsible for communicating with your colleagues about the progress of students in writing in all of their classes.
      • DEFINE writing as it relates to the ELA content domain.
      • RECOGNIZEpredictable stages in the development of writing conventions.
      • APPLY developmentally appropriate, research-based instructional strategies and sequences to teach writing to all students, including ELLs.
      • USE diagnostic tools and ongoing assessment to gauge student performance in writing and to inform future instruction.
      • RECOGNIZE opportunities to teach writing across the content domains.
      • ARTICULATE the reciprocal nature of reading and writing. PLAN concrete lessons convey this reciprocity to students.
      • RESEARCH strategies proven effective to teach writing and plan to implement new strategies in the classroom.
      • We will count off 1-2-3…creating 3 groups.
      • Group One will read quote 1, Group Two-Quote 2, and Group Three-Quote 3
      • These quotes are from 2 seminal books on literacy instruction:
      • The Art of Teaching Writingby Lucy Calkins
      • In the Middleby Nancie Atwell.
      * seminal (adj.): containing seeds of later development
      Gallery Walk
      • STEP 1: After reading your assigned quote, use the sticky notes provided to: write your reactions to the quote (or to the comments left by previous participants), write connections to YOUR students, connections to what YOU have learned so far in this course.
      • STEP 2: Repeat step 1…but this time you are referencing the next quote (Group 1 reads Quote 2, Group 2 reads Quote 3, Group 3 reads Quote 1)
      • STEP 3: Repeat above…but now you are on the last quote.
      3 minutes for each step – lights will flicker
      Gallery Walk
    • Easy way to have groups respond to text and to each other.
      How will you use this in your class?
      Add to HO 1.13 strategy sheet!
      Gallery Walk
    • Writing past the elementary level has traditionally involved a great deal of academic writing—writing for the teacher as the sole audience. Think of the essays and research papers you probably wrote in high school.
      A teacher’s job is to create systems and structures that allow students to master the standards while at the same time writing for varied and authentic audiences on personally relevant topics.
    • Key Points
      14
      Students need to pay attention to their own lives to get ideas for writing
      Students need to have real audiences for their writing
      Students need a repertoire of strategies to use when writing for different purposes, and TEACHERS must provide these strategies!
    • Comparing Criteria for Different Genres of Writing
      Good early-adolescent writing is characterized by several common traits:
      Ideas & Content
      Organization
      Voice
      Word Choice
      Sentence Fluency
      Conventions
    • K-12 Writing Continuum
    • The 6 Traits Scoring Guide
      The top row of each column defines each trait.
      Note that the scoring guide uses a five-point scale to rate each element of student writing.
      A 5 represents proficiency (which is defined for each element) and a 1 indicates the writing is poor (also defined in the scoring guide) in relation to that element.
      Handout 5.4
    • 18
      The 6 Traits Scoring Guide
      • Note that the scoring guide uses a 5 point scale to rate each element of student writing
      • This is a tool to measure effective writing.
      • If you teach other content domains, you can use this in combination with other tools that measure proficiency in other skills. (i.e. problem-solving in math, experimental design in science, etc.)
      • The 6 Traits Scoring Guide should be used in addition to, or in connection with, other scoring tools, and participants should be careful not to confuse student proficiency or lack of proficiency in other areas with student writing level.
    • TAKS Writing Tests
      • Fourth Grade
      • Seventh Grade
      • Tenth Grade
      • Exit Level
    • TAKS Writing Rubric
    • TAKS Writing Rubric Matrix
    • Kid Friendly Rubric
    • See HO 5.2 (pg 202)
      Expository/Research
      Literary Response
      Persuasive
      Narrative
      Genres of Writing
    • Make sure you are clear on what YOUR content standards require….as well as what is required in the ELA standards at your grade level, the previous grade level, the next level…in order to support students have learned, should be learning and what they will be learning.
      24
      Genres of Writing
    • 25
      Review the criteria charts on HOs 5.5-5.5c (pg 206-209)
      In your table group discuss the similarities and differences and complete the Venn diagram on HO 5.6 (pg 210) to show criteria they share.
      You have 10 minutes to complete the activity.
      Genres of Writing
    • Genres
      What surprised you about the diagram?
      26
    • 27
      • Looking at the ELA content domain poster and the Venn diagram, how might you structure your planning to teach for master of each standard?
      • If you teach another content domain, how can instruction in your content support students’ writing development in the genres?
      Noticing where there is overlap among genres can help eliminate reteaching the same idea; immersing students in reading and analyzing the features of a genre can dovetail with students writing in that genre; reinforcing what students are learning in ELA in other content areas can create more authenticity for students and make writing instruction feel more consistent for students.
    • Why is it important to know and to help students see similarities and differences among genres?
      We can help students connect by looking back at the same criteria in a previous text we read or in their own writing before they get ready to write in a new genre. This could impact our pacing as well: We can focus on narrative before asking students to write literary analysis, for example, or expository writing before persuasive writing.
      28
    • Criteria charts list the standards to be met, while rubrics describe various levels of mastery of the standards. Criteria charts like the descriptors for the highest score on a rubric, guide us by giving specifics on how to be successful. Rubrics help students and teachers to quantify progress and growth over time and to defi ne how close to the standard a piece is.
      29
      What is the difference between a criteria chart and a rubric? What is the value of each?
    • Why are criteria charts and rubrics an important aspect of writing instruction?
      How might they help with student motivation?
      Criteria charts help students internalize the elements of a particular genre about which they are writing and see what is unique to the genre. As we have discussed in previous sessions, adolescents are developing more self-regulation and control in monitoring their own strengths and areas for growth academically. Using criteria charts and rubrics with students is a helpful way to help them assess their own writing and growth areas as writers.
      30
    • transition
      • Throughout the rest of the course, we will look for opportunities in the curriculum to integrate the different writing genres with instruction.
      • The criteria charts we examined could be used to assess student writing or published text, and we can show students how to strengthen their writing instruction by helping them pay attention to what makes good writing good as they are reading.
      • We will now look at the how to diagnose and assess writing in the classroom in an authentic way.
      • DEFINE writing as it relates to the ELA content domain.
      • RECOGNIZEpredictable stages in the development of writing conventions.
      • APPLY developmentally appropriate, research-based instructional strategies and sequences to teach writing to all students, including ELLs.
      • USE diagnostic tools and ongoing assessment to gauge student performance in writing and to inform future instruction.
      • RECOGNIZE opportunities to teach writing across the content domains.
      • ARTICULATE the reciprocal nature of reading and writing. PLAN concrete lessons convey this reciprocity to students.
      • RESEARCH strategies proven effective to teach writing and plan to implement new strategies in the classroom.
    • 33
      “The single biggest barrier to improving classroom assessment has nothing to do with the physical aspects of assessment at all (such as selecting the correct assessment method, making sure that there is only one correct answer, etc.). The biggest barrier is not having clear learning targets for students. One can’t assess (or teach) something if one doesn’t know with crystal clarity what it is they are trying to assess (or teach).”
      Education Northwest, http://www.nwrel.org/assessment/toolkit98/Act1-2.html
      Diagnosing and Assessing Writing
    • 34
      Take notes on 5.7 as you listen to the following information…you may work with a partner
    • 35
      When doing an activity like this with your class, what might you do to make sure
      they get all of the information they need?
      In what ways could you use graphic organizers and pair summarizing to increase effectiveness of note taking in your classrooms?
      Add this note-taking strategy to HO 1.13.
    • 36
      Publishing Student Writing
      • Notice that publishing has NOT been included in the previous graphic organizer about writing assessment.
      • What is the purpose of publishing student writing?
      It is our goal to guide our students to be writers. Writers need to feel that their voices are being heard. Too often, students only “publish” their writing after a month or two of going through the revision process, and only for the goal of it being formally assessed by the teacher. The purpose of publishing is not assessment—it is a way to continuously help students feel motivated to write.
    • What are some informal ways for students to publish their writing?
      sharing a draft out loud,
      sending a letter
      posting their writing on a blog or Web page
      posting an excellent line on the bulletin board
      37
    • Is there any role that publishing might play in a content area other than ELA? What might it be?
      Students in science class might benefit from publishing their experimental data so that a dialogue might take place among students.
      Persuasive essays in social studies could reveal student thought processes and reasoning that were not obvious through class discussions and/or exams.
      Publishing written explanations to complex math problems could demonstrate to students that there are multiple methods and/or solutions to a given problem.
      38
    • Refer to HO 5.8 (pg 212) Go Public! Ideas for Publishing Student Writing…Circle 2 of the ideas you would like to try this year.
      Though not a formal assignment for this course, you should keep in mind the aims of publishing and the role of publishing in motivation as you teach writing.
      39
    • 40
      Using Initial Diagnostics in Writing
      Remember that you should be almost finished collecting baseline fluency data for your students using the ORFs. This data should be collected, recorded on the data tracker, & brought to class for Session 6, November 17th.
      We will also do a writing diagnostic component to the inquiry process. You will be administering a “cold write” initial diagnostic to your students. Purpose: Collect data on the present level of performance of your students in writing.
    • Unlike the ORF, YOU will develop your own writing diagnostic & rubric
      • Remember the 6 Traits Scoring Guide (HO 5.4 pg 204) and TAKS Rubric
      • Remember the genre criteria on HO 5.5 (pg 206)
      Sample expository and narrative rubrics can be found on HO 5.10 (pg 215)
      Refer to HO 5.9 (pg 214)
      Look at the LONG TERM…stay ahead…don’t wait until the last minute!
      41
    • transition
      • You have now had an overview of how writing fits into the content domains, what types of writing middle grade students are expected to do, and how this writing might be assessed.
      • The next section will provide strategies for teaching writing that have been proven effective for boosting student achievement in writing.
      • DEFINE writing as it relates to the ELA content domain.
      • RECOGNIZEpredictable stages in the development of writing conventions.
      • APPLY developmentally appropriate, research-based instructional strategies and sequences to teach writing to all students, including ELLs.
      • USE diagnostic tools and ongoing assessment to gauge student performance in writing and to inform future instruction.
      • RECOGNIZE opportunities to teach writing across the content domains.
      • ARTICULATE the reciprocal nature of reading and writing. PLAN concrete lessons convey this reciprocity to students.
      • RESEARCH strategies proven effective to teach writing and plan to implement new strategies in the classroom.
    • 44
      Strategies
      • The strategies on HO 5.12 (pg 221-228) are part of a meta-analysis that was done by The Center for Comprehensive School Reform & Improvement (2007) as part of a project called Writing Next. A meta-analysis combines the results of several related research studies; in this case, the studies were all about the effectiveness of writing instruction for adolescents.
      • The results highlight the top 11 strategies that were shown to have the largest impact on student performance in writing. This means that even the last strategy on the list had a significant impact because only PROVEN effective strategies were highlighted in the meta-analysis.
    • strategies
      • What writing strategies have WE practiced in this course so far?
      • Free writes
      • Pre-writing in graphic organizers
      • Written reflections
      • Formal writing (your course assessments)
      • Writing to demonstrate knowledge of a concept
    • strategies
      Refer to HO 5.11 (pg 220)
      Complete the 1st column of the journal listing strategies and activities YOU have used with YOUR students at school (3 minutes)
      Share with a neighbor (Pair-sharing is an effective pre-writing strategy)
      Share with the big group
    • strategies
      This double-entry journal is an instructional strategy that helps students reflect on their own learning…as it is happening (HO 5.11)
      • A good way to develop metacognitive processes that students will need to self-monitor as they advance in school
      The way you implement writing may differ if you are using a scripted curriculum.
    • strategies
      Which strategies shared would only be appropriate/relevant for ELA content domain…which could be used in any content domain?
      Now work with your partner to list what characteristics of column 1 make the strategies appropriate for grades 4-8.
    • strategies
      Your next Strategy Implementation Plan (HO 5.13 & HO 5.14, pg 229-233) is due by Session 6, November 17th.
      • Reminder---in selecting a strategy, you should consider the objectives and TEKS/standards toward which you are currently working, as well as your students’ needs
    • strong examples
    • The Bluest Eye
      “Our house is old, cold, and green. At night a kerosene lamp lights one large room. The others are braced in darkness, peopled by roaches and mice. Adults do not talk to us -- they give us directions. They issue orders without providing information. When we trip and fall down they glance at us; if we cut or bruise ourselves, they ask us are we crazy. When we catch colds, they shake their heads in disgust at our lack of consideration. How, they ask us, do you expect anybody to get anything done if you all are sick? We cannot answer them. Our illness is treated with contempt, foul Black Draught, and castor oil that blunts our minds.”
    • Lifting lines from
      shared writing, interactive writing, guided writing, independent writing
    • Lifting lines from
      shared writing, interactive writing, guided writing, independent writing
    • transition
      • Students should be receiving systematic instruction in writing—as well as reading—across the content domains.
      • Writing instruction should also be individualized. Some students will need intervention in order to meet the requirements of their grade-level standards in writing.
      • Work with colleagues to gather ideas and purposefully plan to incorporate writing instruction meaningfully into various content areas. Student achievement in writing should be a shared responsibility.
      • DEFINE writing as it relates to the ELA content domain.
      • RECOGNIZEpredictable stages in the development of writing conventions.
      • APPLY developmentally appropriate, research-based instructional strategies and sequences to teach writing to all students, including ELLs.
      • USE diagnostic tools and ongoing assessment to gauge student performance in writing and to inform future instruction.
      • RECOGNIZE opportunities to teach writing across the content domains.
      • ARTICULATE the reciprocal nature of reading and writing. PLAN concrete lessons convey this reciprocity to students.
      • RESEARCH strategies proven effective to teach writing and plan to implement new strategies in the classroom.
    • 56
      Closing
      • Choose 2 goals from the Session Goals and write (in your exit folder) one thing you learned about each in tonight’s session.
      • Share your key learning.
      • Any lingering questions?
    • 57
      • HO 1.13 additions
      • Learning carousel/gallery walk
      • Graphic organizer with paired summarizing
      • Previewing long-term assignments in a structured way
      • Double-entry journal
      Closing
    • 58
      • For Next Time
      • Bring completed ORF data & data tracker with appropriate sections completed
      • Read all of Session 6 information…highlighting & making notes where appropriate
      • HO 5.12 & 5.13 are due (use strategies from session 5)
      Closing