Perspective Principles

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Perspective Principles

  1. 1. IMD09117 and IMD09118 Web Design and Development Unit 10 Shape, perspective and principles of design
  2. 2. Shape and texture Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Focussed on linking </li></ul><ul><li>Adds personality, interest without distracting </li></ul><ul><li>Square - stability, easy on a grid </li></ul><ul><li>Organic shapes - spontaneous, harder to program </li></ul>
  3. 3. Shape and texture Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Rectangular screen </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ubiquitous </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Softened by round edges </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What about PDAs, mobiles etc </li></ul>
  4. 4. Shape and texture Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>http://www.wz-berlin.de </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.sfmoma.org/ </li></ul>
  5. 5. Shape and texture Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Texture and patterns can provide tactile sense of the interface’s look and feel </li></ul><ul><li>Rough, rugged, smooth, organic, manmade </li></ul><ul><li>Geometric - precision. </li></ul><ul><li>Organic - haphazard </li></ul><ul><li>Be restrained to avoid over complexity </li></ul>
  6. 6. Shape and texture Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  7. 7. Shape and texture Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  8. 8. Shape and texture Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  9. 9. Shape and texture Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  10. 10. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Representing 3D objects on 2D surface </li></ul><ul><li>Linear or atmospheric/aerial </li></ul><ul><li>Adds interest </li></ul><ul><li>Achieved by relative size of objects, overlapping objects, blurring or sharpening of objects, lines meeting at a point. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>The horizon line is a theoretical line that represents the eye level of the observer. </li></ul><ul><li>The horizon itself might be above the horizon line if there are trees or other features on the actual horizon. </li></ul><ul><li>At times there is no visible horizon </li></ul>
  12. 12. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  13. 13. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  14. 14. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Vanishing point is on the horizon line where receding lines appear to converge. </li></ul><ul><li>Objects that are parallel to one another have the same vanishing point. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  16. 16. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University http://www.arjanverschoor.nl/
  17. 17. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  18. 18. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  19. 19. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Atmospheric perspective- how the appearance of an object is affected by looking through air. </li></ul><ul><li>Distant objects lose information </li></ul><ul><ul><li>less contrast with their surroundings. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>less bright colours (become blue grey) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>less clarity - fuzzy edges </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>smaller </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  21. 21. Perspective Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  22. 22. Principles of design Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Balance, contrast </li></ul><ul><li>Economy </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis </li></ul><ul><li>Movement </li></ul><ul><li>Repetition, rhythm, pattern </li></ul><ul><li>Proportion </li></ul><ul><li>Unity, variety </li></ul>
  23. 23. Balance Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Visual equalisation of the elements in a work of art. </li></ul><ul><li>Symmetrical or asymmetrical </li></ul>
  24. 24. Balance Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Asymmetrical balance may appear more casual and less planned </li></ul><ul><li>Harder to use because the designer must plan the layout very carefully to ensure that it is still balanced </li></ul><ul><li>Unbalanced page or screen creates a feeling of tension as if the screen might tip </li></ul>
  25. 25. Balance Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Asymmetrical can be achieved by colour, value, shape, texture, position or eye direction. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Balance Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  27. 27. Balance Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  28. 28. Balance Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  29. 29. Balance Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  30. 30. Balance Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  31. 31. Balance Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  32. 32. Balance Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  33. 33. Contrast Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Combing art elements to stress the differences between the elements. </li></ul><ul><li>Bright with dull colours </li></ul><ul><li>Angular with rounded shapes </li></ul><ul><li>Related to emphasis </li></ul>
  34. 34. Contrast Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  35. 35. Contrast Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  36. 36. Economy Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Distillation of an image to the basic essentials for clarity of presentation. </li></ul><ul><li>Using only what is needed for visual effect </li></ul><ul><li>Eliminating any elements that distract attention from the essence of an idea. </li></ul><ul><li>It tends to be an abstraction. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Economy Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  38. 38. Economy Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  39. 39. Emphasis Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Certain elements assume more importance than others </li></ul><ul><li>Some features are emphasised and others are subordinated. </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis is concerned with dominance and the development of a main idea or centre of interest (focal point) </li></ul>
  40. 40. Emphasis Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  41. 41. Emphasis Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  42. 42. Movement Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Produces the look of action or to cause the viewer’s eye to sweep over the work in a certain manner. </li></ul><ul><li>Objects can be made to appear to be moving by different kinds of shapes, forms, lines and curves. </li></ul><ul><li>Diagonal lines tend to create the illusion of movement or motion. </li></ul>
  43. 43. Movement Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Changes in direction or change in the darkness or lightness of an image can also create a sense of motion. </li></ul><ul><li>Similar shapes connected with each other or overlapping each other can imply movement or restlessness. </li></ul>
  44. 44. Movement Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  45. 45. Movement Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  46. 46. Movement Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  47. 47. Movement Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  48. 48. Movement Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  49. 49. Movement Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  50. 50. Movement Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  51. 51. Repetition Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Combining art elements so that the same elements are used over and over to achieve balance and harmony. </li></ul><ul><li>Repetition, rhythm and pattern are design principles that complement each other, according to Larkin. </li></ul><ul><li>Grouping similar forms in an effort to satisfy the user's perceptual need for a sense of order and wholeness. </li></ul>
  52. 52. Repetition Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>The user recognises these traits and the eye is drawn to it. </li></ul><ul><li>Repetition is the most powerful when the variables of size, shape, texture and colour are equal. </li></ul>
  53. 53. Repetition Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  54. 54. Repetition Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  55. 55. Repetition Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  56. 56. Repetition Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  57. 57. Rhythm Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Combining art elements to produce the look and feel of movement, especially with a visual tempo or beat. </li></ul><ul><li>Rhythm can be described as timed movement through space; an easy, connected path along which the eye follows a regular arrangement of motifs. </li></ul><ul><li>Creates predictability and order in a composition. </li></ul>
  58. 58. Rhythm Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>The parallels between rhythm in sound/ music are very exact to the idea of rhythm in a visual composition. </li></ul><ul><li>The difference is that the timed &quot;beat&quot; is sensed by the eyes rather than the ears. </li></ul><ul><li>The rhythm can be irregular or regular. </li></ul>
  59. 59. Rhythm Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  60. 60. Rhythm Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  61. 61. Rhythm Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  62. 62. Rhythm Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Linear rhythm refers to the characteristic flow of the individual line. </li></ul><ul><li>Accomplished artists have a rhythm of their own. </li></ul><ul><li>Linear rhythm is not as dependent on pattern, but is more dependent on timed movement of the viewer's eye. </li></ul>
  63. 63. Rhythm Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Clear repetition of elements in a composition, or it may be a more subtle in the underlying structure of the image. </li></ul><ul><li>Alternation is a specific instance of patterning in which a sequence of repeating motifs are presented in turn; (short/long; fat/thin; round/square; dark/light). </li></ul>
  64. 64. Rhythm Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Gradation employs a series of motifs patterned to relate to one another through a regular progression of steps. This may be a gradation of shape or colour. </li></ul><ul><li>Can create a sequence of events, not unlike a series of images in a comic strip. </li></ul><ul><li>The use of rhythm is the designer's ability to use sustained repetition to assist in the provision of a sense of order. </li></ul>
  65. 65. Rhythm Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  66. 66. Pattern Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>The principle of design that is the repetition of shapes, lines, colors, etc. </li></ul>
  67. 67. Pattern Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  68. 68. Proportion Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Proportion is the principle of design that deals with the relationship in size of one component of a work of art to another. </li></ul>
  69. 69. Proportion Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  70. 70. Proportion Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University
  71. 71. Unity and variety Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Unity is the quality of wholeness or oneness that is achieved through the effective use of the elements and principles of design (harmony). </li></ul><ul><li>Variety is a way of combining art elements in involved ways to achieve intricate and complex relationships. </li></ul>
  72. 72. Websites Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>http://www.universaldesignstudio.com/online/flash.php </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.attilahartwig.com/# </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.rootylicious.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.dunun.com/2002/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.studiobreakfast.be/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.antonwatts.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.exactitudes.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.olaf-veltman.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.sagmeister.com/ </li></ul>
  73. 73. Summary Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Shapes, textures and patterns can be organic or manmade. They can affect the personality of the interface and should be appropriate, interesting and consistent. </li></ul>
  74. 74. Summary Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>Perspective is the means of representing 3D objects on a 2D surface. It is achieved by relative size, overlapping objects, blurring and sharpening and lines meeting at a point. </li></ul>
  75. 75. Summary Version A Unit 10 ©2008 Napier University <ul><li>The principles of design are balance, contrast, economy, emphasis, movement, repetition, rhythm, pattern, proportion, unity and variety. </li></ul>

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