A Collaborative Experiential Course in Social Stratification On the Road in the Deep South
 
Service Learning
Bay St. Louis, MS
Partnerships
Service Project
Oral History
Media Coverage
Book Wishlist
Embedded Librarians
Technology Website
Wiki
Blog
Flickr
Post Trip Impacts
Selected Resources <ul><li>Giovanelli, L. (2007). On the road: Students come face-to-face with poverty, devastation in dee...
Contact Information <ul><li>Lynn S. Sutton Director, Z. Smith Reynolds Library Wake Forest University [email_address] </li...
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On the Road in the Deep South: A Collaborative Experiential Course in Social Stratification.

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Co-presenter with Lynn Sutton. Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching, Greensboro, NC. February, 2008.

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  • Introductions – Wake Forest 30 mi down road, describe Describe course: [Earl? Angie?] Social Stratification in the Deep South; 3 rd time offered, two weeks on a bus through Deep South, more than civil rights tour: lived experience that challenged students to question and examine the evidence of stratification (race, class and gender) that still typifies much of the South. 2007 version: 13 WFU students (including student athletes) 1 ASU student, 2 libns, 4 other staffers Trip themes: First: Alabama: exploring civil rights era locations and issues Mid: Bay St. Louis and NO: backdrop to study aftereffects of Katrina End: Mississippi Delta: unique geographic region – blues and agriculture and poverty
  • Google mash-up that Susan did showing map of our travels Winston-Salem, NC Birmingham, AL (16 th St Bapt Ch, Kelly Ingram Park,) Montgomery, AL (Southern Poverty Law Center, Civil Rights Museum) Selma, AL (Edmund Pettis Bridge, site Selma-Mont march) Bay St. Louis, MS (site of Katrina service project) New Orleans, LA (Lower 9 th Ward) Mississippi Delta (Cleveland, Clarksdale, Po Monkeys jook joint in home of the Blues, Parchman Prison, Tunica) Many, many stories to tell! (after the conference, over margaritas!)
  • ALA story: why Drs. Smith and Hattery wanted to work with a library post Katrina. Cab ride from airport during ALA conference in NO. Librarians committed to rebuilding libraries as a way to bring back communities. Came back and asked if we could help find a library to serve as site for service project.
  • Found Hancock County Library System, which was trying so hard to bring its community back to life. Hancock County at MS/LA state line where Katrina made landfall in Aug 2005. Miss did not get the attention that New Orleans did, but the devastation was perhaps even greater. Two years later this is what almost all of the waterfront in Bay St Louis still looks like.
  • Front of the library headquarters in BSL. Mural in background of Hurricane Camille, which before Katrina was the standard of all hurricane preparedness. Library serv ed as a central community service agency in the days immediately following Katrina. It housed the National Guard, distributed food stamps, and provided the only working toilets, air conditioning, and Internet access in the county in the days and weeks following the storm.
  • When we asked how we could help, they said they needed to preserve their community memory, having learned how precious and precarious It was after the storm. So they asked the students to work on things like their scrapbook collection, preserving historic postcards, digitizing local documents.
  • Perhaps the most interesting part of the service project was conducting oral histories of 12 individuals, all but one members of the library staff. These people had suffered the loss of their homes, family members, pets, cars, possessions, but had never really had the chance to tell their story. Students were trained in oral history techniques by the faculty and went through the IRB process before leaving NC. They were trained in use of the video equipment by Susan onsite.
  • It is still big news in Mississippi when people come to help after the storm. Local ABC affiliate in Biloxi came to film the students working onsite in the library.
  • Our group wished to do something tangible for the Hancock County library system and its citizens. We used the Wishlist feature of Alibris.com to list children’s books that were needed by the library system. Upon returning home, students wrote to family and friends, suggesting that they consider donating a book. I’m happy to report that every book on the list was purchased and shipped to the Hancock County libraries. Next, Susan will talk more about the Embedded Librarian concept and the instructional technology used in the course.
  • Introduction to the Idea of “Embedded Librarianship” What does the literature say? In current library literature, the term is most often used to describe two different models: electronic collaboration and physical presence. Most electronically embedded librarians are associated with online courses. The typical model for physical presence is the placement of librarians in close proximity to the clients they serve, for instance, locating librarian offices in the academic departments they serve rather than in the library (Shumaker and Tyler 2007). Typical Virtual services: Works with faculty to determine level of support needed/required Prepares electronic tutorials, guides, finding aids Monitors social networking space to offer assistance Outreach via IM and blogging Virtual: just in time, point of need Physical Proximity: Old model: departmental and branch libraries: new model: from library-centered to customer-centered. Materials stay centralized, collection moves to electronic, librarians help with technical and reference (combines high tech with high touch). Key: Collocation, whether physical or virtual, meeting the needs of the user at the point of need where ever that may be is critical to the embedded librarian service model Services for faculty: In-depth research Point of need: Ready reference Current awareness News alerting Our “Embeddedness” Served in the original sense of the concept: Adapted from use of “embedded journalist”, which described the assignment of reporters to join military units in 2003 Iraq invastion. New role: value acknowledged through traditional ways, this a wonderful opportunity to be a more visible and integral part of a course. Our assignment: Provide resource lists to assist students Technology support Plan and manage service component Full participants in the course: included in class discussions, wrote daily reflections
  • Goal: to create an online environment that was: Current on a daily basis (facilitate daily postings) Collaborative Allowed student input Provide an environment for family and friends to follow along virtually, particularly parents and colleagues. Site featured on WOW (University’s daily electronic news service) during our time away so it highlighted. Purpose of technology for the course: Wiki purpose: to put the content and have it open for all to add modify, etc. two training classes: steep learning curve, time frame too short for students to get a good comfort level, works well in other contexts, courses with longer timeframe. Blog: participatory, easy Author view: good for instructors to see if assignments done, good for family friends to key in on their person’s content. Subject tagging: made it easy to key in on particular issues discussed and places visited. Flickr: some students embraced, some not so much Collections/sets: helped categorize the images taken. Still very handy. To create a seamless environment, integrated all three applications. Google picked up flickr and blogs Google Maps: show if I can Oral History technology: On site training and recording. Post trip production by two of the students.
  • This is the content area. Syllabus Course information Participant Information Itinerary Resources Readings
  • Daily Reflections Sortable by Author and Subject Subjects created through category tagging; preset by me, open for additional tags to all Commenting encouraged. Blog: participatory, easy Author view: good for instructors to see if assignments done, good for family friends to key in on their person’s content. Subject tagging: made it easy to key in on particular issues discussed and places visited. Flickr: some students embraced, some not so much Collections/sets: helped categorize the images taken. Still very handy.
  • Flickr Pro Account Everyone had access to upload their own images, to put notes, comment, enhance Flickr: some students embraced, some not so much Collections/sets: helped categorize the images taken. Still very handy.
  • Winston Salem Journal Article C&amp;RL News Article ACRL IS Innovation Award (Association of College and Research Libraries, Instruction Section)
  • On the Road in the Deep South: A Collaborative Experiential Course in Social Stratification.

    1. 1. A Collaborative Experiential Course in Social Stratification On the Road in the Deep South
    2. 3. Service Learning
    3. 4. Bay St. Louis, MS
    4. 5. Partnerships
    5. 6. Service Project
    6. 7. Oral History
    7. 8. Media Coverage
    8. 9. Book Wishlist
    9. 10. Embedded Librarians
    10. 11. Technology Website
    11. 12. Wiki
    12. 13. Blog
    13. 14. Flickr
    14. 15. Post Trip Impacts
    15. 16. Selected Resources <ul><li>Giovanelli, L. (2007). On the road: Students come face-to-face with poverty, devastation in deep south. Winston-Salem Journal, from http://www.tiny.cc/Vb4nc </li></ul><ul><li>Hattery, A., & Smith, E. (2007). Social stratification in the new/old south: The influences of racial segregation on social class in the deep south. Journal of Poverty, 11(1), 55-81. </li></ul><ul><li>Shumaker, D., & Tyler, L. A. (2007, 6 June). Embedded library services: An initial inquiry into practices for their development, management, and delivery. Paper presented at the Special Libraries Association Annual Conference, Denver, CO. </li></ul><ul><li>Smith, S. S. & Sutton, L. S. (2008). Embedded librarians: On the road in the deep south. C & RL News, 69 (2). http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/crlnews/backissues2008/february08/embeddedlib.cfm </li></ul><ul><li>Social stratification in the deep south: Course wiki. (2007). from https://wiki.zsr.wfu.edu/social_stratification/ </li></ul>
    16. 17. Contact Information <ul><li>Lynn S. Sutton Director, Z. Smith Reynolds Library Wake Forest University [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Susan Sharpless Smith Head, Information Technology, Z. Smith Reynolds Library Wake Forest University [email_address] </li></ul>

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