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    Exploring effective instruction pdf Exploring effective instruction pdf Presentation Transcript

    • Math 6,7,8,9
    • “Teaching should be suchthat what is offered isperceived as a valuable giftand not as a hard duty” -A. Einstein
    •  “…the teacher has proven time and again to be the most influential school-related force in student achievement.” -Stronge, 2007 ASCD “Teaching, not teachers, is the critical factor “ -Bartalo, 2012
    • Before During After
    • Before: Our renewed Curriculum is based on a common framework and is world-class.
    • ..and: How will I activate priorknowledge? How will I engagelearners? How will I incorporatemathematical processes? How willI differentiate? What formativeassessment will I use? Do I need apreassessment? What will I dowith kids that already know?
    • · Determine what belongs up front. - Since students spend most oftheir days facing the front of the classroom, be very deliberate aboutwhat you place on the walls up front. Make this primetime spaceengaging, but not distracting. After all, all eyes should be on you, notnecessarily a colorful explosion of words and images that distract fromthe core instruction at hand. Beth Lewishttp://ritzel.siu.edu/courses/443s/classroom/chalkboard.htm http://www.ehow.com/how_7616186_use-chalkboard- effective-teaching-tool.html
    • Good teaching begins with clear learning targets from which teachers select appropriate instructional activities and assessments that help determine students’ progress on the learning targets. http://www.marzanoresearch.com/produ cts/catalog.aspx?product=18“I can”… http://supportingmath.wikispaces.com/M athematics+Support+K-12
    • Broad Areas of LearningMath GoalsMathematical Process Standards http://www.education.gov.sk.ca/math- curricula
    • Group Research and ShareConceptattainmentactivity
    • http://www.worksheetworks.com/miscellanea/graphic-organizers/frayer.html
    • http://www.livebinders.com/play/play/574194?tabid=f1fed886-6750-423e-9e90-c80a83723e10
    •  In your group, define elements of a strong lesson.
    •  How do we allow students to freely participate? Take ownership of their ideas Honour each others contributions? Understand that we need to make mistakes in order to learn? Respect each others’ opinions and ideas? Listen and dialogue with respect? Persist?
    • http://www.schrockguide.net/assessment -and-rubrics.htmlhttp://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=K43989&sp=yes&
    • What is effective instruction?
    •  Multiple differentiated practices 0.7 Metacognitive Strategies 0.69 Self verbalization and questioning 0.64 Teaching through Problem Solving 0.61 Teaching study skills 0.59 Direct Instruction 0.59 Questioning 0.46 Peer Tutoring 0.55 Mastery Learning 0.56 Concept Mapping 0.57 Worked Examples 0.57 Goal Setting 0.56 Advanced Organizers 0.41 Matching Learning Styles 0.41 Cooperative Learning 0.41 Computer Assisted instruction 0.37 Web based learning 0.18• SPDU, Supporting Equitable Outcomes for all Students; Understanding and Closing Achievement Gaps
    • “Success and Failure are notepisodes; they are trajectories”(blatantly plagiarized! Sorry!)What do we do when they don’t get it? Scaffolding: Model thinking, break down problems, provide the solution ahead of time to focus on process, start with easy steps Specify steps, model the steps, think aloud, provide cue sheets, guided examples, anchor charts Practice can offset cognitive overload by transferring learning to long term memory, creating automaticity and freeing up cognitive processing for learning and problem solving
    •  Guided notes Chunking information, including chunking across problems Interleaving worked examples Riccomini, 2012
    •  Summaries Collaborative constructing of meaning, concept mapping Conversations around assessment, co- creating criteria for assessment Gallery walk Group Hosting
    •  Planning for Learning Monitoring thinking and learning Reflecting on learning
    •  Thinking about how we think Our ability to be conscious of our own steps and strategies Reflect on and evaluate our own thinking Students of all ages and abilities can do it Teacher supports it through establishing classroom environment, allowing different approaches, reminding students to focus on learning, modeling metacognition -SPDU
    •  Settingand achieving goals is linked to a sense of satisfaction Leads to intrinsic motivation Improves motivation and engagement
    •  Multiple differentiated practices 0.7 Metacognitive Strategies 0.69 Self verbalization and questioning 0.64 Teaching through Problem Solving 0.61 Teaching study skills 0.59 Direct Instruction 0.59 Questioning 0.46 Peer Tutoring 0.55 Mastery Learning 0.56 Concept Mapping 0.57 Worked Examples 0.57 Goal Setting 0.56 Advanced Organizers 0.41 Matching Learning Styles 0.41 Cooperative Learning 0.41 Computer Assisted instruction 0.37 Web based learning 0.18• SPDU, Supporting Equitable Outcomes for all Students; Understanding and Closing Achievement Gaps
    • I am feeling… The most valuable thing… From here I can… I still wonder…
    •  Lets make a plan about a promise to ourselves and our students Together lets develop a list of reminders; things we’d like to walk by and notice every day to remind us of thoughtful planning and meaningful instruction. Leave this list with me.